The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello,

''It important she be doing this task properly.''
''Don't be doing this!''

Is it correct to use a continuous aspect after subjunctive to emphasize continuation? And is it correct to use it too in imperative for the same purpose as in the second sentence?

Thank you very muchc

Hello JakiGeh,

In modern English we use a normal finite verb form after and introductory it + adjective. Continuous forms are fine:

It is good (that) he is taking extra English lessons.

It is important (that) she gets a chance to relax.

 

Imperatives are not usually found in continuous forms so 'Don't do...' would be the correct form here. In some dialects a continuous form can be used in informal contexts, but this is a non-standard form, I would say:

Don't think you can change my mind.

Don't be thinking you can change my mind.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi
please help me. i'm really confused about it...
what's the difference between 'motivated from' and 'motivated by'

Hi KHANSAAKHAN,

The phrase 'motivated from' is quite rare and is used only in a few phrases, I believe. These include 'motivated from within' and 'motivated from a desire to...'

The phrase 'motivated by' is much more common and can be used to describe any source of motivation.

If you have come across a use of 'motivated from' which seems different from those described above then feel free to post it and we will be happy to comment on it.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I would like to know what will be the reported speech of the given below statement,
'Call me when you arrive', father said to his son

Hello sbsomaya,

There are a number of options for reporting imperative forms and the form you choose depends on how polite or direct you wish to make it sound. The most common choice would be to use 'tell':

The father told his son to call (him) when he arrived.

 

You could also use other forms:

The father said that his son had to call (him) when he arrived.

The father said that his son should call (him) when he arrived.

 

For more information on reported speech patterns please take a look at our relevant pages:

reporting verbs

reporting: reports and summaries

reported speech 1

reported speech 2

reported questions

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi sir,

Is it right to say in the reported speech, The father told his son to call him when he arrives.

Hello sbsomaya,

Strictly speaking, the correct form is 'arrived', not 'arrives', though you might hear or read 'arrives' in some texts. I would recommend you used 'arrived', though.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thks sir for lifting my dark clouds. Regards.

Hi I have confusion between noun clause which is apposition to noun or pronoun and adjective clause. What are the tips to find the differences between them?

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