The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hi sbsomaya,

I think it would help if you provide an example sentence. We identify the roles clauses play in sentences when they are in context, not in the abstract. If you have a particular sentence which confuses you then we'll be happy to comment on it.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Example: 'It is clear that he was guilty.' I have read this sentence in Wren and Martin. I am quite confused that whether it is a noun clause apposition to the pronoun or adjective complement.

Hello sbsomaya,

This sentence is an example of what we call an extraposed subject. This is a sentence structure where the subject is moved to later in the sentence for reasons of emphasis and/or clarity. The sentence without the subject moved would be as follows:

That he was guilty is clear.

 

There are many forms of extraposition. You can read more about them here.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi
Is it correct to say, " if i HAVE got that game, i would be that person" or " if i HAD that game, i would be that person". I think if It's a wish for the future then it should be 'have'. ??

Kind regards
Thank you in advance
Little granny

Hello Little granny,

The second version of the sentence is the correct one. You can read more about this on our Conditionals 1 and 2 pages.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello is this sentence correct? Someone told me that "we and "you" cannot be in the same sentence.

I hope that we continue to recognise the fantastic work you have been doing in the region.

Hello Duls,

That rule is not correct -- your example sentence, which is perfectly correct, shows this.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you all for the questions and answers.

This is the house where he was assaulted. Is it an adverb clause or adjective clause. Some said it is an adverb clause but why it is describing the noun house?

Hello aseel aftab,

This is an example of a relative clause describing the noun 'house'. These are sometimes called 'adjective clauses' and have an adjectival function. You can read more about these structures on the following pages:

relative pronouns

relative clauses

defining relative clauses

non-defining relative clauses

 

Please note that we have already answered five or six very similar questions from you asking us to identify clause types and I'm afraid we cannot contine to answer the same question again and again. Please look back at the answers we have given previously and look at the links above so that you can identify the repeating patterns and identify them yourself.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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