We can use superlative adverbs to make comparisons:

His ankles hurt badly, but his knees hurt worst.
It rains most often at the beginning of the year.

Intensifiers:

When we intensify a superlative adverb we often use the in front of the adverb, and we use these words and phrases as intensifiers:

easily - much - far - by far

Exercise

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Comments

Hi Sir;

It costs more than I expected

According to the grammar book, "more than" is used to tell something happens a greater number.

But here, "more than" is used to compare "It costs" clause and "I expected" clauses. Here more than doesn't compare with verb or noun or adjective and meaning not "something happens a greater number."

What is the grammar syntax behind this sentence pattern, Please?.

Hello pumbi,

Another way to say this is 'It costs more than the cost that I expected'. The sentence is comparing the real cost to the expected cost.

Does that help?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Yeah, sir. I understand much better now. Thank you.

What is correct and why?
I like her the best. or
I like her best.

Hello Sunnystream,

Both can be correct, though one might be more or less correct depending on where and how it is used. Since 'the' is sometimes dropped before superlative adjectives and adverbs in an informal style, the second would be fine in an informal situation. But in others, using 'the' would probably be advisable.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

"Disaster struck when we least expected it"

Why using past tense in this sentence when it is always true?

regards

Hello chancornelius,

It's difficult to say for certain without knowing the context of this sentence, but I imagine the writer of this sentence is talking about a specific past time. Even if something is always true, it can also be true at a specific time in the past. Does that make sense?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

You write: "When we intensify a superlative adverb we often use "the" in front of the adverb..."
Now is this grammatically correct?
It rains by far the most often at the beginning of the year.

Maybe it is... but it just sounds a bit strange to me.

Hello Ondra K,

The operative word here is 'often'! The reason we say 'often' is that conventions of use mean that some sentences feel awkward with 'the' included. There is nothing grammatically wrong with your example but it does sound odd because the convention of use is to not use 'the' in this particular example. This is actually a good demonstration of the fact that simply learning rules is not sufficient to develop fluent natural English - it is necessary to be exposed to real language in order to pick up these subtleties of use.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello ELT
can I say : his ankles hurt badly, but his knees hurt by far the worst/ ... far the worst/...easily the worst.
if no than how are the intensifiers used in this sentence.

regards

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