The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hi there,

''Do you ever remember Marta that went dancing with you''
''Do you ever remember Marta who went dancing with you''

Can we use ''that'' as the beginning when describing people?
Is there a difference between ''who'' and ''that''?

Thank you.

Hello MCWSL,

'That' can be used in relative clauses describing people provided that they are defining relative clauses. The problem here is that the relative clause is unlikely to be a defining relative clause. We would only use a defining relative clause if we are trying to identify which Marta we are asking about - the Marta who... as opposed to the Marta who...

If we change 'Marta' to something more general then the sentence would be fine:

 

''Do you remember the girl that went dancing with you''

''Do you remember the girl who went dancing with you''

('Remember' is not an action we take but rather a state, so we would not use 'ever' here)

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello team
before teachers start to teach they write the "Date" at the moment
and they say to the class that write it in your book so I need to know how real native english teachers to do this, and what are the collocations ,
here are my thoughts
01. put the date
02..write the date today
03 .having put the date
04. get written the date
05.lay the date

please help me I want to know how real Eng. goes thank you

Hello raj jk,

Teachers have different habits so now every teacher will ask the class to write the date. Some will simply write it on the board and expect that class to do the same without instruction.

If you want to tell the class to do this then there are several ways but I would say that the most common are as follows:

Write the date down (in your books).

Put the date at the top of the page.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

''Imagine that I was laying on a beach right now'' (past continuous referring to unreal present as in construction wish + that clause)

''Imagine that I would be laying on a beach right now'' (reduced if clause)

I know that the sentences could be simplified to ''imagine me laying on..'' or ''imagine I am laying'', but I'd like to know if they are correct and what meaning they have.

Thanks

Hello JakiGeh,

'lay' and 'lie' are a bit difficult to use correctly, even for native speakers, largely because the past simple form of 'lie' is 'lay', which spelt identically to the verb 'lay'. In other words, the forms (infinitive, past simple, past participle - ing form) for the two words are:

lay, laid, laid - laying (to put something down in a flat position)
lie, lay, lain - lying (to put yourself down in a flat position)

So the verb you need here is 'lie', and the past continuous form is 'lying'. If you changed your first sentence to 'Imagine (that) I was lying on a beach', it would be correct. Note that a present form (e.g. 'Imagine I'm lying on a beach') is also possible here -- the word 'imagine' makes it clear that it is an unreal situation.

Your second sentence is not correct. As far as I can think, 'would' can't be used after 'imagine'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

Is this sentence correct? That ''like more of a stupid person'' is tricky to me.

''I haven't felt like more of a stupid person in my entire life''

Thanks

Hello MCWSL,

No, I'm afraid it is not. You could say 'I've never felt so stupid in my life' or 'I've never felt like such a stupid person in my whole life'. We use 'so' before adjectives and 'such' before noun phrases.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

''I will say that she(Laura) has been rude one time to me''

Does ''I'' report what he/she is going to say to Laura?
Why do we not alter tenses? Is it because it's in the future(going to be said) or is still true? For example, in the past we usually alter tenses in subordinate clauses because it's the past.

Thank you.

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