The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

I am a new member. Looking forward to learn 
English from this site.

I am really thrilled and extremely happy to be a new member of this site.  Being a teacher, I find it the most useful tool to equip myself so that I can give effective, lively and interesting learning exercises to my children. A big thank you to all who take much pains to render us such valuable service.

Does anyone know how to improve writing skill most effective? I have to work and use email everyday. Tks alot

utter nuisense? utterly nonsense? music shiznits? musically shiznits?
How do we know the diff? where to use as an adj and where as an adv?
I tried to play? some places i tried to playing? how  to use the an exact form of verb whether present or continuous?
Plz hlp!!
Thanx :)

Hi Mujtaba

Thanks for writing - You have asked two questions here and so I'll answer them one at a time.

'utter' or 'complete' can be used as adjectives before a noun.

That boy is an utter idiot

The party was a complete disaster.

'utterly' or 'completely' can be used as intensifying adverbs before some adjectives.

I was completely surprised by your news.

I want to do something utterly different.

So briefly: adjectives come before nouns

                  adverbs come before adjectives

I hope that this is a complete answer.

Your second question is about verb patterns. How can you know what form of a verb to use after other verbs?

I like playing the guitar.

I want to play the guitar.

I'm afraid that there is no simple rule that governs which verbs are followed by the -ing form and which are followed by infinitives. I normally tell my students that verbs which express their opinion about an activity are followed by the -ing form (love - adore - like - don't mind - dislike - hate - can't stand).

Unfortunately this is not a very reliable rule and to be safe, you have to learn the patterns like vocabulary.

I hope that this helps.

Jack Radford

The LearnEnglish Team

im trying to tread? im trying to treading? starting to play? starting to playing? im really confused! :)

thank you
very good

thank you british council because this site is the best english learning website and I'm happy to find it

The best English learning web site!

 am happy to find this  website.  thank you very much britishcouncil

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