The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Section: 

Comments

Hello krishna0891,

I'm not sure I fully understand your question, as it's not clear to me what the 'different things' are.  If you want a very general way to say this (remembering that these are not questions, of course, but rather exclamations), then you could say 'I don't know which things are where' or 'I don't know where to find what'.

I hope that helps you.  Please reply to this if you had something else in mind.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thank you sir,
i want the general expression only. in my question, 'different things in my house' means pen, radio, marker, trimmer etc... general things. i want to say, i don't know where they are(any single thing) exactly in my house.
 
according to your first answer, could i say 'I don't know which thing is where' (in view of a singular). is this sentence melodious?? else pls improve this....
Thank you....
krishna

Hello again krishna0891,

The sentences I suggested ('I don't know which things are where' and 'I don't know where to find what') are really general sentences - ways of saying 'I can' find anything' or 'The whole place is a mess'.  To talk about specific items you can say 'I don't know where each thing is', provided you have a group of items in front of you, or a list of items to refer to, and you want to talk about them.  If you just want to talk generally, and not about a certain group of items, then you could say 'I don't know where any single thing is', but it's quite hard for me to think of a context where this would be the most natural choice; something simpler, such as 'I can't find a thing' or 'I don't know where anything is' would be much more likely.

I hope that helps to answer your question.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you sir.

sir, i'm often confused with the varied numbers of sounds in most english textbooks available in my country,mostly against the conventional 44. Help me sir.

Hello odunayo,

Perhaps this inconsistency is due to the variation in the number of phonemes amongst the different varieties of English. In most varieties, there are 24 consonant phonemes, but the number of vowel phonemes generally ranges between 14 and 21, depending on the variety. Would that explain what you see in the textbooks you mention?

In case it might be useful to you, in closing I just wanted to mention the British Council's Phonemic Chart, which is found on our sister site Teaching English.

Please don't hesitate to ask us again if you have any other questions.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

HI
I am interested to know how can you develop a topic fully and appropriately?
If possible,please provide an example of it.
I hope to hear from you soon.
With kind regards,
Livon
 
 

Hi Livon,

Have you seen our section called Writing for a Purpose? It sounds like it might be just what you're looking for, particularly the pages on Essays.

If you have any other questions, please let us know.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,

Actually , I am interested to know how we can develop a topic fully and appropriately in the spoken English.

If you could explain me this query with an example,I would be very grateful to you.

With kind regards,

Livon

Hi Livon,
'Develop a topic fully and appropriately' sounds like a requirement for candidates for IELTS - is that why you're asking the question? If you've got a question about IELTS, can you please ask it in our IELTS section - that way, other users who are interested in IELTS can see the answer, too.
Best wishes,
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

Pages