The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

frnds... i haven't got the answer yet! i wonder if the idioms and phrase vary from english to english? i mean i use an idiom or a phrase such as "gung ho" would it let the listner realise or recognise ... i mean i wonder if they exist in english english? don't they? :)

what is the right answer :
i have been learning english for three years or i have learned english for three years  or i learn english for three years.
-- i live here for five years or i have lived here for five years  or i have been living here for  five years.

it depends refat on what d'you wanna say.
if u started smthing three years b4 n still continue to do till this time you will use " i have been" its "present perfect continuous tense. i.e., i have been learning english for three years but it seems .....
or if u started smthing on the other hand; three years ago n do not continue any further;  you willl use "i have" only. its "present perfect tense.  i have learned/learnt english for 3 years....and you think i haven't!
 
But "i learn for three years" however, doesn't sound very gud to me....i don't know if it makes any sense? yeah if it was "i learn english" only, than it didn't have any prblm with it.
i don't know! ;)

Hi Mujtaba and Refat,
There's some more information about these forms here.
Best wishes,
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

Oh, its great! i checked it out. :)

Sir,
Mujtaba scored 23 last season for Reds, took 16 games to GET OFF THE MARK this time round.
i know  what off the mark means...and i know slow/quick off the mark too. but doesn't make any sense in this context to me. can you walk me through sir?
Thanx :)

Hi Mujtab,
'Get off the mark' means to start scoring. So in your example, the first goal came after 16 games.
Is that clear?
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

what is the difference in the meaning between these sentences :
i have been reading this book for several hours .
i have been writing this book for a year .
it has been raining all the morning .

Team,
 
I would like to Understand difference between.
Are you working? and Do you working?
 
Where we supposed use Are and Do?
 
 

Hello Sachithanandam,
'Do you working?' is not good English. When we make questions in English, we move an auxiliary or modal verb to the start of the sentence.
The auxiliary verb in the sentence 'You are working' is 'are', so the correct question is 'Are you working?'. In the sentence 'You work', there is no auxiliary, so we use 'do' instead and ask 'Do you work?''. See this page for more information.
Hope this helps,
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

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