The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hi Nishadashif,
I'm not sure if you mean 'learn quickly' (in a short time) or 'learn to speak quickly' (make the words and sentences quickly).  However, to do both you need to study and you need to practise.  You can find a lot of materials here on LearnEnglish to help you.  Use the top bar to navigate, and try different activities to see what is most useful for you.  Remember that learning takes time, and don't get discouraged!  To practise, it's good to have a partner.  Perhaps you have a friend who is also learning English, and with whom you can practise - that is a very good way, in my experience.
Good luck!
 
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi English learn team
I'd like to ask you about some sentences that I've heard.
1. I is you.
2. He was going to airport now.
I think the word "is" can't be placed with subject " I ", and "now" cannot be placed with past form  what is the meaning of that sentences ?
thank you. :)

Hi Raspati,
You are correct that we cannot use 'is' with the subject 'I', and we cannot use 'now' with a past meaning; both of these sentences are incorrect so I cannot really say what their meaning is.  The first sentence is especially strange: even if we change the 'is' to 'am', we get 'I am you', which does not really make sense.
I hope that clarifies it for you somewhat.
Best wishes,
 
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you Peter for your explanation.
regards,

Can anyone answer me please how to address a person in polite way?
Is it correct to say "could be given your time to discuss..." what is the polite phrase  or way asking someone for time to discuss especially in business environment
Regards,
 

Hello mir_m,
I'm afraid your sentence isn't correct, but there are a number of ways to say this.  Two of the most natural and common would be:
'Could I talk to you for a moment?'
'Do you have a moment (to talk about something)?'
Politeness is a tricky area, but I think this podcast and the exercises with it might be very useful for you.
I hope that helps you.
Best wishes,
 
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello sir,
kindly asking you to lead me that how can i have a better and fluent talking in an interview? and please give some info about how i start a job interview as a professional,
Regards
Sami
Herat, Afghanistan

Hello Herat,
Have you seen our video series You're Hired? It deals with the language used in job interviews.
Best wishes,
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

This site is very useful.I really appreciate what you gave us. The use of prepositions makes me difficult in writing. Could you give me a piece of advice?
May God bless you all!

Hello seng roi,
Preposition are quite challenging because different languages have different ways of talking about place and time.  It's a very big area, but here are some links that might help you:
prepositional phrases
adjectives and prepositions
prepositions and times and dates
verbs and prepositions
prepositions and location
prepositions and direction
I hope you find those useful.  Let us know how you get on!
Best wishes,
 
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team
 

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