The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

How are you?
Choose,
Her birthday is next Friday.She (is having-is going to have) a party.
Is this sentence an arrangement?

Hello Adill,

Both forms (is going to have and is having) are possible here. It could be an intention (a plan in her mind) or it could be an arrangement (something she has already organised). There is no way to tell this from the sentence alone, of course, as we would need to see inside her head!

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct
Thank you in advance
Thanks in advance or
Thank you in advanced?
Thank you

Hello angie2,

The third one is incorrect; the other two are fine.

'Thanks' is less formal than 'Thank you'.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask to following;
What is the difference in meaning in the following verbs;
When do we use
to speak, to say, to tell and /or to talk
Thank you in advanced

Hi angie,

There is an explanation of the difference between 'speak' and 'talk' on this page and an explanation of 'say' and 'tell' on this page. I think those pages should clarify this for you, but if you have any specific questions after that, please feel free to ask us.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, Disciplinary cases relating to different civil services are here.

Anything relating to maths is a complete mystery to me.

I think, In these sentences, We can use adjective 'related to' rather than 'relating to' because they both seem to mean the same right ? are these two interchangeable in situations like these ?

That's a good enough reason which, I think, can make you laugh.

In this sentence, I used commas before 'I think' and after it because it breaks two clauses first (That's a good enough reason) second (which can make you laugh) is it the right use of this comma here ?

Hello SonuKumar,

Thank you for providing the examples. It always helps us be sure that we understand the question properly.

In these cases you are correct: we can use related to and relating to interchangeably when we mean 'about' or 'concerning'. 

However, in other contexts there is a difference in meaning. As well as the meaning above, related to can mean 'connected to' or 'having similarities to'. Thus we can use it to talk about family or other relationships.

 

The commas are correct in your example.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello.
How to say opposite sentence for:
-The doctor is in.
Will be the correct:
- The doctor is out.
or
- The doctor is not in.

Thank you very much.

Hello TalkToMeEnglish,

Both The doctor is out and The doctor is not in are fine.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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