The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask the following:
1.Are you interested in starting French lessons? Is it correct to use the verb start?
2. Are you interested in history/ the environment? Can we use a noun after interested in?
Thank you in advanced

Hello angie,

The answer to both questions is yes. Those are all correct.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

HI, the links do not all seem to be working. I know that in another section you posted alternative links to access these areas, do you think you could provide them for this section? thanks

Joe sends messages to his friends on his phone.

If this sentence is correct, please explain why 'on' is used here instead of 'from'

If it is wrong, then please clarify the correct sentence.

Thank you.

Hello Sad,

Prepositional use can vary quite widely with modern technology. For example, you can hear people use various prepositions when describing being online: on the Internet, in the Internet, from the Internet etc.

As far as your example goes, I think that from his phone is the most likely option. You can do something  on your phone or send something from your phone, I would say. However, as I said, preposition use may vary across dialects and social groups.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Speaking of prepositions;
Which of the following sentences are the correct ones?

'What are you laughing at or about?'

'It arrives at London or in London?'

'What are you thinking of or about?'

Thanks

Hello Sad,

You can say laugh about or laugh at when you find a topic or situation funny:

I told him what I did and we both laughed about it.

I told him what I did and we both laughed at the situation.

 

However, when you laugh at someone you find them ridiculous or stupid in some way:

Hey! It's not nice to laught at her like that. She made a mistake, that's all.

 

For cities we use arrive in. You can say arrive at when you are talking about a building or similar location.

 

We say think about to describe the topic of our thoughts or to mean consider a decision:

I'm thinking about what you say earlier.

We need to think about when to arrange our next meeting.

 

We say think of when we mean imagine or invent something:

I need to think of something to say before she arrives.

 

You can find examples of the prepositions which are used with verbs by looking up those verbs in a good dictionary.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks for replying.

'I am thinking about what you say earlier' or 'I am thinking about what you said earlier'

Please clarify
Thanks

Hi Sad,

The second one is correct. 'earlier' indicates that the action of 'saying' was in the past and the verb should reflect this.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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