The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Thanks for replying.

'I am thinking about what you say earlier' or 'I am thinking about what you said earlier'

Please clarify
Thanks

Hi Sad,

The second one is correct. 'earlier' indicates that the action of 'saying' was in the past and the verb should reflect this.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks for replying.

I understood what you said, but away from modern use of prepositions, is it a correct grammar sentence when I say ' Joe sends messages to his friends on his phone?'

Or the correct one must be 'from' instead of 'on'. That is what confuseses me. Because I feel it is impossible to use 'on' here, it does not make sense.

Regards

Hi Sad,

'on' is correct here. As Peter, says, 'from' might be more common and other prepositions are possible (e.g. 'with'). Personally, I would probably say 'on' in this case.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi.
But has it anything to do with formal and informal language?
I mean 'on' sounds a bit strange to me.
In this case, anyone can choose any preposition which sounds suitable, but aren't we following the language rules?

Hello again Sad,

It has nothing to do with style and formality.

Language rules are not fixed from above but rather are descriptive, showing us what the language community considers to be standard at a given point in time. The fact that more than one preposition is commonly used by a given language community does not mean that anyone can use any preposition.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Which one of the following is correct. When it is too hot, we use the adjecive the sun is too hot or the sun is too strong?
Thank you in advanced

Hi angie,

I'm afraid I can't give you a very good answer without knowing the context and the meaning that you want to communicate. In general, though, I think either 'strong' or 'hot' are fine.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct;
I would like to know when they are going to visit us and for how long so I can fix my program? or... so I can schedule my program?(my daily program I mean)
Thank you in advanced

Hello angie2,

I think arrange or plan would be the best verbs here, though it's hard to be sure without knowing the full context.

Please note that this isn't really the kind of question we deal with on LearnEnglish. We're happy to help people with questions about English and explain how and why certain structures are correct or not, but we don't function as a proofreading service or checking point for users' commmunications, emails and so on.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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