The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

What should be the correct answer?
The cheapest of these cameras (cost / costs) $2000.
I personally think it should be costs' . Am I correct? 'Looking forward to your reply.

Hello amrita_enakshi,

Yes, that is correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team 

Hello sir , a little confusion with the subject verb agreement in the following sentence.
A list of items to be brought for Oliver (is /are) being written down.
I opt for 'is' as list is the subject. Am I correct?

Hello amrita,

That's correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Is the following sentence correct?
For her last birthday, I hid the cake in a place where she wouldn't find it when she returned home.
What will the difference be if I use returns instead of returned? Also, is the wouldn't here the past tense of will not? If not, why did we use wouldn't?

Hello HT2001,

Yes, that sentence is correct. The whole sentence refers to past time ('last birthday' tells us this) and therefore the action of returning happened in the past; therefore 'returns' is not correct.

'Would' here functions as the past form of 'will'. If you were talking about a general habit - let's say something you do every birthday then you might say:

For her birthday, I hide the cake in a place where she won't find it when she returns home.

If you were talking about her next birthday then you might say:

For her next birthday, I'll hide the cake in a place where she won't find it when she returns home.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello.Can we say " I still enjoy it now "in this sentence below?
I started playing the piano when I was seven years old and I still enjoy it now.
Can we use both "when " and "and" and are the verbs in right tense?
Please,check this.Thank you.

Hello Aram,

Yes, that sentence is correct. Good work!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Sir
Kindly tell me the reason for using a question mark in this sentence instead of a full stop.
So, she could have been to Berlin last month or ten years ago?
Is it the way you ask somebody or tell somebody? Although it is not the question form, it sounds like a question. Is it the reason? Please let me know.
Thank you.

Hello Andrew international,

Yes, this is a declarative question. In declarative questions the normal word order is used even though they are questions. Usually we use a declarative question when we want to ask another person to confirm that we've understood correctly.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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