1. We use the indefinite article, a/an, with count nouns when the hearer/reader does not know exactly which one we are referring to:

Police are searching for a 14 year-old girl.

2. We also use it to show the person or thing is one of a group:

She is a pupil at London Road School.

 

Police have been searching for a 14 year-old girl who has been missing since Friday.

Jenny Brown, a pupil at London Road School, is described as 1.6 metres tall with short blonde hair.

She was last seen wearing a blue jacket, a blue and white blouse and dark blue jeans and blue shoes. 

Anyone who has information should contact the local police on 0800349781.


3. We do not use an indefinite article with plural nouns and uncount nouns:

She was wearing blue shoes. (= plural noun)
She has short blonde hair. (= uncount noun)

 

Police have been searching for a 14 year-old girl who has been missing since Friday.

Jenny Brown, a pupil at London Road School, is described as 1.6 metres tall with short blonde hair.

She was last seen wearing a blue jacket, a blue and white blouse and dark blue jeans and blue shoes

Anyone who has information should contact the local police on 0800349781.

 


4. We use a/an to say what someone is or what job they do:

My brother is a doctor.
George is a student.

5. We use a/an with a singular noun to say something about all things of that kind:

A man needs friends. (= All men need friends)
A dog likes to eat meat. (= All dogs like to eat meat)

 Exercise

Comments

Hello Sir!
1.''John was appointed as superintendent of police, City.''
2. ''He was posted as assistant director research wing.''
''superintendent'' and ''assistant director'' are countable nouns. But in the first sentence, ''a'' and ''an'' are not put before superintendent and assistant director respectively. Would it be correct if I put ''a'' and ''an'' before before it respectively? Sir please explain it to me, and suggest me a link, if there is, where I get to know where one should not use an indefinite article before countable nouns.

Hello ali shah,

There is a choice here. It is possible to use an article or not.

When no article is used the terms Superintendent of Police, City and Assistant Director, Reseach Wing are titles (and shoudl be capitalised), just as we would say elected President or crowned King.

When an article is used the terms are used in a descriptive sense rather than as titles. If you say a superintendent then we understand that there are several superintendents of police, and John is one of them. If you say the superintendent of police then we understand that there is only one such position (but it is a descriptive term, not a title) and John now holds it.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you, Sir. Peter. God bless you.

i want to ask a general question if you don't mind
what is the difference between those three pages for grammar ( English grammar / beginner grammar / intermediate grammar ? and that page in cambridge web site ? and finally how could you advice me to provide my grammar and what can i do to speak well ?

Hi again omarmohamed99,

Generally, the grammar covered in 'Beginner grammar' is lower level than the grammar covered in 'Intermediate grammar'. The 'English Grammar' section isn't classified by level and is a bit more systematic. If there is a specific point you need help on, please ask us and we will help direct you to the appropriate pages.

There is some advice on how to get the most out of our site and how to use it for various purposes (such as improving your grammar and/or speaking) on our Frequently asked questions page.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

dear sir
please i want more explain and more examples for this case ( next
1. We use the indefinite article, a/an, with count nouns when the hearer/reader does not know exactly which one we are referring to) i can't understand it clearly

Hello omarmohamed99,

I would suggest you read our Articles 1 and Articles 2 pages. The Cambridge Dictionary also has a long entry on articles that could also be useful.

If you have any specific questions about a specific sentence, please don't hesitate to ask us.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, my Greek friend has asked the following question which I can't help with the grammar point. we can say 'a great many ...., but not a very few ...' why?

Hello Floyd,

It's helpful to consider the difference between a few and few first of all.

We use few when we want to emphasise that there are not enough. For example, if I say I have few friends then I am suggesting that I am rather lonely.

We use a few when we want to emphasise that there is a satisfactory number. For example, if I say I have a few friends then I am suggesting that I am happy with what I have.

Given this, very works well with few, showing a lack of something. However, it does not conceptually fit with a few in the same way that we don't say very enough. It's not that it is impossible to say a very few for rhetorical effect, but it is unusual.

I hope that helps to clarify it for you.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank's Peter M, I will pass the message to my Greek friend.

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