Some verbs are two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases). They consist of a verb and a particle:

  • grow + up
    >> The children are growing up.

Often this gives the verb a new meaning:

  • take + after
    >> She takes after her mother
    = She looks like her mother, or She behaves like her mother.
  • count + on
    >> I know I can count on you
    = I know I can trust you, or I know I can believe you.

Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) have only one pattern:

N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

[Note: N = noun; V = verb; p = particle]

N (Subject)  Verb Particle  N (Object)
She
I
My father
takes
can count
comes
after
on
from
her mother
you
Madrid


Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) are phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs have two different patterns:

• The usual pattern is: N + V + N + p

 

N (Subject) Verb (N) Object Particle
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours
back
over
behind

 
• But sometimes these verbs have the pattern: N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

 

N (Subject) Verb Particle N (Object)
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
back
over
behind
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours

When the object is a personal pronoun,these verbs always have the pattern:

N + V +N + p:

  • She gave back it
    >> She gave it back
  • He knocked over it
     >> knocked it over
  • We will be leaving behind them
    >> We will be leaving them behind

• Phrasal verbs are nearly always made up of a transitive verb and a particle. Common verbs with their most frequent particles are:

bring: about, along, back, forward, in, off, out, round, up
buy: out, up
call: off, up
carry: off, out
cut: back, down, off, out, up
give: away, back, off
hand: back, down, in, on out, over, round
knock: down, out, over
leave: behind, out
let: down, in, off, out
pass: down, over, round
point: out
push: about, around, over
put: across, away, down, forward, off, on, out, through, together, up
read: out
set: apart, aside, back, down
shut: away, in, off, out
take: apart, away, back, down, in, on, up, over
think: over, through, up
   





 

 

 

Exercise

Comments

Hello. I hope you all are doing well. Just yesterday while reading toefl material I came across this "You need them replaced" which seemed to me incorrect. Then I googled and found a number of such usage. I thought it would be correct to say "You need them to be replaced" instead. Can some of you explain the usage of "need them replaced"

Hello Bekhzad,

The construction [need + object + past participle] is quite common. It has a similar meaning to [need to have + object + past participle]:

You need the house painted.

You need to have the house painted.

 

The implication is that someone else (a professional) will do the task.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

oh now i found it . Thank you a lot Mr. Peter May .

I also assumed so, but is there any rule written ? Neither Oxford nor Cambridge online dictionaries and other dictionaries have provided such use of "need" as "have". I am quite aware of using have/get+object+V(III) but need .

Hello,
I was wondering can we use "Shut up" as a Phrasal verb?
Thank you

Hi Jake_vera,

Yes, 'shut up' is a phrasal verb -- follow the link to see some examples of how it is used.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Is there a difference between sell for and sell at ?
Regards
Petals

Hi Petals,

As far as I know, there is no difference in 'selling for' a certain price and 'selling at' a certain price. There may be a difference in some specific contexts, but I can't think of any right now.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

May I ask what "The walkers got cut off by the advancing tide." means? It doesn't make sense to me.

Thank you.

Hi learning,

It's difficult to give a specific meaning without knowing the context, but it looks as if 'cut off' means something like 'stopped' or 'isolated' here. A 'tide' is water coming in from the sea, and I'd guess that's what's referred to here since the subject of the first phrase is 'walkers', though it's often used metaphorically to refer to a change.

Hope this helps.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

 

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