Some verbs are two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases). They consist of a verb and a particle:

  • grow + up
    >> The children are growing up.

Often this gives the verb a new meaning:

  • take + after
    >> She takes after her mother
    = She looks like her mother, or She behaves like her mother.
  • count + on
    >> I know I can count on you
    = I know I can trust you, or I know I can believe you.

Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) have only one pattern:

N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

[Note: N = noun; V = verb; p = particle]

N (Subject)  Verb Particle  N (Object)
She
I
My father
takes
can count
comes
after
on
from
her mother
you
Madrid


Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) are phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs have two different patterns:

• The usual pattern is: N + V + N + p

 

N (Subject) Verb (N) Object Particle
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours
back
over
behind

 
• But sometimes these verbs have the pattern: N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

 

N (Subject) Verb Particle N (Object)
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
back
over
behind
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours

When the object is a personal pronoun,these verbs always have the pattern:

N + V +N + p:

  • She gave back it
    >> She gave it back
  • He knocked over it
     >> knocked it over
  • We will be leaving behind them
    >> We will be leaving them behind

• Phrasal verbs are nearly always made up of a transitive verb and a particle. Common verbs with their most frequent particles are:

bring: about, along, back, forward, in, off, out, round, up
buy: out, up
call: off, up
carry: off, out
cut: back, down, off, out, up
give: away, back, off
hand: back, down, in, on out, over, round
knock: down, out, over
leave: behind, out
let: down, in, off, out
pass: down, over, round
point: out
push: about, around, over
put: across, away, down, forward, off, on, out, through, together, up
read: out
set: apart, aside, back, down
shut: away, in, off, out
take: apart, away, back, down, in, on, up, over
think: over, through, up
   





 

 

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Hello,
Is there a difference between sell for and sell at ?
Regards
Petals

Hi Petals,

As far as I know, there is no difference in 'selling for' a certain price and 'selling at' a certain price. There may be a difference in some specific contexts, but I can't think of any right now.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

May I ask what "The walkers got cut off by the advancing tide." means? It doesn't make sense to me.

Thank you.

Hi learning,

It's difficult to give a specific meaning without knowing the context, but it looks as if 'cut off' means something like 'stopped' or 'isolated' here. A 'tide' is water coming in from the sea, and I'd guess that's what's referred to here since the subject of the first phrase is 'walkers', though it's often used metaphorically to refer to a change.

Hope this helps.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

 

Hi Kirk,

What does "walker" mean in this sentence?

The walkers got cut off by the advancing tide.

Thanks again.

Hi learning,

I'd suggest you check the dictionary for words that you don't understand. For example, see the Cambridge Dictionary entry for the word.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,

I did look it up in the dictionary, and walker means "a device for use by a weak or disabled person as a support while walking." How can a walker be cut off by the tide? That's why I don't understand.

Thanks.

Hello learning,

'Walker' has several meanings and you need to identify which of them fits the context. In this case the Cambridge Dictionary gives three definitions:

> a person who walks, especially for exercise or enjoyment

 

> baby walker  a seat on wheels that a baby can sit in and use its feet to move along, before it is able to walk

 

> Zimmer frame  a metal frame with fourlegs that you place in front of you and leanon to help you move forward if you have difficulty in walking, for example when old

In this context the first definition fits best.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you very much sir for always helping me with my questions about English grammar.

Hi html,

I'm glad that helped. I realised that I neglected to include the link to the difference between 'come' and 'go' when I wrote to you yesterday. If you look back at my comment, you'll see there's now a link there to a page that might be helpful. Sorry to have forgotten it!

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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