Some verbs are two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases). They consist of a verb and a particle:

  • grow + up
    >> The children are growing up.

Often this gives the verb a new meaning:

  • take + after
    >> She takes after her mother
    = She looks like her mother, or She behaves like her mother.
  • count + on
    >> I know I can count on you
    = I know I can trust you, or I know I can believe you.

Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) have only one pattern:

N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

[Note: N = noun; V = verb; p = particle]

N (Subject)  Verb Particle  N (Object)
She
I
My father
takes
can count
comes
after
on
from
her mother
you
Madrid


Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) are phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs have two different patterns:

• The usual pattern is: N + V + N + p

 

N (Subject) Verb (N) Object Particle
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours
back
over
behind

 
• But sometimes these verbs have the pattern: N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

 

N (Subject) Verb Particle N (Object)
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
back
over
behind
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours

When the object is a personal pronoun,these verbs always have the pattern:

N + V +N + p:

  • She gave back it
    >> She gave it back
  • He knocked over it
     >> knocked it over
  • We will be leaving behind them
    >> We will be leaving them behind

• Phrasal verbs are nearly always made up of a transitive verb and a particle. Common verbs with their most frequent particles are:

bring: about, along, back, forward, in, off, out, round, up
buy: out, up
call: off, up
carry: off, out
cut: back, down, off, out, up
give: away, back, off
hand: back, down, in, on out, over, round
knock: down, out, over
leave: behind, out
let: down, in, off, out
pass: down, over, round
point: out
push: about, around, over
put: across, away, down, forward, off, on, out, through, together, up
read: out
set: apart, aside, back, down
shut: away, in, off, out
take: apart, away, back, down, in, on, up, over
think: over, through, up
   





 

 

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Hello again,
Kindly correct if there's a mistake or please give me the correct grammar.

''...from what they have been used to before''

(To make it more clear, a situation when someone cannot do the same thing from what they have been doing before, like celebrities)

Hello Aoll212,

I think the past simple ('were used to') is more likely here as 'used to' refers to finished past time. However, the context is key.

Please note that we do not generally provide a checking or correcting service for users. We're happy to comment on our own material and provide general help with English but with so many users it's not possible for us to check language in this way.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Ops sry about that, but still I thank you very much.

Dear sir,
Please CORRECT me
In the fourth semester of the course , the attendance fell down.(is it correct)

Hello Tapan100,

We would not use 'down' here. When describing statistical trends the verb 'fall' is used on its own:

In the fourth semester of the course the attendance fell.

Please note that we do not generally provide a correction service for our users. We have many thousands of users and simply cannot offer such a service on demands, as I'm sure you can understand.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

It's good

Hello, I want to learn further about phrasal verbs using (verb)+out, and (verb)+up, when do we use "up" and "out" in a sentence like -gather up guys, we need to commence what we have started.- thank you.

Hello Aoll212,

I'm afraid we don't have material specifically devoted to phrasal verbs with a particular particle. Our materials are organised so that either the topic of phrasal verbs or multi-word verbs is the focus, or a communicative theme is the focus, with phrasal verbs used for that topic (as here or here, for example).

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Aoll212,

Although there are some patterns in the way particles (e.g. 'out' and 'up') are used in phrasal verbs, there are so many exceptions and different meanings I'm afraid it's not possible to generalise about them. You might want to do an internet search for resources specialised in phrasal verbs -- this BBC page and this other BBC page might be good places to start -- or look for books designed to help you learn phrasal verbs for more information.

Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thx, you helped me guys a lot.

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