The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask about the following:
When someone prefers to live in a city instead of the countryside, we say that he/she is a city person?
And when someone prefers to live in the countryside, we say that this person is a countryman or woman?
Thank you in advance

Sir,
We say 'See for yourself when we want someone to see something themselves or by themselves, but when we want someone to hear something themselves,
Do we say 'Hear it for yourself or Listen to it for yourself or do we just omit the word 'For' ?

I call in a radio station and talk to a Rj but when it's been sometime for him to have come on the show I get nervous while calling in the radio station and talking to him.
Now I think it's correct to write 'when it's been sometime for him to have come' rather than writing 'when it's sometime for him to have come'

'What time did you live for home at,
What time did you live at for home'
Which one is more appropriate and acceptable ?

Thanks a lot,Kirk,for your reply!
Now as I've got your answer I see that I made a mistake. When I was writing 'wouldn't'(option 2) I meant 'won't' !
All the best !

Hello again,Team!
What are the correct ways of expressing oneself in the following situation:
For example I see some box on the shelf which may fall down any moment,I push it inside and ,by way of explaining my action to the other person who is looking at me , say:
1. So(that) it doesn't fall.
2. So(that) it wouldn't fall.
3. Just to keep it from falling.

I suspect there are many ways to explain my action,but what are the most natural in conversational English?
And ,of course, it's possible to say it in short form, just 'So that it doesn't fall' instead of ' I have pushed it inside so that it doesn't fall' ?
And,is it possible to omit 'that' here, if this expression is acceptable at all in the case?

Hi Slava B,

I would probably say 1. You could say it with or without 'that' and it would be correct. If you were referring to a future time, for example, when your kids come home in an hour, you could say 'so it won't fall', or I might say something like 'I don't want it to fall' or 'To keep it from falling' (your number 3). Your second sentence could perhaps be used in a specific context, but in general 1 and 3 are more likely.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I would like to ask about the following:
If we write a letter or email we can write the following;
Hello, how are you? As for me, I am ok
Can we start with the phrase as for me, if we want to say things about ourselves? ? are there any alternative ways?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

Yes, that is correct. It's a little unusual to use 'as for' in informal speaking or writing, but it sounds all right to me here.

I'd probably write 'How are you? I'm doing fine.' Perhaps if I wrote more questions asking my friend about how they are doing and then started a new paragraph about me I'd be more apt to use 'as for'. It's difficult to say for sure without knowing what comes before and after in the text, what my intentions are, etc., but I hope that gives you an idea.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct;
My enthusiasms and curiosity help me to do this job as a designer
1. my enthusiasms is correct? word order is correct?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

When 'enthusiasm' means 'energetic interest', it is used in the singular; it can be used in the plural when it refers to an activity you enjoy. I'm not sure which meaning you want to use here, but I'm guessing it might be the first. If I'm right about that, it should be singular. If you are actually referring to activities, I might suggest changing the word to 'hobbies' or 'interests', as the use of 'enthusiasms' in this context is unusual.

The word order is correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Thank you for your reply. In fact, I would like to talk about both words; enthusiasm and enthusiasms.
While enthusiasm is clear to me, enthusiasms is a .a word that I don't know how to use it. For example my enthusiasms to try new hobbies such as dancing, music etc made me to become a musician. Is it ok to use the word here?
Thank you in advance

Pages