In this video, four Premier League players talk about how they use English and why it is important to them.

Instructions

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video and do the Tasks. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Task 1

Collocations

Choose the correct word to complete each phrase. Careful! One phrase has no missing word. For this phrase, choose '-'.

Exercise

Task 2

Who said what?

In this activity, you have to read a quote from the video and select the player who said it.

Exercise

Task 3

Sentences

Rearrange the words to make sentences.

Exercise

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Tags

Comments

Hello jessica,

It is a reduced relative clause and a present participle phrase. That is, one way to reduce a relative clause is by using a present participle phrase. See our Quick Grammar page on this topic for other ways you can reduce relative clauses.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

1. I don't want to give any answer to you .
2. I don't want to give you any answer .

Which one seems more accurate ?

Hello jessica_22,

Both are grammatically acceptable but the second one is the more common form in modern English.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

It is 23rd July and a newspaper headline is given below
Man found murdered in Apartment . He would have turned 65 on July 29.

Now the question is why they use 'would have turned' instead of using 'will have turned' if they are talking about future tense . Because 29th july is about to come , it hasn't passed yet .
As far as i know it may be because of conditional sentence but i am not sure about it . Still if i try to rewrite last line using conditional sentence then i will write it as follows
He would have turned 65 on july 29 had he been alive .
This is the case of third conditional sentence. But it doesn't make sense because third conditional sentences are used for the unreal past events (The events that didn't happen).
Could it be the case of mixed conditional sentence ? If so , pls help me to rewrite this sentence using mixed conditional .

Hello jessica_22,

There are many ways to formulate the sentence. For example, we could say:

He would have turned 65 if he had not been murdered.

This is, of course, a third conditional. On the 29th We could also say:

He would be 65 today if he had not been murdered.

This is a mixed (second and third) conditional.

The sentence He would have turned 65 on July 29 if he had not been murdered is used because the speaker is projecting his or her perspective into the future, imagining looking back from that date. The same thing could be said with a second conditional:

He would turn 65 on July 29 if he were still alive

 

I hope that clarifies it for you. There are often multiple ways to describe a given situation and the choice of which form we use is often a question of perspective and emphasis, rather than objective time.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

One of my friend has become an engineer . On her success i want to wish her . I tried to write a sentence but while writing it , a doubt arised in my mind . Here it is

"'Many Many congratulations on YOUR/YOURS becoming an engineer".
As far as i know ' becoming" is a gerund here and if a noun/pronoun comes before gerund , it should be used in possessive case . So 'yours' should be used here . But i am not sure . It would be great if you tell me what actually should be used here .

Hello jessica_22,

The possessive adjective 'your' is required here. We use 'your' before a noun or gerund. We use 'yours' when there is no noun. For example:

Is this your pen? [with a noun - pen]

Is this yours? [without a noun]

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Look at this sentence

It is the story of a 13-year old tribal girl from Delhi who created history in 2014 BY BECOMING the youngest girl in the world to scale the Mount Everest .

Can we use only 'Becoming' instead of 'By Becoming' ? If so , will the sentence carry same meaning as earlier .

Hello jessica,

I suppose that you could change the sentence to '... in 2014, becoming the youngest ...', but I wouldn't recommend it. First of all, participle clauses are rather formal, and the style of the rest of the sentence (e.g. 'It is the story of ...') is rather informal, or neutral at best. Also, the subjects of the two clauses are not the same – the girl should ideally be the subject of both clauses.

Have you considered taking a class or working with a teacher? Our primary purpose here at LearnEnglish is to help our users navigate and use the site. We're happy to answer questions such as yours from time to time, but it seems as if you're looking for in-depth tutorial, which I'm afraid we're not able to provide.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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