in spite of / despite / although

In spite of, despite and although are all used to show a contrast but there are differences in the structures used with them.

In spite of / despite

After in spite of and despite we use a noun or a pronoun.

  • We enjoyed our camping holiday in spite of the rain.
  • Despite the pain in his leg he completed the marathon.
  • Despite having all the necessary qualifications, they didn’t offer me the job.

Remember that the gerund (‘-ing’ form) is the ‘noun’ form of a verb.

The only difference between in spite of and despite is the ‘of’.

  • Despite of the bad weather, there was a large crowd at the match.

Although

After although we use a subject and a verb.

  • We enjoyed our camping holiday although it rained every day.
  • Although he worked very hard, he didn’t manage to pass the exam.
  • The holiday was great although the hotel wasn’t very nice.

We can use in spite of and despite with a subject and verb if we include the expression ‘the fact that’.

  • In spite of the fact that he worked very hard, he didn’t manage to pass the exam.
  • Despite the fact that he worked very hard, he didn’t manage to pass the exam.

Even though

Even though is a slightly stronger form of although.

  • We decided to buy the house even though we didn’t really have enough money.
  • You keep making that stupid noise even though I’ve asked you to stop three times.

Like although, even though is followed by a subject and a verb.

 

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Hello SatyaD,

I'm afraid we don't provide an answer service for tasks from elsewhere or from homework or tests! If we tried then we would never have time for any other work. I can say, however, that the sentence does not look a grammatically correct sentence to me whichever option is chosen.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

(1) Although the boy has fever , yet he will take part in the competition.
(2) Although the goal-keeper was responsible for the defeat in the important football match , nobody blamed him.
I think both sentence correct but confused without 'yet' is the second sentence gramatically correct, need explanation

Hello Tapan100,

The second sentence is correct, but the first needs to be changed. We would generally use either 'although' or 'yet', but not both together:

Although the boy has fever, he will take part in the competition.

The boy has fever, yet he will take part in the competition.

The sentence with 'yet' here is more formal and literary-sounding.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Despite the fact that I am working, I feels so sleepy.

Although I was tired i am working full today.

you are not able to get out me of your life although I love you so much. '' although or anothers ?

Hello alixmanx,

I'm afraid I don't understand what you want to say well enough to be able to help very much with this sentence. One correction is to change the first part to 'get me out of your life'. 'although' doesn't really make sense to me, but I don't know what you want to say, so it's difficult to suggest another word. Perhaps 'because'?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you very much everyone who share here....

Despite of the bad weather, there was a large crowd at the match.
- this doesn't look like a correct sentence to me
I would delete the word "of" in this case

Hello swiftyswifty,

That's correct – the word 'of' is not correct here.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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