in spite of / despite / although

In spite of, despite and although are all used to show a contrast but there are differences in the structures used with them.

In spite of / despite

After in spite of and despite we use a noun or a pronoun.

  • We enjoyed our camping holiday in spite of the rain.
  • Despite the pain in his leg he completed the marathon.
  • Despite having all the necessary qualifications, they didn’t offer me the job.

Remember that the gerund (‘-ing’ form) is the ‘noun’ form of a verb.

The only difference between in spite of and despite is the ‘of’.

  • Despite of the bad weather, there was a large crowd at the match.

Although

After although we use a subject and a verb.

  • We enjoyed our camping holiday although it rained every day.
  • Although he worked very hard, he didn’t manage to pass the exam.
  • The holiday was great although the hotel wasn’t very nice.

We can use in spite of and despite with a subject and verb if we include the expression ‘the fact that’.

  • In spite of the fact that he worked very hard, he didn’t manage to pass the exam.
  • Despite the fact that he worked very hard, he didn’t manage to pass the exam.

Even though

Even though is a slightly stronger form of although.

  • We decided to buy the house even though we didn’t really have enough money.
  • You keep making that stupid noise even though I’ve asked you to stop three times.

Like although, even though is followed by a subject and a verb.

 

Exercise

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SALAM.

Sir
is there any rules regarding correct preposition use?

kingly guide me please !!!!!

Verb "DRAG " belongs to regular verb or irregular.

regards
#SA

Hello ALSYED,

'Drag' is regular, but doubles the consonant in the past:

drag - dragged - dragged

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi!

I need your help. I read a sentence: Despite enjoying working with her peers

Which v-ing functions as the noun?

Hello jojo1708,

I'm not an expert at syntax or parsing sentences – that's not really our purpose here at LearnEnglish – but I'd say that both 'enjoying' and 'working' are verbal nouns. But if I had to choose one, I'd say 'working', as the object of 'enjoying'.

I hope this helps.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Which one is right? Please explain.
Government's duty
OR
Duty of government

Hello Arvind Kumar Singh,

Both are correct, and have the same meaning. The second is perhaps more formal and more likely in formal writing.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello dear Peter,
I'm so sorry I didn't know this point that I must just ask about the materials on the page,however, my previous question was about the materials (Although) mentioned on this page but I didn't get help !

anyway, thanks a lot for your valuable team work here, I've learnt a lot from you and your friends.

best regards,

Mohsen

Hello everyone,

" Bored with the grown-up conversation, little Amy fell asleep under the kitchen table."
could you please help me with finding the complete subject and the complete predicate in this sentence.

Best wishes
Mohsen

Hello Mohsen.k77,

I'm afraid we don't help with questions such as this from homework or other similar tasks. Our focus is on helping users with the material on the site and with some questions about language, but not doing these kinds of tasks.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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