London has some of the world’s most famous department stores: Harrods, Selfridges, Fortnum & Mason, Harvey Nichols and many others. Our presenter Richard visits them and also samples a smaller shop for a range of shopping experiences.

Task 1

In what order did Richard look at the following products?

Exercise

Task 2

What's special about each shop or area?

Exercise

Task 3

Match the beginnings and ends of these phrases.

Exercise

Task 4

Richard said "If only they had it in my size". Type the correct form of the verb in the gap. Make it negative if necessary. 

We have a page on LearnEnglish about the use of 'if only'.

Exercise

Discussion

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Language level

Advanced: C1
Upper intermediate: B2

Comments

Hello,
I have two questions from Shopping is GREAT - Part 1.

At Hamleys, Richard says "now you are talking" after mentioning how big it is. What does it mean in this context?

Describing Lock’s, Richard says "Lock's sell that must-have in gentlemen’s fashion: the hat!". The verb sell needs subject and object but I cannot find either in this sentence. Especially I am confused with the use of that. It seems to me this whole sentence just does not make sense. Can you analyze its structure?

Thank you.

Hello Youngdan,

People generally say 'now you're talking' to show they are excited about something, in this case, going into the shop. It means something like 'this is going to be great' here.

Sure, in that sentence 'Lock's' is the subject (it is the name of the shop) and 'sell' is the verb. It is plural because it is a group of people who work in the shop; in British English, it is common to use a plural verb to refer to a group of people (e.g. the sales team in a shop, a football team, the government, etc.). The object is 'must-have', which is a product that is so popular that people feel they must have it. In this case, 'that' is a determiner modifying 'must-have' and is used to refer to something that is already known about. Actually, Richard hasn't spoken about hats before this point, but by using 'that', he's showing that there is a common attitude that men must have a hat if they are fashionable. That's not actually true, but he is playing the role of someone who is fashionable, and so he speaks this way.

You're right, this is actually a very complex sentence to understand! I hope this helps.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

As far as I'm concerned in London is an Olympic-sized shopping centre but here in Mexico City has a variety of stores depending on what you are going to buy. Because we have entire streets or avenue of a different kind of goods or stuff in different moments of the year or even all year long. Also, here in Mexico City every certain day of the week you can go to an specific place to get some goods near the place where you live, so it's like shops are coming to us.
In London as in many parts of the world you can expect to see shops where even royalty shop there, an here in Mexico city isn't the difference.
We can see on the avenues with markets of specific good, and also they are pride themselves on their quality and personal service .

Well, I don't usually go shopping, because I prefer shopping online. But I know that here in my city there are some nice stores. Like in Britain, we have both large and small stores. We have big shopping centers and department stores too. The main problem with shopping here in Brazil is pricing. Thanks to the taxes, things here are too expensive.

wow!! there is a massive varaity of shopping centers, I wish I had all those astonishing mega malls in my country. I am sure it would be an unforgettable experience!!

Hello The LearnEnglish Team,

I wonder if you could tell me the correct answer for the following question from the My Online Resources:
If only my parents ______ (nag) me to do my homework all the time.

I think the correct answer should be 'had nagged', but the system marked it incorrect. Then, I put 'nagged', wrong again. After that, I've tried 'didn't nag', 'would nag', 'hadn't nag', and 'nag', but nothing worked. Since there is no correct answer provided, I'm really puzzled. Could there be an error in the system's answer? And what is the correct answer?

Looking forwards to hearing from you soon.

Hi A-S,

I'm afraid I don't see the sentence you ask about in any of the tasks on this page. It seems that it should be in Task 4, but I don't see it there. Could you please tell me where you see it?

In any case, 'had nagged' (or 'hadn't nagged') seems to be the best answer to me. If you can tell me which task this sentence is found in, I would be grateful and certainly will fix it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Kirk,

Thanks for your support and given answer! It's clear my doubt.
The question isn't from Learn English section, but from My Online Resources section of My Class, which is in the Hypothetical situations 1 B of the Try it out Practice. I'm sorry to have confused and troubled you.

Many thanks again.

Best regards,
A-S

I have a query about the last question in Part 4: "If only you...angry". The answer states that the correct formulation is 'hadn't got' or 'had not got'. However, this sounds very stilted for me, and when speaking, native English speakers would say 'hadn't gotten angry', as it flows better. In such a situation, where the 'correct' formulaion differs from the 'everyday', colloquial formulation, would you acccept the colloquial formulation, and if not, why not?

Hello Calanteli,

'Gotten' is the equivalent of 'got' (past participle) in certain dialects of US English. but it is not used in British English. The phrase 'hadn't got' is not formal-sounding to my ear. A more formal equivalent would be the uncontracted 'had not got'. You could also use a more formal-sounding verb ('had not become').

None of these forms are incorrect. It is simply a question of appropriacy and to judge whether or not something is appropriate we need to know the context in which it is used, the relationships of the speakers and so on.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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