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Determiners and quantifiers

Determiners and quantifiers are words we use in front of nouns. We use determiners to identify things (this book, my sister) and we use quantifiers to say how much or how many (a few people, a lot of problems).

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how determiners and quantifiers are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Comments

Hi,
Please let me know whether the use of 'THE' before 'blue and white' in the following sentence is correct.

" I request you to change the category of the card from the blue to the white."

.Here, the color of the card indicates the level of service offered to the customers of a public distribution system.

Hi p t balagopal,

No, it should be without the both times. Normally we don't put the article before the names of colours, unless there's another noun (e.g. the blue category / the blue one).

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
Thank you Are these nouns [ category or one ] implied after blue and white? Or is it that "THE' must not be added If they are not mentioned at all?

Hi p t balagopal,

Yes, blue and white clearly refer to category in that sentence, but it would be very unusual to use the. In fact, I understand blue and white as adjectives here (not nouns).

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,

Thanks. Your comment has cleared all my doubts.

Hi,
I am very confused about the use of 'THE' in the following sentence.

" The stars seem very beautiful tonight".

Could you please explain?

Hello p t balagopal,

The speaker is talking about the stars that are visible tonight (which are not all the stars in the universe). The person they are speaking to is probably also looking at the stars. By using 'the', the speaker shows that they are confident that the listener knows which specific group of stars (in this case, the group of stars seems to be all the stars they can see in the sky at that time, on that night, in that particular place) they are talking about.

The sentence 'Stars are very beautiful tonight' wouldn't be correct because there is a conflict: 'stars' refers to all the stars that exist in the universe, but 'tonight' limits the sentence to talking only about the stars visible in that specific situation.

'Stars are very beautiful' is a correct sentence. It is a general statement not limited to a particular situation.

I hope that helps you make sense of it.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
Thanks a lot. Your answer has cleared all my doubts.

Which is correct, at or on?

Lessons on The LearnEnglish are very useful.
Lessons at The LearnEnglish are very useful.

Hello. I want to ask a question. I have to take an exam next summer and I can't find anything about the omission of the article and the subject. Can I receive a piece of guidance?

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