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'still' and 'no longer', 'already' and 'yet'

Level: beginner

still

We use still to show that something continues up to a time in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

Even when my father was 65, he still enjoyed playing tennis.
It's past midnight but she's still doing her homework.
I won't be at work next week. We'll still be on holiday.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Her grandfather has been very ill, but he is still alive.
We tried to help them, but they were still unhappy.

no longer

We use no longer to show the idea of something stopping in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

At that moment, I realised that I no longer loved him.
We no longer live in England. We've moved to France.
From midnight tonight, Mr Jones will no longer be the president.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Sadly, Andrew and Bradley are no longer friends. They had an argument.
It was no longer safe to stay in the country. We had to leave immediately.

In a negative sentence, we use any longer or any more. It goes at the end of the sentence:

We don't live in England any longer.
It wasn't safe to stay in the country any more.

still and no longer 1

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still and no longer 2

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already

We use already to show that something has happened sooner than it was expected to happen. It goes in front of the main verb:

The car is OK. I've already fixed it.
It was early but they were already sleeping.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

It was early but we were already tired.
We are already late.

Sometimes already comes at the end of the sentence for emphasis:

It's very early but they are sleeping already.
It was early but we were tired already.
When we got there, most people had arrived already.

yet

We use yet in a negative or interrogative clause, usually with perfective aspect (especially in British English), to show that something has not happened by a particular time. yet comes at the end of a sentence:

It was late, but they hadn't arrived yet.
Have you fixed the car yet?
She won't have sent the email yet.

already and yet

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Comments

Hello Agnes,

No, neither 'have yet to' nor 'be yet to' are used with 'not', so the sentence you ask about is not correct.

Both 'The President and her husband have yet to arrive' and the same sentence with 'are yet to' mean 'They haven't arrived yet'. As you can see, they are basically equivalent to the present perfect in the negative, and imply that the action is expected. As far as I know 'have yet to' is more common (though not very common, as both forms are really quite formal) than 'is/are yet to' and they mean the same thing.

If you want to know more about them, please consult a corpus such as the NOW Corpus. For example, write 'have yet to' in the search box, press the 'Find matching strings' button, then press the 'HAVE YET TO' on the next page and you'll see thousands examples of how it's used. You can do the same with 'are yet to' or any other word or phrase you'd like to understand better.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Agnes,

As far as I can think, 'have not yet to' and 'is not yet to' are not used. That's right: neither 'have yet to' nor 'be yet to' are used with 'not'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Agnes,

Traditionally, 'neither A nor B' is followed by a singular verb, but in an informal style people often use a plural verb. I wasn't even thinking about it when I wrote my response, and used an informal style. But you could also use 'is' instead of 'are' in my sentence and it would be fine.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

already, still, yet and no longer...

Where is the last one?... Seems to be no longer here :)

Hi there,
It depends on what you mean "the last one" here. Owing to the "last" word is a sort of contronym.
E.g there are 3 main opposite meanings for last as following link
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/last
In the same line with "yet" as well!
Tks!

Hello Jarek_O,

Thanks for pointing this out to us! I'm afraid I'll have to look into that more carefully to find out what happened, which will take me some time. For now, you could look at the Cambridge Dictionary entry. Although it doesn't say much, there are a couple of examples and then you're welcome to ask us any questions you may have here.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

It was late, but they hadn’t arrived yet. or it was late. but they did not arrived yet.

which one correct those sentence. pls confirm.

Hello taj25,

The first sentence ('hadn't arrived') is correct as the action of (not) arriving is earlier than the statement that it is late and has an influence on it.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi. I just wanna ask if which is more accurate sentence between on this.''I ain't yet worth living for.'' and ''I ain't worth yet living for.''

Hello Gimson,

'yet' should go immediately after 'ain't': 'I ain't yet worth ...'

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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