Level: beginner

Verbs in English have four basic parts:

 Base form   -ing form    Past tense   Past participle 
work working worked worked
play playing played played
listen listening listened listened

Most verbs are regular: they have a past tense and past participle with –ed (worked, played, listened). But many of the most frequent verbs are irregular.

Level: beginner

Basic parts

Verbs in English have four basic parts:

 Base form   -ing form    Past tense   Past participle 
work working worked worked
play playing played played
listen listening listened listened

Most verbs are regular: they have a past tense and past participle with –ed (worked, played, listened). But many of the most frequent verbs are irregular.

Verb phrases

Verb phrases in English have the following forms:

  1. main verb:
  main verb  
We are here.
I like it.
Everybody saw the accident.
We laughed.  

The verb can be in the present tense (are, like) or the past tense (saw, laughed).

  1. the auxiliary verb be and a main verb in the –ing form:
  auxiliary be -ing form
Everybody is watching.
We were laughing.

A verb phrase with be and –ing expresses continuous aspect. A verb with am/is/are expresses present continuous and a verb with was/were expresses past continuous.

  1. the auxiliary verb have and a main verb in the past participle form:
  auxiliary have past participle  
They have enjoyed themselves.
Everybody has worked hard.
He had finished work.

A verb phrase with have and the past participle expresses perfect aspect. A verb with have/has expresses present perfect and a verb with had expresses past perfect.

  1. modal verb (can, could, may, might, must, shall, should, will, would) and a main verb:
  modal verb main verb
They will come.
He might come.
The verb phrase 1

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The verb phrase 2

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Level: intermediate

  1. the auxiliary verbs have and been and a main verb in the –ing form:
  auxiliary have been -ing form  
Everybody has been working hard.
He had been singing.  

A verb phrase with have been and the -ing form expresses both perfect aspect and continuous aspect. A verb with have/has expresses present perfect continuous and a verb with had expresses past perfect continuous.

  1. a modal verb and the auxiliaries be, have and have been:
  modal auxiliary verb
They will be listening.
He might have arrived.
She must have been listening.
  1. the auxiliary verb be and a main verb in the past participle form:
  auxiliary be past participle  
English is spoken all over the world.
The windows have been cleaned.  
Lunch was being served.  
The work will be finished soon.
They might have been invited to the party.

A verb phrase with be and the past participle expresses passive voice.

The verb phrase 3

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The verb phrase 4

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Level: advanced

We can use the auxiliaries do and did with the infinitive for emphasis:

It was a wonderful party. I did enjoy it.
I do agree with you. I think you are absolutely right.

We can also use do for polite invitations:

Do come and see us some time.
There will be lots of people there. Do bring your friends.

Comments

Sir,
We ask somebody, How did get interested in this or what interested you in this or what got you interested in this.
different ways to ask the same thing.

I want to know if we can also ask the same thing with same meaning like this:
What makes you interested in this ?

Hello SonuKumar

Probably the most common way to say this is 'How did you get interested in this?' or 'How did you get into this?' ('to get into something' means to become interested in something). You could say 'What makes you interested in cars?' but it's more natural to use one of the other suggestions I made above.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

School reopens tomorrow.
School will reopen tomorrow.

Which one is the correct way?

Hello Mano Nedunchezhian,
Both sentences are grammatically correct. Which one you choose will depend upon the context and the speaker's intention.
We would use the present simple ('reopens') when the event is part of a calendar or schedule. We would use will ('will reopen') when we are describing a decision or making a guess or prediction about the future.
You can read more about ways to talking about the future on this page:
https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar-reference/talkin...
~
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks Peter!

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct : can we say are you offering math lessons?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,
Yes, that is correct. In British English we would say 'maths' and in US English they say 'math'.
~
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
To my friend, I forgot to give the keys to open the door and he asked me why I hadn't give him the keys.
My reply to him was I forgot to do that or so.
But I could have also said "that's what I forget" or "To give you or giving you the keys is what I forgot (to do)". Could I not ?

Hello SonuKumar
You could possibly say 'That's what I forgot to do', but I think it would be much clearer to say 'Sorry, I forgot to give them to you' or 'Sorry, I forgot'. 'Giving you the keys is what I forgot to do' is grammatically correct, but it's not appropriate for an apology -- it's more of a description than an apology.
All the best
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Peter & Kirk,

I am back to your website again.

Sorry, but my question is off topic but still under the umbrella of a much more bigger topic which is the verbs. I can't seem to find any lesson about subject-verb agreement. Has there been any discussion made about it?

I really want to read it, and maybe ask few questions about it.

Thank you!

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