Level: intermediate

Two adjectives

We often have two adjectives in front of a noun:

a handsome young man
a big black car
that horrible big dog

Some adjectives give a general opinion. We can use these adjectives to describe almost any noun:

good
bad
lovely
strange
nice
beautiful
brilliant
excellent
awful
important
wonderful
nasty

He's a good/wonderful/brilliant/bad/dreadful teacher.

That's a good/wonderful/brilliant/bad/dreadful book.

Some adjectives give a specific opinion. We only use these adjectives to describe particular kinds of noun, for example:

Food Furniture, buildings People, animals
delicious
tasty
comfortable
uncomfortable
clever
intelligent
friendly

We usually put a general opinion in front of a specific opinion:

nice tasty soup
a nasty uncomfortable armchair

a lovely intelligent animal

We usually put an opinion adjective in front of a descriptive adjective:

a nice red dress
a silly old man
those horrible yellow curtains

Order of adjectives 1

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Order of adjectives 2

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Adjectives after link verbs

We use some adjectives only after a link verb:

afraid
alive
alone
asleep
content
glad
ill
ready
sorry
sure
unable
well

Some of the commonest -ed adjectives are normally used only after a link verb:

annoyed
bored
finished
pleased
thrilled

We say:

Our teacher was ill.
My uncle was very glad when he heard the news.
The policeman seemed to be very annoyed.

but we do not say:

We had an ill teacher.
When he heard the news he was
a very glad uncle.
He seemed to be a very annoyed policeman.

Order of adjectives 3

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Level: advanced

Three or more adjectives

Sometimes we have three adjectives in front of a noun, but this is unusual:

a nice handsome young man     
a big black American car     
that horrible big fierce dog

It is very unusual to have more than three adjectives.

Adjectives usually come in this order:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
General opinion Specific opinion Size Shape Age Colour Nationality Material
Order of adjectives 4­

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Adjectives in front of nouns

A few adjectives are used only in front of a noun:

north
south
east
west

northern
southern
eastern
western
countless
occasional
lone
mere
indoor
outdoor


 

We say:

He lives in the eastern district.
There were countless problems with the new machinery.

but we do not say:

The district he lives in is eastern.
The problems with the new machinery were countless.

Comments

Hello Team!
I have a question.

Do these two sentences have same meaning "Find someone as wild as you run with","Find someone just as wild to run with you"?
Thank you!

Hello Goktung123,

The first sentence has a mistake. It should be '...as you to run with'.

 

In terms of meaning there is only one distinction.

The first sentence makes it clear that the point of comparison is 'you': ...someone as wild as you...

The second sentence leaves this ambiguous: ...someone just as wild (as who?)...

 Of course, the context may make this clear.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Peter thank you for your kind help!
ActualIy I thought if "to run" modifies "wild" in the second sentence.(how wild(quantity) he/she is)
For example,we can say,"He/she is brave enough to run with me"
Can we do that kind of comparison with "as adj as or just as adj" ?
Thank you!

Hello Goktug123

I hope you don't mind me answering for Peter. I'm not completely sure I understand your question, but let me answer what I think you are asking about.

The 'as + adj + as' structure does quantify the adjective, but this quantification is relative to another person. In 'She is just as brave as me', 'me' is this reference point, but if you don't mention who the other person is after the second 'as', then it must be understood from context -- for example, maybe the sentences before explain who this person is and how brave they are. There must be another person whose bravery is described for this structure to make sense.

'She is brave enough to run with me' also quantifies 'her' bravery, but her bravery is not compared to my bravery -- it is relative to whatever it is about my running that requires bravery. Again, this has to be understood from the context.

I hope this answers your question, but if not, please ask again, making your question as specific as possible.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Is the use of the adjective 'required' correct in the following sentence?
"The man got such dams built that its water comes in the field only as per required."

Hello Zeeshan Siddiqii,

The correct form here would be as required, without 'per'. I would suggest one or two other changes to make the sentence more natural:

The man had dams built in such a way that the water comes into the field only as required.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Helpful. Thanks

Hello team!
Do these sentences have same meaning?
"I took the printed photos"
"I took the photos printed"
Are words of "printed" in these sentences adjective?

Thank you!

Hello Goktug123

Yes, that's right, 'printed' is an adjective here. In general, adjectives go before the noun they modify, so the first sentence is correct and the second one is not.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Kirk!

We can say "I took the photos that had been printed".
But as you say, we can't say "I took the photos printed" Do we always have to use long form?

Or, for example, we can say "I took the photos that had been printed on papers".And the short form of this sentence, "I took the photos printed on papers."

Could you please tell me what the difference is?

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