Pronouns are words we use in the place of a full noun.

There are many different kinds of pronouns.

Comments

Hi Sir!
Thanks for the response to my question. I can now use the both.

Thanks million sir. Your answer lives up to my satisfaction. I'm learning a lot from you.
I am confused between this these two words:
Alone, lone , and how to properly use them in the sentence.
Which one is correct and why:
He has done it alone
He has done it lone.
Thanks for the help.

Hello hawa100,

'Lone' is an adjective which is used only before a noun: a lone wolf, a lone hunter, a lone protester.

'Alone' as an adjective is used only in two ways. First, after the verb 'be': I was alone in the house. Second, after a noun to mean 'only': She alone knows the truth.

'Alone can also be an adverb: I worked alone all night.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
Could I say that "My Aim in life" might be a multiple purpose in my life but "The Aim of my life" specified or just one purpose in life?

Hello Imran 26,

No, both phrases refer to a single (or most important) aim. You would use plural forms to talk about more than one aim:

My aims in life are...

The aims of my life are...

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
I am a English teacher in school, today I was dictating to my student an Essay on topic "My aim in life" .
My students say why there is preposition used "in", they say it might be " My Aim of life".
please let me know what is the correct one that I could teach them.

Hello Imran 26,

This is really a question of convention rather than rules. The phrase 'aim in life' is a common expression, as are 'purpose in life', 'goal in life' and 'ambition in life'.

You can use 'of' but note that we would then say 'the aim' (as 'of' identifies the noun) and use a possessive adjective: 'the aim of my life', 'the purpose of my life' and so on. However, as I said, 'in life' is the normal expression here.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you for being helpful. You're doing great job. I am satisfied with the answers.
I have another concern and I would appreciate it if you could help me out.
They have taught me that after the word " than" and " as" we always use the subject case.
Example:
So which of the following sentences is correct or wrong and why?
1.She is smarter than he.
2. Do as I do
3. Your job is more difficult than mine.
4. Your job is more difficult than I.
5. Your job is more difficult as mine.
6. You job is more difficult as I.
Thanks for the help.

Hello hawa100

In informal situations,normally object forms are used after 'than' and 'as' (e.g. 'She is smarter than him').

Subject forms are more common in formal situations (e.g. sentences 1 and 2). When subject forms are used, a verb often follows them (as in 2).

The subject and object forms of the possessive pronoun 'mine' are identical. Sentence 3 is therefore correct and appropriate in both formal and informal situations.

Sentences 4 and 6 do not make sense because you are comparing a job with a person.

Sentence 5 is not correct because 'as' is not used after a comparison with 'more'. You could say either 'Your job is as difficult as mine' or 'Your job is more difficult than mine', but you cannot mix these two kinds of comparison.

Hope that clears it up for you.

Best wishes

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi
What could be the opposite of 'fast colour'?

Thanks

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