A1 English level (elementary)

English level A1 describes basic users of the language. Learners at this level can communicate in everyday situations with common expressions and elementary vocabulary. The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) is the system that defines and explains the different levels of oral and written expression and comprehension for languages, including English. There are six levels of reference, divided into three blocks: basic user for levels A1 and A2, independent user for B1 and B2 and proficient user for C1 and C2.

Skills at A1 English level (elementary)

What can an A1-level learner of English do?

  • They can understand and use very common everyday expressions and simple phrases for immediate needs.
  • They can introduce themselves and other people and can ask and answer questions about personal details, such as where they live, things they have and people they know.
  • They can communicate in a simple way if the other person talks slowly and clearly.

Online courses at this level

Our online self-study, live classes and one-to-one courses with personal tutors are designed by some of the world's English teaching experts. They offer a safe and inclusive learning environment to help you improve your English and achieve your ambitions.

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Choose content at this level

Learn how to write text messages to tell a friend you're going to be late.

Learn how to write a noticeboard message.

Read an invitation to an office event to practise and improve your reading skills.

Read the poster outside an exam room to practise and improve your reading skills.

Listen to some requests from a manager to practise and improve your listening skills.

Read a menu to practise and improve your reading skills. 

Read a study timetable for a week in summer school in England to practise and improve your reading skills.

Learn how to write a text message invitation to a friend.

Learn how to write a thank-you email.

Listen to a voicemail message and answer the questions to practise your listening skills.

Do the exercises and learn the words for some common actions.

Do you know how to use adjectives with prepositions like interested in or similar to?

Do you know the difference between bored and boring?

Read an airport departures board to practise and improve your reading skills. 

Learn how to fill in an application form.

Learn how to write an email to book a hotel.

Learn how to write an email to confirm an appointment.

Learn how to write an email to congratulate a colleague.

Do you know how to use a, an and the?

Do you know when you need to use the in common phrases and place names?

Do these exercises to learn words for parts of the body.

Listen to someone booking a table in a restaurant to practise and improve your listening skills.

Read four business cards to practise and improve your reading skills.

Listen to four people talk about their jobs to practise and improve your listening skills.

In this video, Paul has problems understanding Bob. Listen to the language they use for checking understanding and practise saying the useful phrases.

Do the exercises to learn words for different kinds of clothes.

Do these exercises to learn the names of colours.

Do you know how to use a, some, any, much and many?

Do you know how to use a few, few, very little and a bit of?

Do the exercises and learn how to talk about what you do every day.