C1 English level (advanced)

English level C1 describes proficient users of the language. Learners at this level can perform complex tasks related to work and study. The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) is the system that defines and explains the different levels of oral and written expression and comprehension for languages, including English. There are six levels of reference, divided into three blocks: basic user for levels A1 and A2, independent user for B1 and B2 and proficient user for C1 and C2.

Skills at C1 English level (advanced)

What can a C1-level learner of English do?

  • They can understand a wide range of more difficult, longer texts and recognise implicit meanings. 
  • They can express themselves fluently and spontaneously with little need to search for the right expression.
  • They can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. They can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects.

Online courses at this level

Our online self-study, live classes and one-to-one courses with personal tutors are designed by some of the world's English teaching experts. They offer a safe and inclusive learning environment to help you improve your English and achieve your ambitions.

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Choose content at this level

Read a biography of mountain runner Kilian Jornet, who climbed Everest in a day, to practise and improve your reading skills.

Listen to the job interview to practise and improve your listening skills.

Learn how to write an album review.

Listen to a project management meeting to practise and improve your listening skills.

Learn how to write a report on a research study for your company.

Learn how to write a response to a complaint.

Read a text about a fungus threatening bananas to practise and improve your reading skills.

Amanda Gorman wrote her poem 'The Miracle of Morning' in the light of the Covid-19 pandemic in spring 2020. Listen to her recite it in this video.

Learn how to write an email to explain an incident to your manager.

Learn how to write a formal email to make a request.

Learn how to write an email to a friend.

Learn how to write an essay that suggests reasons for and solutions to a problem.

Listen to an interview about two books to practise and improve your listening skills.

Learn how to write an opinion essay.

When a vampire visits a young couple in love, can they – and their love – survive?

Listen to a conversation about birthday parties between three friends to practise and improve your listening skills.

October is Black History Month in the UK. Watch historian David Olusoga explain what he thinks black British history really is about.

October is Black History Month in the UK. The event recognises black people's achievements and educates people about black history.

Listen to two friends talking about a recent trip abroad to practise and improve your listening skills.

Listen to four people talking about different business challenges to practise and improve your listening skills.

Learn how to write a short biography for a conference programme.

Britain's countryside is great, rich with lakes, mountains and monuments. Richard goes to the Lake District first, before crossing the border to Wales.

Richard continues his exploration of Britain's great countryside. He sees the lakes and mountains of Scotland and two of the world's natural wonders: the Giant's Causeway in Ireland and the magnificent Durdle Door in Dorset.

From Wallace and Gromit to Ewan McGregor, Britain's cinema is great. Richard visits the London Film Museum and finds out about the facilities for making film in the UK.

Richard looks back at past masters of British creativity at Tate Britain and then comes right up to date with an introduction to Britain's great computer gaming scene.

Read a blog post about doing business in different cultures to practise and improve your reading skills.

Learn how to summarise information in a table and write a report on the main features.

Dolphins are much more intelligent than humans when it comes to fishing: they don’t even need a net. Watch this video to see how they do it.

The story of English starts more than a thousand years ago. Richard goes to the British Library to hear – and see – how the language has changed over the years.