The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Sir,
The film, which stars Tom Carter, is released on Friday.
Which stars Tom Carter is an non-defining relative clause.
But suppose that the listener or the reader didn't know about the flim alredy,
in that case, I think the same non-defing relative clause would become a defing relative clause. right ?
and in that case, would we use 'The' or 'A' before film ? because the listener or reader didn't knew which film we're talking about but, of course, we're talking about a specific flim here which stars Tom Carter.

Hello SonuKumar,

A defining relative clause would serve to distinguish the film from other films. It answers the question 'which film'. If you were talking about one film only (because, for example, you are looking at a film poster) then you would only need to say 'the film'. If there were several films then you might use the defining relative clause to identify which one (not the film starring Bob Hoskins, but the one starring Tom Carter).

The choice of 'a' or 'the' depends upon whether or not the film is unique:
> a film which stars Tom Carter... (there are several films starring Tom Carter)
> the film which stars Tom Carter... (we know exactly which film we are talking about)

Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
If I want to say someone's English is improving.
Can I also say "Your English or quality of your English is picking up" ?

Hello SonuKumar,

Yes, you can say either of these:
'Your English is picking up.'
'The quality of your English is picking up.'

Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
I was wondering if it is the right and usual way to make the passive voice sentences of the following active voice ones.

She spoke sharply to the manager.
'The manger was spoken sharply by her.'
Australia lost the cricket match by an inning.
'The cricket match was lost by Australia by an inning.'

Or Should it be like this:
The manager was given a sharp reply by her.
The cricket match was lost by Australia with an inning's difference. ?

Hello SonuKumar
In most cases, it would be unnatural to use the passive voice in these sentences. If I wanted to write them in the passive, though, I'd write them like your first versions (though you need to say 'spoken to sharply').
All the best
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct
When we have to start a new/to work in a new project without knowledge,however we have to work on it,can we use the following expression?
I have to swim in deep waters(meaning from the beggining to do things that I do not really know,ex learn something new etc)

Hello Teachers,

I have a little question about a collocation.
In my English textbook, I found the sentence “It is a TV program thirty minutes long.” But is it also right to say “It is a TV program of thirty-minute length.” ?

Best Regards

Hello YSATO201602,

Both sentences are grammatically correct but the second one would be very unusual in such a context. The construction '...of thirty-minute length' sounds very formal and even old-fashioned. It isn't a construction we would use for such an everyday situation.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Pages