The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct.
We use the verb I am fascinated with the preposition about or by? For example, can we say; I am fascinated about detecting the special features of a culture or I am fascinated by detecting..
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

We do not use about after fascinated, so by is the correct option here. It is also possible to say fascinated with. The meaning is the same as far as I am aware, but by is the more common choice. 

Often more than one preposition is possible with a given adjective (or verb). The best place to look is a good dictionary, which should list dependent or collocating prepositions.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Ηello,
I would like to ask what is the difference between touristy and touristic?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

There is a difference in meaning between these words.

Touristy is a pejorative word which describes a place whose character has been spoiled by trying to cater too much to tourists. An example would be a historic city which has too many fast-food places, too many nightclubs, and too many very expensive shops and restaurants aiming at foreign clients rather than the people who live in the city. In such a case we might say I liked the city but it's become very touristy recently.

The word touristic is a neutral word describing something related to tourism. However, it is almost never used by native speakers of English, who use the word tourist as an adjective instead. Thus, while you can say touristic excursions and touristic guides, to a native speaker these phrases sound very unnatural. We would say tourist excursions and tourist guides instead.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, I would like to ask which of the following is correct
1.Get the most out of the vibrant capital by exploring its hidden gems OR
2.Get the most out of the vibrant capital and explore its hidden gems
By exploring is correct or to explore? What is the difference in the use of this verb?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

Both forms are possible but they have different meanings.

If you say '...by exploring...' then you mean it is exploring which let's you get the most out of the capital. In other words, exploring is the method for this; if you want to get the most out of the capital then you must explore its hidden gems.

If you say '...and explore...' then you mean that getting the most out of the capital (choosing to get the most out of it) will llet you explore its hidden gems.

 

You can see the difference more clearly in this example:

Get the map by exploring the cave.

Get the map and explore the cave.

In the first sentence you explore the cave in order to find the map.

In the second sentence you first get the map and then explore the cave.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
i would like to ask the following
1. Is it correct to say; Rome, Spain(etc) outdoor beauty?
or Rome's outdoor beauty?
When we have a city that the ending is with s, for example, Paris, we say Paris' outdoor beauty?
Thank you in advance

Hello angie,

'Rome's outdoor beauty' sounds fine to me. 'Paris's outdoor beauty' (pronounced 'Parises') is also fine, though many people would probably try to avoid saying it (since it sounds a bit strange) by rephrasing it. In writing, I'd say it's fine.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I would like to ask if the following is correct as far as adjectives are concerned
a vibrant cultural city/capital
Thank you in advanced

Hello angie2,

Those adjectives look perfectly fine to me. Of course, the context will determine if they are appropriate.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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