Pronouns

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. We often use them to avoid repeating the nouns that they refer to. Pronouns have different forms for the different ways we use them. 

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how pronouns are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Hello Pavan Kaur,

Both sentences here describe an action which continues up to the present. The continous form suggests that the action is not complete - that the person will continue working at the place into the future for some time. The simple form does not tell us this. It does not mean that the speaker will no longer work at the place - they may or may not. Rather, it describes the period of time up to the moment of speaking without reference to the future. It focuses on the achievement (30 years of work) rather than the process of how that came about.

The distinction is a subtle one and can be made clearer with another example:

I've painted the kitchen.

I've been painting the kitchen.

The first sentence tells us about the achievement, and we are to understand that the kitchen is now painted.

The second sentence does not strictly tell us whether or not the kitchen is fully painted. It may be or it may not be - though most would guess that it is not finished as the speaker chose not to use a simple form. Rather, it focuses on the activity of painting. The speaker is more interested in how they look as a result (covered in paint) or how they feel (exhausted), or in explaining why they didn't do something else (go shopping, watch a film etc).

Very often both the present perfect simple and continuous can be used to describe a given situation. The choice tells us more about how the speaker sees the situation and what the speaker chooses to emphasise than anything objective about the situation.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello sir, can you please tell me if an adjective can be used interchangeably with a determiner? Example sentence: There is 'a lot of' sense in what you say. Here can 'a lot of' be said to be an adjective of quantity or is it only a determiner?

Hello Ahmandy,

In our exercises, if you complete at least one of the questions, you can then click or press the Finish button. This will show you which answers are correct and which are not. Then you can click on the See Answers button to see the correct answers.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello youngdll,

We're happy to try to help you if you ask us a specific question.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, Most of the times when you listen that song on radio, that is made to play by me or (made played by me) what should I use here and Could I also say "That get played or have played by me" "that get to or have to play by me" ?

Hello SonuKumar,

I think most people would typically say 'the song that I played'. The context makes it clear that you didn't perform the sing by singing and playing instruments.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello sir , I have a query regarding a prepositional phrase, 'in front'. Sir shouldn't we say 'look in front' rather than 'look front' ? For example : Look in front , join your hands and start the prayer.

Hello amrita_enakshi,

It's not completely clear to me what is meant here, but yes, I'd probably say 'in front' or 'in front of you' and not 'front'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, A king took sonu's bag and gave him his own bag. Now I think here 'his own bag' refers to The king's own bag doesn't it ? and is it necessary to put 'own' in this sentence ?
Sir, There was a king and probably who used to go to a slum area or who probably went to slum area, Now Could I also say that He probably would go to slum area ? which should probably be the rule of showing probability in the past for would. is it ? There's a king who probably goes to a slum area. Could I also say that who would probably go to a slum area ? which should possibly be the rule of showing probability for would in the present is it ? and yes, in both examples if they are right, so is it necessary to use 'Probably' ?
Sir, I'm little confused, His leg broke on the road in a car accident, Could I write it like this or Could I write it only like this- He broke his leg on the road in a car accident ? I wrote my first sentence like that because his leg broke accidentally, not he knowingly broke his leg ?

Hello SonuKumar,

The most natural way to say this is:

He broke his leg in a car accident.

In most contexts 'on the road' could be assumed because, generally, cars drive on roads.

The other sentence is not incorrect but is a less common way to say the same thing.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

So, Could I say to my friends "let's go to the photo studio to have our photos taken ? and are there any other options as well ? what are they ?

Hello SonuKumar,

Yes, that is grammatically correct and natural-sounding. There are almost always other ways to communicate the same idea, for example 'Let's go get our photos taken', which is really the same structure.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, Could you please tell me which verb do you use when you go to Photoshop to have some photos, Because when we go to Photoshop ? We do not photograph ourselves, but we get ourselves photographed by someone else.
Sir, "I play in the ground" "I play in the ground in India near Delhi" "I play in a ground in India" Now, is the third one with a ground right sentence and where should we use a with ground ?
Sir, "I play in the ground" "I play in the ground in India near Delhi" "I play in a ground in India" Now is the third one with a ground a right sentence or not and where should we use a with ground ?

Hello SonuKumar,

We do occasionally help our users with a specific problem in a specific sentence, but don't really provide the service of correcting users' texts, which is essentially what you're asking us to do here and in many of your comments. In this particular case, none of the sentences sound natural to me and explaining why would take quite a bit of time. It's not that we don't want to help you, but there are many other users who have questions that are directly about our site, plus all the other work that we do that you don't see.

So when we can answer your comments without needing to make extensive explanations, we'll be happy to do so, but otherwise I'm afraid we may not be able to get to them. You could always try to take a British Council class, where a teacher would be able to provide this kind of service better than we can.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, My Dad is planning to buy a mobile, and asks me to choose one of the given options and I just simply say "Dad, which should be brought it depends on you". Now Could I also say it in these manners... "Dad, which is to be brought depends on you" "Dad, which to be brought depends on you" "Dad, which to bring depends on you" which is right and acceptable and one last question is it optional to apply "It" in this sentence or not like-(Dad, which is to be brought 'it' depends on you" please help.

Hello SonuKumar,

While '...depends on you' is correct it is not the way we would express the idea in this context as it sounds rather too formal. We would say 'It's up to you which one you bring' or 'Which one you bring is up to you'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, I just say to my brother that something never exists. Now I want to say the same thing for the past, so what would be a better options for me ? "Something never exited or Something had never exited" I think first sentence should be right, Because When we talk about longer-happening or never-happening things in the past, So we should use past simple tense, Because Past perfect 'I think' should be used for one-time-compelete-happening in the past' right ? and is there any other thing what 'you think' I should know about past simple and past perfect please let me know. I'd be very grateful to you.

Hello SonuKumar,

We use verb tenses in accordance with the context and the meaning we choose to express, and I don't know enough about either in this case to be able to answer your question fully without going into a long explanation. We don't provide this kind of service, I'm afraid. But in general, yes, it sounds to me as if the past simple would be the best choice for what you describe.

I trust you've already used our Search facility to look for pages on this topic, but in case you haven't, I'd recommend our talking about the past page and the video on this Word on the Street page.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you so much Sir. I know I keep bothering but I would like to write impeccable English. So sir could you please be kind enough to help me with the following sentences: •Look there , that is an elephant. •Look there , it is an elephant. Is 'that' a demonstrative determiner and 'it' a pronoun or 'that'and 'it' are both determiners.
Thank you so much Sir. I know I keep bothering but I would like to write impeccable English. So sir could please be kind enough to help me with the following sentences: •Look there , that is an elephant. •Look there , it is an elephant. Is 'that' a demonstrative determiner and 'it' a pronoun or 'that'and 'it' are both determiners.
Sir , I have a confusion with the tense order of these sentences: They are supposed to be written in past tense or past continuous. •She said that they were moving (move) to Canada soon. •Did you know (know)where Vijay lives? He said he was coming (come) back home today.

Hello Amrita,

The verb forms in those sentences are all correct. 'were moving' and 'was coming' are past continuous and 'did ... know' is past simple. Well done!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Imran 26,

This is a difficult thing to explain well in writing, but briefly a diphthong is a sound produced by combining two or more vowels. To learn more, I'd recommend you take a look at the BBC's The Sounds of English page, where there are lots of videos that demonstrate the sounds. Start with one of the vowels pages and I expect this difference will be explained in more detail.

Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, Sometimes I get confused badly when I see the addictive more with the and it is used double in two sentences with The like- "The more money they have the more they want" or "The more you read the more You will be familiar with the spellings of English words" Now The problem is that I think these sentences could be made like this as well- "They want as much money as they have" or "You will be familiar with the spellings of English words as much as you read" Is it right ? And I also think that the same thing can't be applied if two comparative adjective are unlike like the harder and the earlier unlike the more and the more is it right ? and can it always be done with "the more and the more" I mean is "the more and the more interchangeable with as much as" always ?

Hello SonuKumar,

The meaning here is a little different to what you suggest.

The more they have, the more they want means that they are never satisfied. More money just makes them more greedy.

The more you read the more you will be familiar with the spelling of English words means that reading always improves your knowledge of this; increasing reading increases knowledge.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, Mr. Kirk! Could you tell me please how I can say the phrase: "I would hate for her to have to go there." in British English? In American English, the invinitive construction with the preposition "for" may follow such verbs as "Hate", "Like" and some others. But in British English, this construction "for her to have to go" cannot be replaced after the verbs "hate" and "like" in a sentence. In British English, these verbs may have "Complex Object" after themselves, but not such an infinitive construction as "for her to have to go". So... In American English, it sounds like: "I would hate for her to have to go there". What about British? "I would hate her to have to go there"? Or maybe "I wouldn't want her to have to go there"? Or some another option? Tell me please where I'm wrong.

Hello Dennis.Nov,

I am from the UK and I can tell you that it's perfectly fine to form a sentence like 'I would hate for her to have to go there' in British English. It is quite a formal construction but in no way incorrect.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, Peter! Thanks a lot for your answer to my question. So... Can the verbs "hate" and "like" really have such infinitive constructions with the preposition "for" in British English? What about this sentence: "They would hate for me to have to stay home tomorrow"? Is this correct, but it just sounds formal? How can I say this in an informal way? "They would hate me to have to stay home tomorrow?". Right?

Hello Dennis.Nov,

That sentence is perfectly fine, yes, and it is quite formal as you say. I think the most common way to say this in a less formal way would be to use a conditional form:

Formal: They would hate for me to have to stay home tomorrow.

Less formal: They would hate it if I had to stay home tomorrow.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, what is the difference between as to and as for, and related to and relating to ?

Hello SonuKumar,

Could you please first search for information about this in the dictionary or on the internet? Then explain to us what you understand (or don't understand), and we can help you with that.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello. Could you please tell me whether I can use the preposition "on" with the words "chair" or "seat". Can I say: "He is sitting on the chair", or it must be "in the chair"? Thanks in advance.

Hello Ellenna,

Both 'on' and 'in' are used with 'chair', though I'd say 'on' is more common. In many cases they mean the same thing, but in some specific contexts, 'on' could emphasise being on the surface of the chair, whereas 'in' could imply a chair (e.g. an armchair) that is larger and which in a sense contains the person sitting in (or 'on'!) it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, "Not as many people go to New York in summer as (go to) London" Should I use (GO TO) here or are they optional and Is it a right sentence using Not as many people if not, Please you make it for me and let me know if I could use Not that many or Not so many in this sentence ?

Hello SonuKumar,

'go to' (or also just 'go') can be omitted or can remain in this sentence and all versions are correct. This is called ellipsis.

'not that many' wouldn't be correct in this case, but 'not so many' is OK. 'not that many' means something like 'not very many' -- these are not correct in this kind of comparative structure. They are correct in other contexts, e.g. in a short answer ('How many people came to the party?' -- 'Not that many').

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, There go less people to New York than London In summer. Could I also use a small number of people or a less number of people here ? And are there any other ways to make the same sentence using as many people as or as many as people ?

Hello SonuKumar,

With 'people', which is a count noun, you should use the quantifier 'fewer' rather than 'less'. 'small' does indeed collocate with the word 'number', but 'less' does not in most cases. You could say 'not as many people' if you needed to rewrite the sentence using the word 'many'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, What is the best and more acceptable way to say this thing, ( .1 Not that many people go there, As many as come here) ( 2. There don't go there, As many people as come here) (3. There go a small number of people there than here) (4.Here come a large number of people than here) ? And tell me what mistake I'm making here forming these sentences and if all are wrong, then what is right ? Please help