Some verbs are two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases). They consist of a verb and a particle:

  • grow + up
    >> The children are growing up.

Often this gives the verb a new meaning:

  • take + after
    >> She takes after her mother
    = She looks like her mother, or She behaves like her mother.
  • count + on
    >> I know I can count on you
    = I know I can trust you, or I know I can believe you.

Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) have only one pattern:

N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

[Note: N = noun; V = verb; p = particle]

N (Subject)  Verb Particle  N (Object)
She
I
My father
takes
can count
comes
after
on
from
her mother
you
Madrid


Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) are phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs have two different patterns:

• The usual pattern is: N + V + N + p

 

N (Subject) Verb (N) Object Particle
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours
back
over
behind

 
• But sometimes these verbs have the pattern: N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

 

N (Subject) Verb Particle N (Object)
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
back
over
behind
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours

When the object is a personal pronoun,these verbs always have the pattern:

N + V +N + p:

  • She gave back it
    >> She gave it back
  • He knocked over it
     >> knocked it over
  • We will be leaving behind them
    >> We will be leaving them behind

• Phrasal verbs are nearly always made up of a transitive verb and a particle. Common verbs with their most frequent particles are:

bring: about, along, back, forward, in, off, out, round, up
buy: out, up
call: off, up
carry: off, out
cut: back, down, off, out, up
give: away, back, off
hand: back, down, in, on out, over, round
knock: down, out, over
leave: behind, out
let: down, in, off, out
pass: down, over, round
point: out
push: about, around, over
put: across, away, down, forward, off, on, out, through, together, up
read: out
set: apart, aside, back, down
shut: away, in, off, out
take: apart, away, back, down, in, on, up, over
think: over, through, up
   





 

 

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Hello, I want to learn further about phrasal verbs using (verb)+out, and (verb)+up, when do we use "up" and "out" in a sentence like -gather up guys, we need to commence what we have started.- thank you.

Hello Aoll212,

I'm afraid we don't have material specifically devoted to phrasal verbs with a particular particle. Our materials are organised so that either the topic of phrasal verbs or multi-word verbs is the focus, or a communicative theme is the focus, with phrasal verbs used for that topic (as here or here, for example).

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Aoll212,

Although there are some patterns in the way particles (e.g. 'out' and 'up') are used in phrasal verbs, there are so many exceptions and different meanings I'm afraid it's not possible to generalise about them. You might want to do an internet search for resources specialised in phrasal verbs -- this BBC page and this other BBC page might be good places to start -- or look for books designed to help you learn phrasal verbs for more information.

Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thx, you helped me guys a lot.

Hello, I have a course work about phrasal verbs, so can you please help me with some information , with a link or pdf material. It must be reliable, because this course work is like a reseach. Please help mee!

Hello megi22,

To find the materials we have on the site for this topic the best approach will be to use the search facility. Type the item into the search window (click the magnifying glass at the top right of the page) and you will see a list of relevant pages. Useful terms to search for would be multi-word verbphrasal verb, prepositional verb and possibly also particle.

We can't recommend external sites directly but you can find many reliable sites associated with universities and other research areas.

 

Best wishes and good luck,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear sir madam,

could you please advise if the below sentence is correct:

It would be an honor to apply my experience and skills in contributing to organizing.

Kind regards.

Hello studentAsaah,

I'm afraid that is not a correct sentence. The problem is in the last part (after 'skills'), but I can't suggest a correct version as I am not sure what you are trying to say and would not wish to provide an incorrect meaning.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Peter,

Thank you for the reply. What I basically am trying to say is that I would like to apply my skills and experience for a future event that the company wants to organise. Hope it is a bit clearer now.

Kind regards.

Hello studentAsaah,

In that case the sentence could be formulated as follows:

It would be an honor to contribute my experience and skills to the organisation of [the future event]

That is very formal, however - perhaps a little too formal. An alternative would be:

I would be delighted to offer my experience and skills to help with the organisation of [the future event]

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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