Murder Mystery Scene 2

Ashlie thinks she has solved the mystery, but Stephen thinks otherwise. Who is the murderer?

Do the Preparation task first. Next watch the video and do the first Task. Then watch the video again and do the remaining Tasks. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Preparation

Think about the following questions:

  • What kinds of clues would you look for at a crime scene?
  • Who do you think will solve the mystery first?

Watch as Ashlie and Stephen conduct their investigation.

Transcript

Ashlie: Look, Stephen! Another murder. We need to find the killer before he strikes again.

Stephen: Ashlie thinks she’s Sherlock Holmes. She’s taking this murder mystery game very seriously.

Ashlie: Stephen. You’re meant to be my trusty assistant Watson.

Stephen: OK, Sherlock. What have you found?

Ashlie: Well, he seems to be pointing under that sofa.

Stephen: Oh, really?

Ashlie: Let me see.

Stephen: Well, is anything there?

Ashlie: Ah! A clue! A button…

Stephen: And that’s a clue?

Ashlie: Well, Stephen, maybe not for your average detective. But for someone with my powers...

Stephen: Your powers?

Ashlie: Yes. Like Sherlock Holmes once said, ‘Once you have eliminated the impossible, only the possible remains.’ Or something like that.

Ashlie: Come on, Watson. This mystery is almost solved. Bring all the guests into the library. I have an important announcement to make.

Stephen: OK, come on then. Er, not you Pete. You’re dead, remember?

Pete: Oh, right. Sorry!

Stephen: Right. The detective is about to name the murderer.

Ashlie: So, my first clue was the teacup. It was clear that the murderer had poisoned their first victim.

Stephen: Ashlie, I thought we had already decided the first victim was shot.

Ashlie: So you may think. My second clue, though, was the small patch of tea on the victim’s jacket. Now, as Sherlock Holmes once said, once you have removed the impossible, only the possible remains. The murderer would obviously know each and every one of you by heart. 

Ashlie: In conclusion, I was led to the murderer by the clues he had left. And the murderer... is you, sir.

Waiter: Er, sorry?

Ashlie: You, sir. You are the murderer.

Waiter: Actually, I’m not part of this game. I was just bringing some biscuits.

Ashlie: Poisoned biscuits. I knew it.

Waiter: Really, I just work here.

Ashlie: Is this not your button?

Stephen: Ashlie, if you’d been concentrating, the murderer was obvious right from the start.

You found the gun I’d placed near the woman.

You didn’t find the candlestick.

You didn’t find the bottle of poison.

And you didn’t find the knife I had left under the sofa.

So you see, Ashlie, it was me all along.

Ashlie: What, you?

Ashlie: Aha, so you confess your crimes?

Stephen: Yes, Ashlie.

Ashlie: And, of course, that was my plan. I knew you were the murderer. That’s why I blamed the waiter. I wanted you to admit that you were the murderer.

Stephen: Of course you did. Come on, Sherlock. It’s time for a cup of tea.

Language level

Intermediate: B1
The murderer would obviously know each and every one of you by heart:- what would (would)here mean? Could you explain the tense please
Hello fidaasiddig Here, 'would' is used to speak about a hypothetical or imaginary situation. By using 'would', Ashlie shows that she doesn't know the mind of the murderer, but that she is guessing what he or she thinks. All the best Kirk The LearnEnglish Team
From my view a murderer always try not leave anything behind him. Especially they dont leave big stuff behind because it is easy to notice these. So we have to be more careful than murderer. This reason can force to us focus on small stuffs.
I would look clues carefully as possible as and every goods around the murder can be a clue which is related to murderer. So I would examine everything what I see or find such as weapon, footprints and guns.

Hello alaa shaheen,

Both of these are grammatically correct. However, the first sounds very formal and rather old fashioned; the second is the normal way we would express this in modern English.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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