Irregular verbs

Level: beginner

Most verbs have a past tense and past participle with –ed:

worked
played    
listened

But many of the most frequent verbs are irregular:

Base form Past tense Past participle
be was/were been
begin began begun
break broke broken
bring brought brought
buy bought bought
build built built
choose chose chosen
come came come
cost cost cost
cut cut cut
do did done
draw drew drawn
drive drove driven
eat ate eaten
feel felt felt
find found found
get got got
give gave given
go went gone
have had had
hear heard heard
hold held held
keep kept kept
know knew known
leave left left
lead led led
let let let
lie lay lain
lose lost lost
make made made
mean meant meant
meet met met
pay paid paid
put put put
run ran run
say said said
see saw seen
sell sold sold
send sent sent
set set set
sit sat sat
speak spoke spoken
spend spent spent
stand stood stood
take took taken
teach taught taught
tell told told
think thought thought
understand understood understood
wear wore worn
win won won
write wrote written
Irregular verbs

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Hello again Issa,

'advise' is a verb and 'advice' is a noun -- see this dictionary page for a more complete explanation with examples.

Please be sure to check the dictionary when you have questions about words.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, I’d like to know the difference between “awarded something”, “awarded for”, and “awarded with”. Regards, Petals

Hello Petals,

Have you checked the dictionary for example sentences? The Cambridge and Longman dictionaries both have lots of examples that should help you with at least the first two phrases. 'to be awarded with X' means the same thing as 'to be awarded X'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Team I would like to know what "link verbs" are? I also want to know the difference between the usage of the following words: sleep asleep wait await til until when while which that say tell though although despite
Hi Kirk and Peter, This sounds bit obvious but I have small confusion during the conversation, if I don't understand something what other person is saying, which one is the correct way to say "I don't get it" or "I didn't get it?". Regards, Kiran

Hello Kiran,

The proper thing to say depends a bit on how formal the situation is, but here are a few ideas for you. You can say 'Sorry, what was that?' or 'Sorry, I didn't get that.' You could also say 'Could you repeat that, please?' This last one would be better in a more formal situation.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Sir, Please help me with the following sentence. Instruction given : underline the finite verb/s. 'Why do you want to talk to me?' Sir is 'do' and 'want' both finite verbs or only 'do'?. Sir as per my understanding ' to talk' is in finite and only 'do' seems finite. But again I'm confused as want is also a finite verb.

Hello amrita_enakshi,

I think this Wikipedia article (see the examples) will answer your question, but if you have any other questions, please let us know.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello sir, He keeps the table clean. Is the verb "keep" is transitive or intransitive? I'm reading a book that suggesting its a intransitive verb.Can you explain the fact please?

Hello Md.Habibullah,

'keep' is used both transitively and intransitively. You can find detailed definitions and explanations in the dictionary (follow the link). Note that [T] means it is used transitively and [I] means it is used intransitively.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello All, I am a little bit confused about the verb "to get". In your list of irregular verbs (above) you show the only form of verb "to get", that is "get, got and got" that correspond to "base form, past tense and past participle" respectively. I would like to know if the past participle "gotten" is no longer used. Thank you,

Hello edias1504,

'Gotten' is used in some dialects of English, primarily US English. It is not used in British English. As I am from the UK I don't use 'gotten' and I wouldn't like to comment on the particular use in the US of the form (how informal it is, whether it is primarily spoken or also used in written English etc.). I'm sure you can find this information online, however.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

It is a good exercise to improve the different rules of irregular verbs but there isn't every irregular verbs
Hello teacher, are the verbs "pay" and "burn" regular verbs or irregular verbs? Thanks.

Hello Tinnam,

'Pay' is in the list of irregular verbs above.

'Burn' is a regular verb, though it can have an irregular past participle: burn - burned/burnt - burned/burnt.

You can check whether a verb is regular or irregular in any online dictionary, such as this one.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello teacher, this English learning platform is brilliant. I learn everyday and it's been 2 weeks, but, I have a problem. There is no one beside me who can correct my mistakes while speaking and writing in English. Could you please help me? May I post here some of my writings? Thank you

Hello Saakshee,

I'm very glad to hear that you find LearnEnglish useful! You are very welcome to post your writings here, but I'm afraid we don't provide the service of correcting users' writing. Other users might respond to you, though, so please do share them if you'd like to. We can also answer a specific question of yours from time to time.

I'm not sure if this is possible for you or not, but I'm sure that if you took a class at a British Council Centre in India, your teacher could give the kind of feedback you're looking for.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello again Pyramid Foundation,

I'd suggest you take a look at our to + infinitive page. You might also want to use the search box (at the top right of every page) to search for 'infinitive' and find more possibly useful resources.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I have a list of 600 irregular verbs, How many irregular verbs are there in the English language??? ∆∆∆ How many stative verbs are there in the English language which are not used with progressive tenses?? ∆∆∆ Verbs, which have the same three forms, how many verbs are there?? ∆∆∆

Helly Pyramid Foundation,

I'm afraid we don't provide this kind of information. Our purpose is to help our users use our site to improve their English. What you're asking for is far more theoretical. The good news is that you can probably find answers to these questions by typing them in a search engine.

Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello! I just want to ask about the difference between past and pass? The words are quite confusing. Help me please. Thank you very much

Hello RTris,

You can use the dictionary on the right ('Cambridge Dictionaries Online') to look up each word and see all of the definitions each has.

Both words can refer to movement, and I think it is this use which can be confusing.

'Past' is a preposition, while 'pass' is a verb. For example:

I walked past the shop. ['walked' is the verb; 'past' is an adjective]

I passed the shop. ['passed' is the verb]

I hope that clarifies it for you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, I have doubts ,,, 1.can we use prepostitions at the end of sentences, for example, Such an accident has never been heard of(Here I am confused why we have used OF after heard).. 2. Can we use past tense in one clause and present tense in 2nd clause? Eg. I remember the year when she was married. (Or we have to use the same tense in both clauses ) I remembered the year when she was married.

Hello Sonam,

1. Yes, prepositions that go with a verb are often used at the end of a sentence. In the sentence you ask about, 'of' is indeed used with 'hear'. This is very common, especially in the present perfect – see the dictionary entry on this.

2. Yes, you can use different tenses in different clauses. In general, the tense you use should be appropriate for the time you're speaking about. The first version you mention (with present and past) is correct.

I hope that clarifies things for you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello neh7272,

The past participle is also known as the 'third form'. For example, in the sentence 'I have seen the Lotus Temple', the verb is 'have seen' (present perfect); the past participle is 'seen'. Past participles can also be used in other ways.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Sir, I am looking of uses of Moreover, Furthermore and In addition . I have searched on this wesite with the help of the search button but didn't get the appropriate result.

Hello sanjay.singh,

As far as I know, we don't have a page that specifically addresses this topic. In any case, I'd suggest looking them up in the Cambridge Dictionary, where you can find not only definitions, but example sentences. And if you're interested in improving your academic writing, I'd suggest taking a look at our Writing for a Purpose section.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hi friends, these verb are not complete and please give me list full . well I should say that my grammar is extremely bad . i hope settle my trouble . because I will achievement successful in ielts

Hello sh.vo,

This is a list of the most common irregular verbs. I don't know if there is a comprehensive list somewhere on the internet – you can search by doing an internet search for 'English irregular verbs' – but even if there is, your time would probably be better spent learning the most common ones. If you're preparing especially for the IELTS, I'd recommend you check our IELTS section and especially TakeIELTS.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Ether,

No, it is not. I'd suggest you look up 'flight' in the dictionary – see the handy search box on the right side of this page under Cambridge Dictionaries Online. There you'll see that it has several different uses, all as a noun.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello tthaoanh,

You can find this kind of information in the dictionary – see the handy search box on the lower right side of this page. If you look up 'show', you'll see 'showed, shown' listed after it. Those are the past simple and past participle forms – 'shown' is the past participle.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello halima ben,

No, that is not a complete list, but it is a list of the most common irregular verbs. If you learn all of these, that will should be enough for most purposes, but if you want a longer list, I'd suggest doing an internet search for 'irregular verbs English' – I'm sure you can find other, longer lists.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello DDef,

'Gotten' is often used in American English, but not in British English. In British English the past participle of 'get' is 'got' (get - got - got). The British Council is a British institution, and so the language we teach is representative of that.

You can hear about some of the differences between British and American English in this video and on this page and this page.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello. Would it be possible to use the word "fetch" in this way, "She fetch her hospital cards from her purse and gave it to the doctor"

Hello Lamastry,

Yes, you can use it that way, though note that it implies that the woman did not have her purse nearby. Also, 'fetch' should be in the simple past and 'it' is not correct – 'them' is the pronoun you need, since it refers to 'her hospital cards' (plural).

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello I'm unable to explain the difference between these two sentences; 'Scott and Matt are playing soccer tomorrow.' 'Scott and Matt will be playing soccer tomorrow.' When would you use them? The second in future tense, the first, is it Present continuous? Thanks Andrea