Irregular verbs

Level: beginner

Most verbs have a past tense and past participle with –ed:

worked
played    
listened

But many of the most frequent verbs are irregular:

Base form Past tense Past participle
be was/were been
begin began begun
break broke broken
bring brought brought
buy bought bought
build built built
choose chose chosen
come came come
cost cost cost
cut cut cut
do did done
draw drew drawn
drive drove driven
eat ate eaten
feel felt felt
find found found
get got got
give gave given
go went gone
have had had
hear heard heard
hold held held
keep kept kept
know knew known
leave left left
lead led led
let let let
lie lay lain
lose lost lost
make made made
mean meant meant
meet met met
pay paid paid
put put put
run ran run
say said said
see saw seen
sell sold sold
send sent sent
set set set
sit sat sat
speak spoke spoken
spend spent spent
stand stood stood
take took taken
teach taught taught
tell told told
think thought thought
understand understood understood
wear wore worn
win won won
write wrote written
Irregular verbs

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Hello naylera,

Yes, the first is a present continuous form, which is often used to speak about arranged future plans. The second is often called the future continuous – follow the links and you'll find explanations of both forms.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Greetings, I can't find any exact meaning of 'fire" in the Cambridge Dictionary here. 1. Barcelona have forgotten former Arsenal man FIRES them to victory over Malaga. 2. It's fortunate how the ball comes to Wilson via Robert, but he sure makes the most of it by executing a brilliant bycicle kick to FIRE the Cherries ahead. If I interpret it as 'to shoot', it seems that it's not appropriate. So, what does it actually mean?

Hello akatsuki,

The use of 'fire' in these sentences is one of the last ones in the dictionary entry, when it is used as a verb meaning 'excite'. Note that in sentence 2, 'fire' is used with 'ahead' as a kind of multi-word verb: 'to fire ahead'.

I hope this helps you.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hi , Even while the pace of increase in the number of reported rapes in the city has slowed down.In this sentence can you explain the meaning of "EVEN WHILE" clearly.

Hello sabago,

Although we are willing to help with questions which are not related to our own material when time allows, I would ask you to post this question on a related page, such as one on linking devices, rather than this page, which is concerned with irregular verbs. This will help the question and answer to be visible to other users who may be studying the same area.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello I have got really confused whether I have to use singular or plural verb after expressions such as "half of", "a part of", "a percentage of", "a majority of", "percent of" ,etc. I just know that the verb used after these expressions is related to the word following ''of''. Would you please explain it? Thanks in advance for helping me Best wishes Misam

Hello misam,

Whether the noun is singular or plural depends on whether it is a count noun or a non-count noun. You can find more information on our page on quantifiers.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, It's really simple! Third person singular means 'he/she/it', third person plural is 'they'. You can look up first, second and third person in our online dictionary. Best wishes, Adam The LearnEnglish Team
Hello everyone here both educators and learners for your enquiries and responses using irregular verbs which it's useful lessons. Now not yet have questions maybe have next time. please take care, paeng
Hello Mr.Peter M, Thanks for your valuable suggestions and guidance. With regards, Ravikumar
Sir, Please let me Know the differences between the verbs ' Read and Study'. Whether both the verbs mean the same or different. With regards, Ravikumar.

Hello Ravikumar,

You can use the dictionary tool to look up words like this. Just type the words into the search window and click 'Look it up!' to get definitions and examples.

'Read' is what you do with any text: look at the words with your eyes and try to understand them. 'Study' is to actively learn something, which could be information in a text but could also be something else such as mathematics, a language etc. Studying takes some time and is an active process - you have to work at it.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sirs, Please let me know whether the following sentence is alright. 'We haven't performed well in the last two games.' Is it okay to use present perfect tense in this context? With best regards, Ravikumar

Hello Ravikumar,

Yes, that sentence is fine in normal everyday use. Grammatically, as the two games are completed and form a past time, the sentence should use a past simple form. However, normal use is not always consistent with formal grammar rules and you will hear this sentence quite often from the managers and players of football teams, for example.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, educators and all friends here I'm new to learn with everyone thanks alot for your questions, answers and also the learn English team's advice to solve the problem of learners which is really useful for me to improve my English learning skills also due to saw your inquiries and response. Thank you so much plz take care yourself, paeng
In cricket, which one of the following is correct and why? 1.India needs 30 runs to win. or 2. India need 30 runs to win.

Hello Daelou RK,

Both of these are fine. We can talk about 'India' as a team, in which case we use the singular form 'needs', or as a group of players, in which case we use the plural form 'need'. Many group words function in this way: Manchester United, India, the police, the government and so on.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello singh singh,

On the top right side of this page, in the box called 'English Grammar', you'll see a list of links to pages on the subject of Verbs. The present tense, past tense, talking about the present, talking about the future, talking about the past pages will all be useful for you.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello FarrousGh,

In American English, yes, it's usually 'gotten', but in other varieties, such as British English, 'got' is more common. You can find this sort of information in a good dictionary - see the search box on the lower right side of this page, for example.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, 1.While talking of or describing actions of third person,we always use verbs with 's'. 2.Second one is,do and does for different person. Why these distinctions in english ?.Are any fundamental or core reasons for this ? Thanks,and regards Nandish

Hello Nandish,

Sometimes language authorities make rules about the way a language is used, but for the most part, natural languages develop through use by their speakers, and that is the case with the forms you ask about. There may be forms that were used in the past that might help 'explain' the forms you ask about, but I'm afraid we don't go into such issues here at LearnEnglish.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi!In the sentences : You must leave your bag here or You must drop your bag here,is there any difference in meaning?

Hello llariuccia,

In most contexts, no, there is no real difference in meaning. Please note that you can find definitions of words and examples of them in use by using our Cambridge Dictionaries Online searchbox on the lower right side of the screen.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

i think i'm good in this, my problem is when i talk i forget that i need time to remember what do you advice me , help plz and thnx :))

Hello mim_all,

Speaking can be challenging because we don't always have time to reflect and consider what to say. However, there are some things you can do to improve. Take a look at the advice on our Help page and I'm sure this will help you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello ogoezeaku,

I'm afraid there's no way to immediately tell whether a verb which we see in the infinitive or present form will have a regular or irregular past form. It's simply something you have to learn.

One thing that can help is that the irregular verbs are often the most common verbs (be, do, give, go etc) as these are verbs which children learn very early before they have assimilated the rules of grammar.

There are also some patterns which you can spot:

drink - drank - drunk / swim - swam - swum

speak - spoke - spoken / wear - wore - worn / break - broke - broken

However, these are not rules and do not apply to all verbs.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

i need to get clarification about tense form, when to use past continuous tense? when to use past perfect continuous tense? pls help me.

Hello Jayaprakash1020,

You can find the answers to these questions on our grammar pages. For our main grammar section go to this page and use the links on the right (click on 'Verbs'). For our Quick Grammar links go to this page and look through the topics.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello sir What´s the correct use of the verb "get" and its participle? Because I´ve learned that its participle is "gotten", and I don´t know if I use "got" instead of "gotten" would be correct A. I have gotten a good education at this school. B. I have got a good education at this school. So, which one would be correct?

Hello The Silence,

'gotten' is more typical in some varieties of English such as American English, whereas 'got' is more common in British English and other varieties. Both forms are correct in the sentence you ask about.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi there, Help me with the verb "track" in "track sb/sth down" For example, for the rest of his life he lived in fear of having tracked down why cant I use .. in fear of being tracked down thanks

Hi Joong Myn,

You can - should - say 'being tracked down'. In this sentence 'being' is the correct form; 'having' is incorrect. After a preposition such as 'of' we need a noun or a gerund, and the gerund here is 'being' as the verb form is a passive (to be tracked down).

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks, I see Besides I looked this word up and found that the verb track in this situation is used as a transitive verb, as a result it should be used as a passive form. I wonder whether this explanation is right?

Hello Joong Myn,

Yes, transitive verbs like 'track' can be used in the passive. Whether you use a verb in the passive or not really depends on what you want to communicate, but certainly it is possible in this case.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello sir for the verb lie the past participle you wrote is lain but i checked here http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lie they write lying so how come that !!!!!!

Hello Haytham Hawamdeh,

We do not comment on what information other sites may provide. I can make two points, however.

First, 'lying' is not a past participle of any verb. It is a present participle or an -ing form.

Second, there are two verbs with the base form (infinitive) 'lie', only one of which is irregular:

1. lie as in deliberately say something untrue. The forms for this are lie - lied - lied, so it is a regular and not irregular verb, using ';-ed' (in this case '-d' as the base form already ends in an 'e') to form the past and past participle forms.

2. lie as in lie down on a bedThe forms for this verb are lie - lay - lain, as in the explanation above. This is an irregular verb

Both verbs are intransitive, meaning they have no object.

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello xoxopooja,

'I was going' is an example of a past continuous form whereas 'I had been gone' is an example of a past perfect form (although it looks like a passive form, 'go' is an intransitive verb and has no passive forms; therefore here, 'gone' is functioning as an adjective). You can find more information on each of these forms by clicking the links above.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hi xoxopooja i am a little bit out of practice but i think that i coud perhaps help u a little bit with your dout. you have to look for the concept of each tense, i mean, the secuence of time they are refering to. i don't know in this site because i am new here, but there are graphics that ilustrate the begining and end of the action for each verb tense taking as reference the person who is speaking or stating the phrase