You are here

Episode 06: Welcome back Johnny!

Johnny is back! But is he back for good? And Carlos is going to tell us something really important...

Image

Do the Preparation task first. Then listen to the audio. Next go to each Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Télécharger

Language level

Intermediate: B1
Pre-intermediate: A2

Comments

Hello jessica_22,

There is no easy way to know which form should be used – it depends on the verb, e.g. in this case the verb 'stop'. Some verbs take a to infinitive, others take the -ing form and some, like 'stop' can take both forms.

You should look up such verbs, e.g. 'stop' in the dictionary – see the handy search box on the right side of this page – and it will show you how they are used and what they mean. In your first sentence, it means you no longer have the habit of smoking. In the second one, it means you stopped doing something so that you could have a smoke!

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello there
Someone help me join these tow sentences but use THAT?
There are workers. They from England.

Hello Shamal,

You can use 'that' as a relative pronoun to join these two sentences. See our relative clauses page for an explanation of how to do it.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Shamal,

Yes, you can use 'that' to join the sentences. Please read through the page I linked to and then try to join the two sentences into one using 'that'. If you write that sentence here in the comments, we'll tell you if it's correct or not and help you understand it.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, LearnEnglish Team!
I have a question. When Johnny says:" Well, you’ll fit in with our team, then!", it's an irony, isn't it? Does he mean that nobody play football good in their team?

Hello krig,

That's exactly right – well done! 

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello
what's the meaning of : we got a campaign going
what's the difference with " we did a campaign"

Hello baabor275,

'to get something going' means to start something, so in this case it means to start a campaign – 'campaign' has several meanings and you can find definitions and examples of them in the Cambridge dictionary search box on the lower right side of this page.

There are other verbs, such as 'run', that are usually used with 'campaign'; it's possible to use 'do', but it's unusual. The examples in the entry for 'campaign' will give you some ideas on how the word is typically used.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello teacher,
This project will only partially co-fund a household survey by aligning and piggy-bagging on activities.
I couldn't find the meaning of "piggy-bagging" in the Cambridge Dictionaries Online. Could you please advise me on this?Thank you so much in advance.

Hello myuyen,

'piggy bag' doesn't make any sense to me, either, so I think this might be an error. 'piggy bank' and 'piggyback' are words that are similar in form and which you can find in the dictionary. I think what the writer means here is probably 'piggy back', transforming it into a verb. 

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Pages