London 2: A Penny for the Yard

What was it like to watch one of Shakespeare's plays in the 1600s? Join Ben Crystal on his visit to Shakespeare's Globe, a reproduction of the original Globe Theatre in London.

Transcript

In Shakespeare's time this area of London was not only home to actors and theatre-goers. Southwark was a rough, dangerous and fairly lawless part of the city.

It's now home to a more modern and rich London. But something of Shakespeare has been kept alive. Just down the road from the original foundations there is a recreation of Shakespeare's Globe, built in the mid 1990s.

Ben: How similar is it to the one that was here 400 years ago?

Dr Farah Karim-Cooper: Well, in terms of the architectural features they were very similar, like the shape of the theatre, the fact that the stage thrusts out into the yard, the fact that there is a stage roof which they used to call the heavens. It has an upper stage balcony, musicians' gallery, the three doors where actors come in and exit, the trapdoor in the stage as well as the trapdoor in the roof, all of those things were features that were in Shakespeare's original theatre in 1599.

The materials of the building would have inspired his work. Sometimes there's references in his plays to thatch and to the wooden dialogue of the actors' shoes on the stage. Those types of technologies, those special effects in the theatres, would have inspired scenes where gods are being lowered from the heavens. Those types of things were written into Shakespeare's plays.

Ben: What were the audience in Shakespeare's time like that came to see his plays here?

Farah: The audiences were wide-ranging. They came from all social classes. Because it only cost a penny to come into the yard and stand you would have had the working classes, you know, the butchers and the tailors, but also the higher up you go in the galleries the higher the class, and if you pay six pence, which is the most amount you could pay, you would sit in these beautifully painted gentlemen’s rooms very comfortably.

We have a wide range of audiences from all over the world now, because Shakespeare has such an extraordinary global appeal.  It's the magic of his storytelling.

Shakespeare wrote 38 plays and over 150 poems, which are still enjoyed today.

And whilst we can get an understanding of what Shakespeare's life must have been like in London and how much the city inspired him, I believe his works only truly come alive when they are held in the heart, spoken out loud, wherever you are in the world.

Discussion

Language level

Upper intermediate: B2

Soumis par Evgeny N le lun 21/10/2019 - 13:59

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Dear sirs! There is a mistake in the transcript. In transcript in the 5th paragraph it is written: The materials of the building would have inspired his work. Sometimes there’s references in his plays to thatch and to the wooden dialogue of the actors’ shoes on the stage. You also find the trapdoors, those types of technologies, those special effects in the theatres, would have inspired scenes where gods are being lowered from the heavens. In the video Dr Farah Karim-Cooper doesn't say words: You also find the trapdoors. The transcript has to be next: The materials of the building would have inspired his work. Sometimes there’s references in his plays to thatch and to the wooden dialogue of the actors’ shoes on the stage. Those types of technologies, those special effects in the theatres, would have inspired scenes where gods are being lowered from the heavens.

Soumis par Néstor Serrano le jeu 12/07/2018 - 18:40

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Like the speaker says: In this place of London, there was a rich and poor people, then this is a clue about the price, a penny, but, how much it was a penny for this century? I am refering about the life cost of the England citizens at this historical time. By the other side, there's not many safe places in this country and the theatre offered to the people a safest place than others because the number of viewers that surely was in this site.

Soumis par amitshahc le lun 18/09/2017 - 10:12

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Hello, My name is Amit. after trying hard in IELTS I got R:9.0, L:6.5, W:7.0, S:6.0 when i was trying to score at least 7.0 in each. What I learnt and I am focusing now is; rather than just practicing and improving over IELTS, I am really interested to improve my overall English skill to the next level, i.e. from Intermediate to Advanced. But somehow I felt that, these materials here are still not for advance level that i am looking for. However, it's still helpful for my regular english corrections and learning in speaking where i am a bit weak. I want you to guide me to find the next level (Advance) english lessons with less common words and routing idioms used.

Hello Amit,

The first thing I would recommend is an IELTS course, as I'm afraid we don't provide individualised tuition here. We do have, however, some general advice on preparing for the IELTS in our IELTS section as well as general advice on improving your speaking on our Frequently asked questions page -- perhaps some of it could be helpful.

I'd also highly recommend TakeIELTS, our Facebook page and the British Council IELTS YouTube channel. Finally, there is also a British Council Understanding IELTS online course at Future Learn.

I'm sure one or more of these resources can help you. Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Soumis par Daniel Tranv le sam 15/07/2017 - 05:13

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No, I rarely go to the theatre. Comparing between film and television, I would prefer film because of some reasons: It is homier, I can switch it off channels when I feel uninterested and I can share opinions and discuss with friends while watching.

Soumis par Yelin le lun 12/06/2017 - 03:12

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I enjoy a lot going to a theatre. If it is compared to film or television, the theatre is alive whilst the others are plastic. To be in a theatre is a great experience, it is possible to feel the artist's nervous and their ability to be someone else. Additionally, to share the same time gives the possibility to share a mistake and laugh together, that would never happened watching tv or at the cinema.

Soumis par Samar Ahmed le mer 15/03/2017 - 14:10

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Please, i don't understand the meaning of verb " thrust out "

Hello Samar Ahmed,

In general, 'thrust' means to 'push'. In this case, the verb is metaphorical and describes the position of the stage. The idea is that the stage takes up space in the yard, where the audience watches the play -- if you look at this photo, you can see how the stage 'thrusts out' into the yard. In some theatres, in contrast, the stage is inside the wall -- see the photo on the Theater Wikipedia page.

I hope that helps you make sense of it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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