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Episode 03

In this episode Tess and Ravi talk about clothes, and their guests talk about the designer of Apple products, Jonathan Ive, and women's football. You can also follow Carolina on her journey from Venezuela to the UK. Will she find her suitcase?

Elementary Podcasts: Tess & Ravi

Listen to the podcast then do the first exercise to check your understanding. If you have more time choose some of the language practice exercises.

Check your understanding

Exercise

Language practice exercises

Task 1

Tess and Ravi 

Practise the language you heard in Tess and Ravi's introduction [00:20] .

Exercise

Task 2

Carolina 1

Practise the language you heard in the soap opera about Carolina [15:45].

Exercise

Task 3

Carolina 2

Practise the language you heard in the soap opera about Carolina [15:45].

Exercise

Task 4

Carolina 3

Practise the language you heard in the soap opera about Carolina [15:45].

Exercise

Task 5

Tom the teacher 1

Practise the language you heard in Tom the teacher’s summary [21:24].

Exercise

Task 6

Tom the teacher 2

Practise the language you heard in Tom the teacher’s summary [21:24].

Exercise

Task 7

Tom the teacher 3

Practise the language you heard in Tom the teacher’s summary [21:24].

Exercise

Task 8

Tom the teacher 4

Practise the language you heard in Tom the teacher’s summary [21:24].

Exercise

Discussion

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1
Pre-intermediate: A2

Comments

Hello Eddi,

The language in this section is very informal and is a good example of the kind of stream of consciousness that we speak like this. If you look at the tense use you will see that it is a mixture: the actions are expressed with past forms ('looked', 'thought' etc) but the opinions/ideas of the speaker are expressed with present or future forms ('will', 'can't') to make them seem more current and immediate.

It is a good example of how tense use can be flexible in English.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you dear Peter. thank you for your swift answer. you and Kirk are very professional.
One more question - So would not it be advisible to use such language in writing ?

Hello Eddi,

In general, when we write we are more concerned with accuracy than when we speak as we leave a record behind on the basis of which we may be judged. Speaking is much more chaotic and unplanned. However, not all writing is the same and not all speaking is the same. A formal speech should be accurate and use standard grammar, while a quick chat with a friend may be much more relaxed in terms of accuracy. An article intended for publication and a note stuck to the fridge will have very different forms in this regard. It is the context and relationship between the speaker and listener (writer and reader) which is key.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello!
On I’d to meet Section Martin said: “… even the Queen’s got an iPod.”
So, is the expression “Queens’s” a short form of “Queen is” there? If it is, could you tell me the meaning please? It sounds strange to me.

Hello filipeanttonio,

The phrase the Queen's got here means the Queeen has got.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello The LearnEnglish Team. Please, answer my question posted earlier about the verb look. I'm really interested in it. Thanks.

Hello morkofkalove,

I have answered the question. Sometimes it takes us a few days to answer a question - we are a small team here and there are many questions every day!

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello The LearnEnglish Team,
There's a typo in the word 'don't' in this sentence: 'You don;t need to change' (Practice materials - Exercise 3; the last section)
With appreciation,
Dima

Hello Dima,

Thank you for spotting this. I have edited the exercise to correct the mistake.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

What can I say about women's football? The answer is ‘nothing’. I’m not a football fan and watch it quite rarely but I’ve never heard my friends, who are passionate about this sport, talk about women’s football league or anything related to it neither. I think it’s less popular than men’s football because there is lesser amount of people who like watching tough and competitive women. Women weren’t allowed to do many things in the past. They were blamed for doing men’s activities and I guess this attitude hasn’t completely disappeared nowadays. Football isn’t popularized among female pupils or students in many countries and mine is no exception. I dare to assume that football could be compared to the process of human nature where “scoring a goal” by a woman is impossible and simply unnatural. That’s probably why the men’s game is subconsciously perceived as more natural and interesting and so more popular.

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