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Episode 01

LearnEnglish Podcasts is back! Join Adam, Tess, Ravi and a new presenter for Series 4 as they talk about pets and whether it's true that the British are crazy about animals. Please join us, and let us know what you think!

Tess & Ravi

Task 1

Task 2

Task 3

Task 4

Task 5

Task 6

Task 7

Task 8

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

  • How do you feel about animals? If you’ve been to Britain, do you think what Tess and Ravi said is true – are the British pet lovers?
  • How do people view animals where you live? How common is it for people to have pets in your country? Do you have one? What kind?

Leave a comment and we'll discuss some of your answers in the next podcast.

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1
Pre-intermediate: A2

Comments

In my village people used to keep dogs to help them breeding sheeps and goats, so the dogs are helpful for us.

First of all thank you for your help
getting the meaning of the sentence.

This is a statement made by a character
In a movie while he is falling off the building and
Another character in time catch him
The character about to fall says below statement:
"Kinda cutting it close there."

Hello Darshann,

To 'cut it close' means something like 'wait almost too long'. So it sounds like the falling person is complaining that the other one almost didn't catch them.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

awesome

I´m from Colombia and people here love pets. When I was a kid, I used to sleep with my cats and fought with my siblings for having them in my bed.

I am from Bangladesh. Its a small beautiful country in the WORLD so, I am very proud of to born in this land.

I am Darshan Parmar, one your podcast listeners.
I don't get the meaning of the below word:
1. "I missed the part where that's my problem."
2. "Kinda cutting it closer"

Will you help me to get the idea of it exactly.

Hello Darshan,

Are these from this episode? I can't find them. 1 sounds like a way of saying you refuse to accept responsibility for something and 2 is difficult to interpret without context; 'kinda' is a way of representing the way 'kind of' is pronounced in informal speaking.

I hope this helps.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I'm happy because you decided to continue the podcasts series.
I liked all the series but in my opinion the first series was the best.
I miss the jokes of the first series and in the same time I miss the quiz.
I think the jokes are a good way to learn english as any other language.
Best wishes for british council and for the people who work for it.

Great, you are back! I missed a lot the podcasts. You are really welcome!

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