Camden Scene 2 - Language Focus

Rob talks about the sort of questions people ask when they go clothes shopping.

Watch the video. Then go to Task and do the activities.

Task 1

Language Task

Match the beginnings and endings.

Exercise

Task 2

Language Task

Are the sentences from a clothes shop or from a restaurant?

Exercise

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Submitted by May Thida Su on Sat, 06/03/2021 - 11:17

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Could any of you tell me what Ash and Rob said at 0:08 to 0:12? I'll appreciate you all.

Hi May Thida Su,

Ashlie says: It took him ages to find a present for Mum.

Rob says: Yeah, it looked, er, sort of interesting. 

I hope that helps :)

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by musashow17 on Sat, 19/01/2019 - 00:25

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Dear Sir First off all i want to emphasize that this site is extremlly usefull and helpfull for learner english. Thank you for everything. Could you give me more detail about websites for IELTS to study. I examined this section ''https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/IELTS'' but from my view it is not enough and there are not enough exercises. Could you help me how can ı get high score(min6.5) in IELTS exam. Yours faitfully musashow17

Submitted by Peter M. on Sat, 19/01/2019 - 08:44

In reply to by musashow17

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Hello musashow17,

The first place to go is our site for IELTS candidates. You'll find a lot of information about the exam, preparation materials, practice exams with sample answers and more. You can find it here:

http://takeielts.britishcouncil.org

 

You can also take a free online IELTS preparation course:

https://www.britishcouncil.org.tr/en/english/mooc/understanding-ielts-techniques

 

I hope those links are helpful.

 

Good luck!

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by ames5 on Thu, 18/10/2018 - 10:48

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"Shopping with Stephen is a night man" ? I could not recognize what she said an what does she mean in this sentence

Hello ames5,

Ashlie says 'Shopping with Stephen is a nightmare'. In other words, it is like a bad dream!

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by LeonidM on Fri, 12/01/2018 - 18:21

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Hiya! Exuse me, can you help about first frase of Rob, I do not understand it. Rob speak "Nice ***, Ashle". I can not understand, nice what?

Hi LeonidM,

Rob says "Nice outfit, Ashlie", which is a compliment about how Ashlie is dressed.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Joan Portillo on Fri, 15/09/2017 - 12:10

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Hi. Actually I have two questions. First, the greeting hiya is it informal? And the second, the phrase "have got" is it in past participle tense or is it in present tense? Thank you.

Hi Joan Portillo,

Yes, 'hiya' is very informal and is rarely written.

'Have got' looks like a present perfect form but it is treated as a verb in its own right. The form originally comes from the verb 'get' (with the sense of 'receive') but it is best thought of as a distinct verb meaning 'have' or 'possess'. For example, if I say 'I haven't got any money' it really means 'I don't have any money', not that 'I haven't received any money'. Indeed, I many have had money and spent it or lost it. Therefore we treat 'have got' as a separate verb and as a present simple form.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by labeb Najip Abdullah on Tue, 20/06/2017 - 16:05

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That lesson is important. It is useful for me.

Submitted by Will Smile Li on Thu, 11/05/2017 - 06:33

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Hello, I am confused with "try on" too, in what situation that "try" and "on" can be separated? Are these expressions correct: "Can I try on it ?" "Can I try the blue one on?"

Submitted by Kirk on Thu, 11/05/2017 - 11:08

In reply to by Will Smile Li

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Hello Will Smile Li,

'try on' is a separable phrasal verb. The objects of separable phrasal verbs can go between the verb and the particle, or after the particle -- e.g. both 'try the blue one on' and 'try on the blue one' are correct.

When the object is a pronoun, however, the pronoun can only go between the verb and the particle. In other words, 'try it on' is correct but *'try on it' is not. This rule is true of any separable phrasal verb.

This is explained in more detail on the page I linked to above.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Charles Ma on Mon, 08/05/2017 - 01:10

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hi, I can't listening parts of this video very well, and i haven't found the "Transcript" in the page. Could you add this function in, please? Think you very much!

Submitted by Kirk on Mon, 08/05/2017 - 15:11

In reply to by Charles Ma

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Hello Charles Ma,

We plan to add transcripts one day, but I'm afraid it's going to be some time before they are ready. In the meantime, if you have a question about a short segment or two, please feel free to ask us. We only request that you tell us what the time code is (e.g. 1:11–1:16).

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Marcela Santos on Sun, 02/04/2017 - 22:38

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Hi I need some help. I don't understand the meaning or the function of the word "on" in this phrases: Can I try on the blue ones please? Can I try it on please? We just can say "Can I try the blue ones please?" It's about a grammar form?

Submitted by Peter M. on Mon, 03/04/2017 - 07:05

In reply to by Marcela Santos

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Hello Marcela Santos,

'Try on' is an example of a multi-word verb, also called a phrasal verb, where the verb occurs with a particle (a preposition or adverb) to create a new meaning.

'Try' has a very general meaning. 'Try on' has a more specific meaning and is used only in connection with clothes.

You can read more about these verbs here and here.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by nando0167 on Fri, 05/05/2017 - 03:35

In reply to by Marcela Santos

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Hi Marcela, "Try on" it's a phrasal verb, is the way that how people naturally speak on the street, I don't see any problem in use just "Try", I've said it when I was in London and I had no problem but, if you wanna talk more naturally you should use the phrasal verbs. It's like the another phrasal verb "Put On" (let me put on my jacket), it's quite similar if you think about the word "on". All the best Fernando

Submitted by xsjra on Sat, 01/04/2017 - 06:10

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is it true to say: do you have them in blue? instead of : have you got them in blue?

Hello xsjra,

Yes, both of those are perfectly fine and have the same meaning.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Bassantmoustaf2017 on Mon, 27/03/2017 - 12:28

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Hi I couldn't put all these sentence in the box you have to fix it I can only put one in each

Hello Bassantmoustaf2017,

In Task 1, only one sentence can go in each box. In Task 2, after you have one sentence in a box, you must add the second (or third, etc.) sentence by

  1. clicking or pressing on the sentence you want to move
  2. when you try to add it to the box, you must click or press on the small hand that is on the right side of the sentence that is already in the box

My explanation makes it sound difficult, but actually it's quite easy. Please let me know if you can't get it to work.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by siba azeez on Tue, 14/02/2017 - 19:20

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I can't answer task two because each one has more than one answer but it didn't accept but one

Hello siba azeez,

To add items to each list you need to click on the box, not on one of the items already added because this will swap them. The best way is to click on the title of the box (which turns to dark grey after your first click). That way you will be able to add multiple items.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by siba azeez on Tue, 14/02/2017 - 19:07

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What did Rob say in the time 00:00:10

Hello siba azeeez,

Rob says:

Yeah, it looked sort of interesting

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by udaka on Sat, 28/01/2017 - 06:04

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Peter, Thank you very much. Udaka

Submitted by Ninochka on Fri, 27/01/2017 - 20:25

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Hi! Can you help me? I can't correctly understand what Ashlie says (0:20-0:27)? Thank you =)

Hi Ninochka,

What Ashlie says is:

Yeah, that reminds me of the time Stephen went to Spain. He had to eat fast food every day because he couldn't order anything in Spanish.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by udaka on Thu, 26/01/2017 - 15:05

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HI! Could you please explain the following sentences/questions. How did you get on? Lunch is on me We've got to get a move on. Unless you prefer the green ones? Thanks

Submitted by Peter M. on Fri, 27/01/2017 - 10:05

In reply to by udaka

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Hello udaka,

It's difficult to explain some of these without knowing what part is confusing. However, I'll help with those that I can.

How did you get on?

This means 'Did things go well?' or 'Were you successful?' An appropriate answer might be 'It was fine, thanks.'

Lunch is on me

This means that the speaker will pay for lunch.

We've got to get a move on.

This means there is little time and it is necessary to hurry.

Unless you prefer the green ones?

I'm afraid I don't know what part of this is confusing.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nizam Balinese on Wed, 11/01/2017 - 05:52

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Hi Team, Could you please help me with these confusion. Ashlie : Shopping with Stephen is nightmare. It took him ages to find a present for Mum. ================ Sorry Team, I get a little bit distracted with Ashlie's conclusion. How can she said " it took him ages to find a present for Mum". In fact, I watched that Stephen was faster than Ashlie in finding a present for their Mum. or my understanding is wrong? Thanks.

Hello Nizam,

This is meant to be funny, showing Ashlie's perspective, which isn't very accurate! You've understood it well.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team