Farming Scene 1 - Language Focus

Rob explains how to use ‘should’, ‘should have’ and some expressions used in giving directions.

Watch the video. Then go to Task and do the activities.

Take your language skills and your career to the next level
Get unlimited access to our self-study courses for only £5.99/month.

Language level

Submitted by May Thida Su on Sat, 17/04/2021 - 15:07

Permalink
I want to know Can I use " should've taken my umbrella " instead for " should've brought my umbrella " ?

Hello May Thida Su,

We use 'bring' to speak about moving something to the place we or the person we are speaking to are located. So if you are talking about the moment of speaking -- for example, it's started to rain and you don't have an umbrella -- then 'I should've brought my umbrella' is correct (and 'taken' is not).

We use 'take' to speak about moving something to a place that is different from where we or the person we are speaking to are located. So if you are talking about a past situation -- for example, yesterday when you went to the market and it rained but you had no umbrella -- then the 'taken' form would be the correct one.

You might find this explanation of 'bring' and 'take' useful.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Bara on Thu, 26/03/2020 - 11:05

Permalink
Hi Team, please Help me..... I don´t understand the difference between : For example: You should have taken an umbrella. - You should take an umbrella.

Hello Bara

The difference between 'should' and 'should have' is explained on our Modals with 'have' page. Here, 'you should take' is referring to the present or future (for example, imagine that you know it is raining and you see that I'm leaving the house -- this would be a time to say 'you should take') and 'you should have taken' refers to the past (for example, if I come home wet from the rain, you could tell me 'you should have taken').

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Stephane on Wed, 06/02/2019 - 17:25

Permalink
Hi the team, What did Steven say at the end of the video ? Best regards, Stéphane

Hello Stephane

He says 'It's matasak, in Persian.' and then 'I'll see you later, Rob.'

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by M.A.KH on Sat, 27/10/2018 - 07:57

Permalink
Why we say " Pietro didn't pass his exam. he shuld have studied harder " and we don't say " he should has studied harder " . thanks

Hello M.A.KH,

Should have is an example of a perfect modal verb and these verbs do not change their form. We use 'have' in all such examples:

should have

would have

won't have

could have

etc.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by lellablu on Sun, 07/10/2018 - 19:08

Permalink
Scarecrow is spaventapasseri in italian, a very long word!

Submitted by özgür altun on Tue, 18/09/2018 - 21:15

Permalink
scarecrow means korkuluk in Turkish

Submitted by Rama Santoso on Fri, 28/04/2017 - 09:41

Permalink
I think we use "go along" if the thing is long, and "go across" if it is not long. is my perception right?

Submitted by AlanisyGerard1023 on Sun, 16/04/2017 - 11:49

Permalink
I am no sure about it: You should have come with us or You should have came with us. Someone can explain it please. thank you.

Hello AlanisyGerard1023,

'should have come' is the correct form. This is the modal verb 'should' followed be a perfect infinitive, which is formed from 'have' + the past participle (third form). 'came' is the past simple, not the past participle.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Vitru on Sat, 08/04/2017 - 10:17

Permalink
Hello, guys good morning! Watching the video I found something really interesting. I discovered that " Should have " is always followed by " Past Participle ", furthermore " Past Participle " is used even with " Could have " and " Would have ". - Should have - Could have + Past Participle - Would have

Submitted by shams on Mon, 13/03/2017 - 18:23

Permalink
Hi 1- when i use go cross and go along ? i did't understand 2- what's the name the like person to scared a bird in farm ?

Submitted by Kirk on Tue, 14/03/2017 - 06:48

In reply to by shams

Permalink

Hello shams,

In 'go along', 'along' means that you follow a more-or-less straight line. For example, you can go along a street, go along the riverside, go along a path, etc.

In 'go across', 'across' means that you go from one side of something to the other side. So, for example, you can go across an area (such as a field) or go across a line (such as a street or bridge).

I'm afraid I don't completely understand your second question, so if I don't answer it, please ask us again in other words. The thing that scares Ashlie is a scarecrow.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team