Multicultural Britain

Notting Hill Carnival grew out of Caribbean traditions. Today, it is an event where all cultures come together. As Nick’s been finding out, the UK truly is multicultural.

Instructions

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Preparation

Before you watch

Think about the following questions:

  • Have you ever visited or lived somewhere with a different culture?
  • How multicultural is the place where you live?
  • Is there more immigration to or emigration from your country?

Now, watch the video to find out more about multicultural Britain.

Transcript

Transcript

This is Southall Broadway in West London. This area has one of the largest Asian populations in London. The United Kingdom is an ethnically diverse country with many different communities that reflects the multicultural nature of Britain. Many British people’s families originally come from overseas. Over the centuries, people from around the world have come to live here.

The first significant wave of immigrants arrived by ship from Jamaica in 1948. The Notting Hill Carnival celebrates this Caribbean culture. 

In the 1950s and 60s, Indian, Bangladeshi and Pakistani families made Britain their home. Asian Ugandan refugees fled here in the 1970s. Followed by Somalis in the 90s. And in recent years, Eastern European citizens have arrived in search of work.

This cultural variety makes Britain a vibrant place to be, but it’s not without its problems. Conflicts can arise between cultures and generations. Young people whose parents or grandparents settled here have a very different experience of growing up to their parents.

.....

Sunny Grewel and his father Avinda live in Southall. Avinda came here from Kenya in the 70’s. Sunny was born here.

Nick: Avinda, what was life like when you first came here?

Avinda: It was hard. There was no jobs for, for people like us.

Nick: And what’s life like now, for young people, Sunny?

Avinda: I think we’re very much a part of the communities and government and everything, so it’s a lot more equal for everyone.

Nick: What are the main arguments between the younger and older generations?

Avinda: When they were small, I wouldn’t let him wear these earrings and have a long ponytail. They have to look smart.

Nick: And what’s the best thing about living here, Sunny?

Sunny: The food, the different cultures that come in and bring their spices, their experiences and even their rituals, so you get a taste of the world within this small community.

.....

In the past, differences between communities have led to violence. But new community-based projects have brought different generations and cultures together.

Here at St Mary’s School in Cardiff in Wales, more than 20 languages are spoken. It’s one of the most multicultural schools in Wales. The school was involved with a project called 'Open Cities'. It helps migrants, people from other countries, become part of the community. The school children took pictures of people and places to show what it's like to live in Cardiff.

Some of the kids are featured in an exhibition called Open Cities Faces.

.....

Mercy and Joy and their father Derek are originally from Zambia. They have lived here for six years. 

Nick: Derek, tell me why you came to Cardiff and why you took part in this project.

Derek: I am an Engineering Consultant. I came to Cardiff because I was offered a job here. This project was a good thing because it was trying to show something positive about migration and integration.

Nick: Why is Mercy photographed by a window?

Derek: Because the photographer wanted to find a way to show the hopes for our future – the better life that we look towards.

Nick: But there’s a lot of shadow in that photograph, as well.

Derek: Yes, the shadow is deliberate to try to show our past, where we’ve come from.

Nick: And do you consider Cardiff to be your home now?

Derek: Yes. We are part of the local community, we have settled down and we think Cardiff is great.

Projects like ‘Open Cities’ can bring people in the community together and give young people hope for the future. 

Task 1

Vocabulary Task

Match the words in the box with the descriptions underneath.

Exercise

Task 2

Vocabulary Task

Read the questions and select the correct answers.

Exercise

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Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Sun, 28/03/2021 - 22:54

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Hello Team. Could you please explain if there is any difference between "light" and "lighting"? Also, In the following sentence, Are they interchangeable? - The (light - lighting) in the hall was enough for me to read my newspaper. Thank you.

Hi Ahmed Imam,

Lighting usually refers to non-natural lighting (i.e., light produced by equipment, such as lamps on a film set or in a room), while light can be natural or non-natural light.

So, in this sentence, both words work fine, but if it refers to sunlight in the hall, I would use light. If it refers to electric light, either word is OK.

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Thu, 11/02/2021 - 09:45

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Hello. Could you please help me? Which word is correct in the following sentence? Why? - Accountants help people with their (finances - finance). I think both of them are correct here, right? Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

I'd say 'finances' here, and not 'finance'. 'finances' usually refers to money, but it can also refer to the way someone manages money. 'finance' usually refers to the management of money more than the money itself. In one dictionary entry I saw that 'finance' can also refer to money, but this usage sounds a little odd to me.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Sun, 31/01/2021 - 06:21

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Hi, team. I'm confused about the difference between "gap" and "hole". For example: - We can see the sky through a (gap - hole) in the roof. What is the correct word in such a context? Thank you all in advance

Hello Ahmed Imam,

In general, a gap is a space between two larger objects -- think of, for example, the space between a train and the platform. That space runs the whole length of the train and is the separation between the two objects.

A hole is usually the space inside a single object. A window, for example, is essentially a hole in a wall.

In the case of your sentence, 'hole' is probably the best choice.

Hope this helps.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Fri, 04/12/2020 - 07:20

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Hello. Could you please help me? What's wrong with the following sentence? Why? - Before trying on shoes, you should always wear socks. Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

I think you need to use the verb 'put on' rather than 'wear'.

When you have a time reference like 'before' you need to refer to a particular action which you could take. You could use 'wear' if the sentence referred to a general state rather than an action:

Before trying on shoes, you should always put socks on.

When trying on shoes, you should always be wearing socks.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Fri, 17/01/2020 - 16:40

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Hello. Could you please help me? Which adjective is correct in the following sentence? How can I use them correctly? - The Clarence Hotel in Exeter is a (historic - historical) one in England. Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam

There is an explanation of the difference between 'historic' and 'historical' on this Cambridge Dictionary page. Unless I've misunderstood what you mean, 'historic' would be the correct choice here.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team