Snowdon Scene 1

Stephen and Ashlie arrive at the hotel in Snowdonia, but they don't have the same idea about how to relax!

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the transcript at any time.

Preparation

Before you watch

Think about the following questions:

  • What kind of outdoor activities and sports do you like doing?
  • What kind of sports do you think Ashlie and Stephen enjoy?

Now watch Stephen and Ashlie during their trip to North Wales.

Transcript

Transcript

Stephen: Right, I think we’ve got everything.

Ashlie: Here, let me help you with that.

Stephen: No, it’s OK, I’ve got it.

Ashlie: We’re here in the beautiful mountains of Snowdonia in North Wales. We’re here for a short relaxing break. We’re going to put our feet up and have a complete rest for a couple of days. That’s right, isn’t it Stephen?

Stephen: Speak for yourself, Ash. Snowdonia is a great place for outdoor activities. You can go climbing, cycling, walking... I can’t wait to get out onto the mountains and get some fresh air. Come on Ash. Let’s check in.

Receptionist: Hi - Can I help you?

Ashlie: Hi, yes. We have a reservation for two nights.

Receptionist: OK, what’s the name, please?

Ashlie: Walker.

Receptionist: Walker. Is that Stephen and Ashlie?

Ashlie: Yes.

Receptionist: Two rooms for two nights?

Ashlie: Yes.

Receptionist: Can I just get you to fill this in, please?

Ashlie: Sure.

Stephen: Hey Ash, have you seen all these leaflets? There’s loads of stuff to do here. I’m going to hire a bike and ride to the top of the mountain. Do you want to come?

Ashlie: What, now? You’re joking, aren’t you?

Stephen: Yeah – take these, can I have my room key, please? Thank you. I’m going to go get changed. I’ll meet you back here in twenty minutes.

Ashlie: OK.

.....

Ashlie: OK, so I think I'll have the manicure, the pedicure...

Assistant: OK.

Ashlie: Oh, and I’ll have that Indian head massage, too. And can you just tell me, what’s the hot stones massage?

Assistant: Well, we use volcanic rock. You know, stones from a volcano; we heat them up and then we massage them over your body. It’s really relaxing.

Ashlie: Yeah, that sounds nice. Maybe I’ll have that, too. Oh, and I see you do treatments for men?

Assistant: Yeah, we do a lot of treatments for men.

Ashlie: Stephen doesn't know what he's missing.

.....

Ashlie: Look at you!

Stephen: It’s great, isn’t it? I’m all set to go. What are you going to do while I’m racing to the top of the mountain?

Ashlie: Well, I thought I might try this… It looks really relaxing and much better than cycling to the top of some old mountain.

Stephen: Yeah, it looks like hard work.

Ashlie: Go on you, get going. Have a good time – and call me later.

Stephen: Bye.

Ashlie: Bye.

.....

Ashlie: This is just so relaxing.

.....

Ashlie: Hello.

Stephen: Hi, Ashlie.

Ashlie: Hi, Stephen. How are you doing?

Stephen: I’m... exhausted. I can hardly speak.

Ashlie: Me too. This is lovely. I’m so relaxed.

Stephen: Ah, this is really tough. I’ve got a long way to go but I'm going to make it to the top.

Ashlie: OK, then – well you just take it easy.

Stephen: Yeah, alright.

Ashlie: OK, see you later.

Stephen: OK, bye!

Ashlie: Snowden Mountain Railway. I think he’ll see me sooner than he thinks!

Task 1

Comprehension Task

What did you learn about Snowdonia?

Choose the best answer to these questions.

Exercise

Task 2

Comprehension Task 2

Read the statements about Stephen and Ashlie and decide if they are true or false.

Exercise

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Language level

Submitted by Juliya on Sun, 16/12/2018 - 06:08

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Hello, everybody! I'm Juliya! I feel sorry for Stephen. As for me, I prefer jogging, because it's good for my health. Besides, jogging is not exhausting.

Submitted by Juliya on Sat, 15/12/2018 - 18:47

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Poor Stephen... I feel sorry for him. As for me, I prefer walking, because it's good for my health and it isn't exhausting.

Submitted by Nguyen thi Hai Huyen on Fri, 25/05/2018 - 17:40

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Hi, All I don't understand about sentence:"Have a complete rest a couple of days" -A complete rest?what does that mean? What is different between: Get out and go out, When we use relax and relaxing? I'm going to get changed-> changed is noun not Verb, it is right? Thanks

Submitted by Peter M. on Sun, 27/05/2018 - 07:07

In reply to by Nguyen thi Hai Huyen

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Hi Nguyen thi Hai Huyen,

The phrase in the text is have a complete rest for a couple of days. A complete rest means to do nothing: no strenuous activity, no stress and no work. Stephen says "You speak for yourself" because he does not want a complete rest - he wants to be active and to go up the mountain.

Get out and go out can be used in different ways in different contexts. You can find examples in any good dictionary:

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/get-out

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/go-out

If you have a particular example then we can comment, of course.

 

Relax is a verb. Relaxing is an -ing form which could be a participle, a gerund or an adjective. They are used as any of these types of words are used, in accordance with the grammar system of the language. There is nothing special about the words relax and relaxing to make them different from any other words of these types.

In the phrase get changed we have get + a past participle, so changed is a verb form. The construction shows a change of some kind and is quite common in English: get married, get changed, get divorced, get fired, get hired, get promoted etc.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Radek on Mon, 19/02/2018 - 10:47

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I prefer outdoor activities so probably I would like to climb,to walk or to do samething elese but obviesouly outdoor.So I think I would spend my free time in North Wales just like Stephen do.Some different forms of relax is listening to the music or reading books and I would do it probably every evening.

Submitted by Baahubali on Wed, 24/01/2018 - 05:37

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hello, i usually come across with some types of structures like"a variety of,too great a variety of,a great variety of".sometimes it takes singular verb and sometimes plural verb. is any definite rule about it whether it takes singular of plural veb. i checked it in oxford dictionary .it says when a is preceded before variety,it takes plural verb. please give me suitable advice. thanks.

Submitted by Peter M. on Wed, 24/01/2018 - 07:38

In reply to by Baahubali

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Hello Baahubali,

Quantifiers such as a lot of can be followed by either singular uncount nouns or plural count nouns. The verb matches the noun:

There is a lot of money on the table. ['money' is singular so the verb 'is' is singular]

There are a lot of apples on the table. ['apples' is plural so the verb 'are' is plural]

 

The quantifier a great variety of can only be used with plural count nouns and so the verb is always plural. It is similar to other quantifiers such as a great number of.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Baahubali on Thu, 18/01/2018 - 07:23

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hello, sir if there is any rule about it whether we change principal clause or we change subordinate clause to correct whole sentence.if i see it written down somewhere then how would i know whether he is talking about future or past. thanks.

Submitted by Peter M. on Sat, 20/01/2018 - 07:34

In reply to by Baahubali

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Hello Baahubali,

The important thing is that the time references and verbs forms in the clauses are consistent. If they are inconsistent then you can change either to make the sentence grammatical.

The context may make it clear what the speaker/writer intended, but if it does not then you need to ask the speaker/writer directly and find out what it is they wanted to say.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Baahubali on Tue, 16/01/2018 - 08:07

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hello is it right to say "one and a half hours" or "one hour and a half". "two mangoes and a half" or "two and a half mangoes". thanks. which is preferable or right?

Submitted by Peter M. on Wed, 17/01/2018 - 09:39

In reply to by Baahubali

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Hello Baahubali,

Both formulations are possible..

For hours I think the first formulation ('one and a half hours') is most common. For other things the second formulation is more typical.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Baahubali on Tue, 16/01/2018 - 07:17

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hello seek your advice "you need not tell a lie when the judge asked you where you were when the crime was committed." i'm confused whether i should change "asked to ask"or "need not to need not have". tell me which is preferable?

Submitted by Peter M. on Thu, 18/01/2018 - 06:47

In reply to by Baahubali

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Hello Baahubali,

'Need not' seems an odd choice in the original sentence. Are you sure you do not mean 'must not' here?

As far as your question goes, I cannot say how you might change the sentence as I do not know the context or what you are trying to say. Are you talking about a situation in the future (you will be before a judge later) or in the past (the meeting with the judge has already happened)?

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Peter M. on Thu, 18/01/2018 - 06:54

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Hello Baahubali,

There is an inconsistency in the verbs used in the original sentence (which I did not notice in my earlier reply):

You need not tell a lie when the judge asked you where you were when the crime was committed.

As 'asked' refers to a past action you need to use a perfect modal or a past form:

You did not need to tell a lie when the judge asked you where you were when the crime was committed.

or

You needn't have told a lie when the judge asked you where you were when the crime was committed

There is a difference in meaning here. 'Needn't have told a lie' means that the person told a lie and it was not necessary. 'Didn't need to tell a lie' means that it was not necessary but does not tell us whether or not the person actually told the lie.

 

 

You can make both verbs present rather than past:

You need not tell a lie when the judge asks you where you were when the crime was committed.

or

You don't need to tell a lie when the judge asks you where you were when the crime was committed.

There is no difference in meaning here. 'Need not' is a more formal choice and sounds a little archaic. Both sentences use present forms to refer to the future.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nastassiaka84 on Sun, 14/01/2018 - 19:39

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Hallo! Unfortunately the video at this Internet resource does not open - Connection Error! What is the reason? Thanks Best regards

Hello Nastassiaka84,

I'm sorry about that. It sounds to me like a temporary error, but I'm not sure. I've just checked the video and this page and don't see any errors, and I'm able to watch the video. Are you able to see the video now? If not, please try using a different device and/or browser. If you still can't see it, could you please tell us what browser and browser version you're using? It would also be useful to know if you can see videos on other pages of our site, e.g.:

Thanks and once again, I'm sorry for the inconvenience.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by jang hyuk on Tue, 21/11/2017 - 09:52

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I love this "word on the street". I want to practice my listening skills with this program. However, unlike other program, I cannot find MP3 file for this. Can I get MP3 audio file for this series?

Hello jang hyuk,

We make audio files available for download on our audio-only pages but I'm afraid we cannot do this for our video pages for both technical and legal reasons. These videos are produced in partnership with other organisations such as the BBC and so there are limitations regarding copyright.

I'm glad you find the series helpful!

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Trinh Phuong Anh on Sat, 09/09/2017 - 16:18

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Hello Learning Team Seek your advise 1:The meaning of " I'm going to go changed"? Why dont we say "..... go change"? 2: The meaning of " make it to the top"? Why dont we say " ride to the top". Thanks Best regards

Hello Trinh Phuong Anh,

The sentence is actually a little different, as you can see if you check the transcript. The exact sentence is 'I’m going to go get changed'. We use 'get' with a past participle in certain expressions: 'get changed', 'get dressed', 'get checked', 'get fired' and so on. Many of these have a passive meaning but not all. They are best learned as semi-fixed expressions.

The phrase 'make it to the top' means 'succeed in getting to the top'. It doesn't tell us how the person gets there (walking, riding etc), but it does tell us that it was not easy and that doing it was an achievement.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by frog21sk on Sat, 15/07/2017 - 23:44

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Does a couple of days mean two days or more?

Hello frog21sk,

Yes, that is correct. 'A couple of days' usually means 'a few days' rather than being strictly two days. It may be two, three, four or so, but would not normally be more than that, I would say.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by sajjadashraf700 on Sun, 02/07/2017 - 14:36

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I am a nature loving person since my childhood and I often go to hilly areas after school hours(as I am a teacher by profession)there used to be remain for hours climbing the hills as well as doing lot of exercises,gradually along with passage of time i used to ponder upon how did these big mountains and hills come into existence millions years ago,subsequently,i started my research and one day i saw an object at some distance which was glittering so necessarily I went near and picked it and brought to my home,in fact, it was a peace of stone in a quite circular formation.however,i compare it with other resembling fossils found on web pages,consequently this discovery enhanced my enthusiasm and i expanded my research area.you would be surprised to know that at present I've more than 500 fossils which categorically reveal significant evolution processes of the planet earth as well as the evolution processes of the primitive animals. In shot, nature is man's best companion ,as it doesn't betray you where as all living things can do. I would like to say that infants ,small children and truthful people are also part of nature because all objects fall under definition of nature which are harmless to humanity,just like nature itself.

Submitted by sajjadashraf700 on Sun, 02/07/2017 - 14:14

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certainly, excursions like these are healthy activities which obviously are necessary to keep us mentally,spiritually,physically and socially active.

Submitted by labeb Najip Abdullah on Wed, 28/06/2017 - 14:17

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I love those places.. natural views.

Submitted by Vrindalee on Mon, 29/05/2017 - 08:22

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My favourite outdoor activities are trekking and hiking. In India, we have thousands of forts and temples situated on hills, amidst the nature. So, me and my friends often enjoy climbing the hills nearby.

Submitted by Adriancatanescu on Wed, 24/05/2017 - 11:55

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Hello everyone. I think I'm more an outdoor person, who prefers to spend more time in the nature and when I choose the way to relax, most of the time my prefers are to be in nature.I like to go hiking somewhere in the nature and to see all the plants and trees that you don't usually see in the city. I like to listen the birds' chirp while I enjoy the fresh air and be connected with nature and just get your relax.

Submitted by tamer_bahr on Sun, 14/05/2017 - 19:17

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I am like Stephen I like to make sport and try some new things.

Submitted by M. Ali on Mon, 01/05/2017 - 06:10

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Can I just 'get you' to fill this in, please? What does it mean

Hello M. Ali,

As a verb 'get' has 17 different meanings in the Cambridge Dictionary. Here, it means 'persuade' -- see the second explanation under the 'cause' entry.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by nt.hcmc on Sun, 23/04/2017 - 03:57

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Excuse me, I tried to find the meaning of Ashlie's saying "Go on you" in the dictionary and on the internet but I cannot find anything closely related. So can you explain it to me? How should I understand it? Thank you.

Hello Abby Nguyen,

'Go on...' can have several meanings. Most often we say 'go on...' when we want to encourage someone to do something. For example, a sports fan might should 'Go on United!' to encourage his or her team. We can also say 'Go on you!'

However, here the meaning is different. Here Ashlie is saying 'Go on you, get going' to mean 'Off you go' or 'Don't just stand there, get busy!'. It's a humorous way to end the conversation.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by gianfil on Fri, 07/04/2017 - 05:16

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hi.why cant we say i am going to get changed?going to go isnt is too much?thank you

Hi gianfil,

I'm not sure why you ask 'why can't we say..' because we can say this. It's perfectly fine to say 'I am going to get changed'. You could also say 'I'm going to go and get changed' or 'I'm going to go get changed', all with very similar meanings. I think the first of these is the most elegant but all are correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Mustafa93 on Thu, 06/04/2017 - 10:00

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Hello,firstly I want to thanks the British Council Team for their huge effort to teach us the English language. but all the videos did not work with my, I get Connection Error all the time . so if there are alternative ways to access these videos helps me please. Mustafa, Sudan

Hello Mustafa,

Thanks very much your kind words! I'm afraid that a Connection Error usually indicates a temporary server problem or a problem on your end. I've checked this video and a few others just in case, and they are all working for me now. If they're not working for you, I'd recommend trying to see them on a different device or web browser, as this sometimes can also help.

If not, you might want to consider trying our audio content. Our Elementary Podcasts, for example, can be downloaded and we've never had a user unable to listen to them.

If there's any other way we can help you, please let us know.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Mustafa I'm also saw this problem but finally I got them and enjoyed. So take our teacher's advice, use other divace or browser, I hope you will enjoy it. Good lucky Mustafa

Submitted by r.crawford on Tue, 28/03/2017 - 21:17

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Dear LearnEnglish team, First of all, thanks for your great educational tools. Using them in my English classes gives my students the opportunity to learn language and culture in an enjoyable way. Because our school is in Italy, it's not always possible to view the videos. We get the "connection error" message. Why does this happen? It's such a shame! Could you please tell me that there's an answer to this problem? Some of your videos have been uploaded to Youtube, and I send my students there. However, there are still many that can't be viewed in Italy. Looking forward to hearing from you, Rosie

Hello r.crawford,

It's nice to hear that our materials are helpful! There are sometimes problems with access in some countries, but these are rather countries which limit or control internet access as part of their political or legal systems, and Italy is clearly not such a country. I suspect, therefore, that the problem is either related to your system or device or is caused by a local security setting, such as a firewall which blocks certain content.

To test the former, I suggest trying to access the videos using a different device and/or browser. Try using a desktop or laptop computer which you do not usually use (mobile devices can have problems with some media formats). If the videos work then you will know it is a hardware issue and that you need to use a different device.

To test the latter, try accessing LearnEnglish from another location, using a different network (a WiFi network which is not part of the school system). If you can access the media through a different network then you will know that it is a security/network issue and can ask a technician to whitelist LearnEnglish and allow connections.

I hope you can solve this problem. There is not really anything we can do to help with such local issues, I'm afraid. All that we can do is ensure that our pages are working correctly, which they are.

 

Best wishes and good luck,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Reddy_Rabby on Sun, 26/03/2017 - 08:49

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I’m going to go get changed - what does it mean?which is the grammatical structure?

Hello Reddy_Rabby,

There is a construction which is used to express intentions which is quite common in spoken English. It is

go and do something

Example: I'd like to go and speak to him.

The meaning is something like 'go there in order to'.

In your example the 'and' is omitted, which is not unusual in infomal language.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Fabio Gutterre… on Wed, 01/02/2017 - 00:03

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Thanks for this activity. It keeps helping me a lot in my classes and the students really like it. ;)

Submitted by karate77 on Tue, 31/01/2017 - 19:20

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Hello everyone,it's my first time on this site. I would improve my english for my job,my life and travel without language problems. I hope. thanks in advance for your help. best regards

Submitted by florinc27 on Tue, 10/01/2017 - 10:10

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Last month i start working out at gym.It' s feel very exhausting.