Snowdon Scene 2

Ashlie surprises Stephen by beating him to the top of the mountain.

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the transcript at any time.

Preparation

Before you watch

Think about the following questions:

  • How is Ashlie going to travel to the top of Snowden?
  • Who do you think will get to the top first?

Watch Ashlie and Stephen as they make their way to the top of the mountain.

Transcript

Transcript

Ashlie: Hi. Can I have a return ticket, please?

Ticket Seller: Yes, of course you can.

Ashlie: Brilliant. How much is that?           

Ticket Seller: Twenty-five pounds, please.

Ashlie: Great. Thank you. Twenty-five. And when is the next train?

Ticket Seller: Four o’clock.

Ashlie: Four p.m. Thank you very much.

Ticket Seller: Thank you.

Ashlie: This is the Snowdon Mountain Railway. Now, this train goes all the way from here, up to the top of the mountain. It’s a steam train so it is quite slow but I’m sure I’ll get to the top before Stephen. Now, I must take some photos.

Train Driver: Yeah – that looks good – nice one! OK then?

Ashlie: Thank you. That’s lovely. Are you the train driver?

Train Driver: Yes, I drive these locomotives and I’ve done so for about 29 years now.

Ashlie: So how long does it take to get to the top?

Train Driver: Just under an hour.

Ashlie: Under an hour? It must be pretty high then. How high is it?

Train Driver: It's about 1000 metres and it is the highest mountain in England and Wales. And it gets very cold there as well, so if I were you, I’d wear something a little warmer!

Ashlie: Don’t worry, I've got a big coat.

Train Man: That’s good.

Ashlie: Thank you.

Train Man: You’re welcome, bye.

Ashlie: What an amazing train!

.....

Stephen: Ashlie! What are you doing here? How did you get here?

Ashlie: Oh, hiya Stephen. What an amazing place. You know, it’s a shame about the view though.

Stephen: What an amazing place? How did you get here?

Ashlie: Well, I got the train, of course. You know, it’s much easier than cycling.

Stephen: You got the train!? You mean to say while I’ve been riding up the mountain all afternoon, you….

Ashlie: Oh, and I also got a spa treatment. Look, aren’t they lovely?

Stephen: You’re unbelievable!

Ashlie: You look exhausted, Stephen. Come on, shall we go and get a coffee or a sandwich or something?

Stephen: A sandwich? You’re on the top of a mountain! It isn’t some kind of High Street, you know.

Ashlie: Follow me.

.....

Stephen: Just what we needed; a café at the top of the mountain.

Ashlie: OK, what are you having, Stephen? 

Stephen: Hmm. I’ll have a coffee and one of these, a cheese sandwich.

Ashlie: I think I’ll have the soup and I’ll have a hot chocolate.

Waiter: Hi there. Can I take your order, please?

Ashlie: Yes please, I’ll have a soup and a hot chocolate and he’ll have a cheese sandwich and a coffee, please.

Waiter: Can I get you anything else?

Stephen: Yes, I was just wondering – it must be fun working here on the mountain. But how do you get to work everyday – you don’t cycle, do you?

Waiter: No, we don’t. There’s an early train, a special train for all the staff who need to come up every morning.

Stephen: And what happens when the weather gets really bad? Do you ever get stuck up here? 

Waiter: We do, we do get stuck sometimes. If the weather turns really bad, there’s accommodation for the staff to stay overnight.

Stephen: Sounds cosy!

Waiter: Very cosy indeed. I’ll just get your order for you now.

Ashlie: Great, thank you very much. See, you should have got the train.

.....

Stephen: Right. Time to make a move. It should be easier going downhill.

Ashlie: It’s easy for me. I’m going to catch the last train home. In fact, I wonder what time the last train is…

Stephen: Ashlie, is it a small red and green train? Like that one?

Ashlie: Oh, no! Wait! Ah, Stephen I’ve missed the last train!

Stephen: Come on Ash, jump on. I'll give you a lift! You on?

Ashlie: Not too fast!

 

Task 1

Comprehension Task

Do you know anywhere where you can travel on steam trains in your country?

Answer these questions.

Exercise

Task 2

Comprehension Task

Can you fill in the gaps in the sentences with the correct numbers?

Exercise

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Language level

Submitted by parisaach on Sun, 19/04/2020 - 05:14

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Hello . I love these videos of Ashlie and Stephen . Can anybody help me about the meaning of this sentence: "it' s a shame about the view"

Hello parisaach

I'm glad to hear it. Ashley thinks it's a beautiful place, but is disappointed that the clouds are making it difficult to appreciate the view. The 'view' is what you can see from a place; we often speak about the view from the top of buildings or mountains such as this one.

Does that make sense?

Nice to see you here again.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Martin_Laborde on Sat, 23/06/2018 - 23:11

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Hello! When the ticket seller responses to Ashlie he said "yes for sure". Am I right?. Because in the transcrip he said "of course you can" Thank you

Submitted by Peter M. on Mon, 25/06/2018 - 07:09

In reply to by Martin_Laborde

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Hello Martin_Laborde,

I think the ticket seller says 'Yes, of course you can', as in the transcript. It's a little difficult to hear because the introductory music is still playing, but that is what I hear.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by btriton on Sun, 27/05/2018 - 18:35

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nice videos, I like them , it's encourage me to follow all of your resources. I need improve mainly my Listening skills, it becomes very hard for me.

Submitted by Nguyen thi Hai Huyen on Mon, 19/03/2018 - 14:59

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can help me: A very cosy indeed. Indeed"

Hi Nguyen,

In this case, 'indeed' is used for emphasis. The waiter agrees with Stephen when Stephen says that it sounds cosy. If you follow the link, you can see a few other examples of 'indeed' used this way.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Alice RWL on Wed, 11/10/2017 - 22:04

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Oh! I'm sorry. I just read the comments below. Sorry to bother you. T_T

Submitted by Alice RWL on Wed, 11/10/2017 - 22:02

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In task 2, item 5: Snowdon is 1,000 metres tall. I would say "Snowdon is 1,000 metres high" Is it normal to say "tall" for the height of the mountain?

Submitted by mebarek on Wed, 27/09/2017 - 11:29

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hello i just wanna know what's my listening level if i can understand almost everything in those videos and also if am ready to pass the ielts exam thank you

Submitted by Peter M. on Thu, 28/09/2017 - 07:24

In reply to by mebarek

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Hello mebarek,

The level of this series is on the page above: B1. You can search for material at this or higher levels using our content search page.

As far as IELTS goes, the exam can be taken by anyone. There is no pass mark per se, but rather a score which represents your current level. I think the best thing for you would be to visit our site for IELTS candidates (TakeIELTS), where you can find information about the test, tips and advice, sample materials with answers and mock exams which you can use to assess your level.

 

Best wishes and good luck!

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Sukie on Tue, 19/09/2017 - 21:50

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Hi. I'd like to ask about "how high is it?" In this case 'high' is being used for mountains but I know in some cases 'tall' is used for mountains too. Is there any difference? Are both used for trees and buildings too?

Hi Sukie,

This is a question of collocation, which means which words are used most often together. There is a good summary in the Cambridge dictionary (here).

Please note that sometimes we use words creatively, deliberately choosing an unusual description to catch the listener's ear (or the reader's eye), or to create a particular image. This is the case with 'tall' used to describe mountains: it is unusual but does occur from time to time.

Tress are tall, though we could call them high in a poem or story to grab the reader's attention. Buildings can be described as either tall or high, with tall generally suggesting something thin such as a tower.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Sukie on Thu, 21/09/2017 - 05:30

In reply to by Peter M.

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Thank you for the explanation, Peter. I read the Cambridge dictionary page too. So, probably the Shard is very 'tall' rather than very 'high'- hope I'm right? Yes collocation- to me it's kind of a big project in learning English. All I can do is just try to get as much exposure to English as possible (like this website) and learn one by one. It's fun though! Thanks again Sukie

Hello Sukie,

That's right. You can use 'high' here but 'tall' is much more likely.

In fact you can see this on the wikipedia page for the building. Both 'high' and 'tall' are used, but 'tall' is used more:

 

Standing 309.7 metres (1,016 ft) high, the Shard is the tallest building in the United Kingdom, the fourth-tallest building in Europe and the 96th-tallest building in the world.[1][16][17] It is also the second-tallest free-standing structure in the United Kingdom, after the concrete tower at the Emley Moor transmitting station.[18]

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by langkhach on Mon, 11/09/2017 - 03:46

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Hello The English Team, Would you mind helping to explain the meaning of the phrase "eat or be eaten"? I came across it while watching the movie series "Friends". Thanks a bunch. Phan Hong Van

Hello langkhach,

This is an idiom which means something similar to 'kill or be killed' - it tells us that either you if you do not defeat your opponent then they will defeat you. It is used metaphorically to describe competitions in which there must be a winner and a loser.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by LiliyaSun on Sat, 02/09/2017 - 06:46

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Hello. I have a question about the phrase "I've just got to pop out to...". I get the meaning but I can't undestand why we use "I've just got" and don't use just "I will just pop out..."? "Have got" means possession. But what does it mean in this sentence?

Hello LulliyaSun,

[Have got to + verb} has the same meaning as [have to + verb] but is a rather more informal way to express it. It means that this is something we must do for some reason.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Tuấn31195 on Fri, 23/06/2017 - 14:58

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Hi The LearnEnglish Team Please explain to me the following sentence: Stephen: Come on Ash, jump on. I'll give you a lift! You on? what does "i'll give you a lift! You on?" means? Thanks

Hello Tuấn31195,

You can find 'jump on' and 'lift' in the Cambridge Dictionary (follow the links). 'You on?' is an abbreviated form of '(Are) you on?' Stephen is offering to take Ashlie down the mountain on his bike!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Adriancatanescu on Fri, 26/05/2017 - 21:14

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Good evening. We could have a long long chat about mountains,they are my favorite.I like to visit them during the winter when the snow cover all the land and you can play with snowballs and can enjoy all the sports game during this season,my favorite one is the sleigh. But I like as well in the summer when you can go hiking in the time when in the city's very hot and you can go to the mountain just to take some fresh air and relax. in my country we we have a lot of mountains most of them they are really known in Europe I think the highest top of the mountain in my country is named OMU. This name comes from a big stone, on the top there is a big rock that has a shape that looks really like a face of a human, and OMU in my language means person. Usually I'm going to the mountain using a car or train but most of the time I prefer the train but the train is not like here, it didn't go up to the top. Same of the mountains have cable car which is really really good but most of the time if you want to get to the top of the mountain you have to go hiking and go walk you can go cycling because he's very steep.

Submitted by nt.hcmc on Sun, 23/04/2017 - 04:22

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Hello The English Team, Why does Ashlie say "It’s a shame about the view though" whereas in the previous sentence she said "What an amazing place"? Were there anything wrong with the view? These two sentences are quite confusing to me. Thank you so much.

Hello Abby Nguyen,

Ashlie makes the comment because there is no view because of the mist which is obscuring it.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Tuan Hung on Tue, 07/02/2017 - 14:46

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Excuse me. I don't understand the meaning of Stephen in this phrase '' You’re on the top of a mountain! It isn't some kind of High Street, you know.''. He wants to unfair, doesn't he ????

Hello Tuan Hung,

Ashlie suggests that they get a coffee and Stephen does not think that this is very realistic, so he is being a little bit sarcastic in his reply, pointing out that it's not so easy to get a coffee on a mountain. Of course, he is wrong and Ashlie is right, because there is a cafe!

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Vartica Singh on Sun, 22/01/2017 - 18:44

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The train driver said i've done so for about 29 years now..can he say in this way-'I,ve been doing this for 29 years' and in another case can he say 'if were you i would have worn something warmer'

Submitted by Vartica Singh on Sun, 22/01/2017 - 12:33

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what did ashlie mean by 'it's a shame about the view though'?

Hello Vartica,

We say 'it's a shame' when we are disappointed about something. In this case, Ashlie is disappointed that the view is obscured by the clouds.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nizam Balinese on Thu, 12/01/2017 - 06:08

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Hi Team. Please help me with these : Ashlie : ........ now, I must take some photos. Can I switch MUST with HAVE TO here? What is difference between MUST and HAVE TO? ---------------------------- Ashlie : ....... He'll HAVE a cheese sandwich and a coffee, please. =============== Can I switch HAVE with HAS here? Thank you.

Hi Nizam Balinese,

Both must and have to can be used in this context.

Must and have to have similar meanings. Both are used to express obligation, but when the obligation is our own (our choice) then we tend to use must. When the obligation is from elsewhere (a rule, a law, someone in authority) then we tend to use have to. This is not a fixed difference however, but rather a tendency. You can read more about this on this page.

After modal verbs, such as will, we use the base form (the infinitive without 'to'). Therefore has is not possible in place of have.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team