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Farming Scene 1 - Language Focus

Rob explains how to use ‘should’, ‘should have’ and some expressions used in giving directions.

Watch the video. Then go to Task and do the activities.

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Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hello Rama Santoso,

Not exactly. Please see my response to shams just a bit further down this page, where I explain this difference in more detail.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I am no sure about it:

You should have come with us or You should have came with us.

Someone can explain it please.

thank you.

Hello AlanisyGerard1023,

'should have come' is the correct form. This is the modal verb 'should' followed be a perfect infinitive, which is formed from 'have' + the past participle (third form). 'came' is the past simple, not the past participle.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, guys good morning! Watching the video I found something really interesting. I discovered that " Should have " is always followed by " Past Participle ", furthermore " Past Participle " is used even with " Could have " and " Would have ".

- Should have
- Could have + Past Participle
- Would have

Hi
1- when i use go cross and go along ? i did't understand
2- what's the name the like person to scared a bird in farm ?

Hello shams,

In 'go along', 'along' means that you follow a more-or-less straight line. For example, you can go along a street, go along the riverside, go along a path, etc.

In 'go across', 'across' means that you go from one side of something to the other side. So, for example, you can go across an area (such as a field) or go across a line (such as a street or bridge).

I'm afraid I don't completely understand your second question, so if I don't answer it, please ask us again in other words. The thing that scares Ashlie is a scarecrow.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello quoc hung,

It's important to think of the shape of the object of the preposition. A street, river, path, etc. are essentially lines. A park or town square is usually rectangular or square.

You can go 'across' a rectangle, square or line, because you go from one side to the other. But you can't go 'along' a square or rectangle, like a park or town square. You could say, however, that you go along the side of a park or town square, since the shape of the side is a line.

Does that make sense?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

 

Hello quoc hung,

Yes, you're right! You can certainly go across a line (e.g. a bridge) as well. I'm going to edit my reply from Friday so that no one else gets confused. Thanks very much for pointing this out to us and I'm sorry for the confusion!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello quoc hung,

I'm sorry for the confusion. It can be difficult to explain the way a language is used, because it's not always consistent or logical.

With a bridge, I would suggest you think about what you are doing at the bridge. If you are using it go from one side of a river (or street or whatever) to the other, then you go across the bridge. It's true that a bridge is a line, but we normally conceive of it as a way to get from one place to another rather than as a line that you spend time following (even though that is also true).

On the other hand, if you are following the side of a bridge -- this is a somewhat strange concept, as this would not be possible with most bridges -- then you would be going along the bridge. But I can't think of many situations where this would be useful.

You might also want to do an internet search for 'across the bridge' and 'along the bridge' to look for examples of how people have used these phrases.

I hope this helps. If not, please don't hesitate to ask again.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello quoc hung,

Since 'go along a bridge' is quite unusual, I'm going to leave the exercise as is. But thank you for your suggestion!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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