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Snowdon Scene 1 - Language Focus

Rob the teacher talks about tag questions. Try some activities to practise this language.

Watch the video and then do the tasks. 

Task 1

Language Task

Complete the sentence with the right question tag.

Exercise

Task 2

Language Task

Read the sentences with tag questions and choose those that are correct.

Exercise

Task 3

Language Task

Choose the best answer to these questions.

Exercise

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

The question "I'm good at this, aren't I?" sounds incorrect to me, I think that the correct form is "I'm good at this, am not I?.
Can you help me?

Hello sandrosmiranda,

Actually, that form, as odd as it seems, is in fact correct. You could also say 'am I not' (notice the different word order), but this is an unusual form that would be inappropriately formal in most common situations – I'd suggest you use the other form. By the way, there is more on this topic in general on our question tags page.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Mr.Kirk.Please explain that why is the fifth sentence from above in the task 2 is different than all ''You don't have any pet,have you? as per rule this is the correct sentence but your system showing that the correct sentence is ''You don't have any pet,do you?

Hello M.Khan,

We use the tag 'have you' (or 'haven't you') when 'have' is the auxiliary verb. For example:

You haven't got any pets, have you?

You haven't bought a new dog, have you?

However, when 'have' is the main verb (not an auxiliary verb) we use 'do you' (or 'don't you'). In this example, 'have' is the main verb:

You don't have any pets, do you?

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks You,Sir Peter.

What Rob told about question tag, that was clear and simple. Thanks.

Hello

I am not sure about the question,You don't smoke,do you? You do? mean Are you smoke?

Hello pathomporn,

In this question, 'do you?' is a question tag. Please see the question tags page in our Quick Grammar and the video on our Snowdon Language Focus page for more on how these are used.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

can you explain 'speak for yourself' further?

Hello ali,

You can find this in our dictionary – see the search box under Cambridge Dictionaries Online in the lower right corner of the page.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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