Adjectives

Adjectives are words that give more information about a noun or pronoun and can go in different positions in a sentence.

Adjectives are words that give more information about a noun or pronoun and can go in different positions in a sentence.

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how adjectives are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Mon, 28/11/2022 - 15:50

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Hello. Could you please help me? Which sentence is correct? Why?
- We had a few minutes walk to the shops.
- We had a few minutes' walk to the shops.
- We had a few-minute walk to the shops.
Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

I'd recommend the second one. People often leave out the apostrophe (as in the first one), but it's not correct in writing without it.

The third option is an interesting one. As far as I know, it is grammatically well-formed, but I don't think anyone would use it naturally. People do say things like 'a five-minute walk', but I don't think I've ever said, heard or read 'a few-minute'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Tue, 01/11/2022 - 08:22

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Hello. Could you please help me? Which word is correct in the following sentence? Why?
- It was a ......... successful year.
(spectacular - spectacularly)
Thank you.

Hi Ahmed Imam,

I think "spectacularly" is the better option. "Spectacularly successful" is quite a common collocation. You can see more examples of it here: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/spectacularly-successful

"Spectacular" may be possible, as an adjective describing "year". However, since both adjectives here are quite long, I would expect most people would use a comma or linking word between them, to clarify the structure.

  • It was a spectacular, successful year.
  • It was a spectacular and successful year.

I hope that helps.

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Lamastry on Tue, 02/08/2022 - 10:31

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What is the difference between day off and off day

Hi Lamastry,

A "day off" is a day when you don't need to work. For example, if you work from Monday to Friday, then Saturday and Sunday are your days off.

An "off day" is a day when you don't do something as well as you normally do. For example, if a football player normally plays very well but today they played badly, you can say that they had an off day today.

I hope that helps!

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Fri, 22/07/2022 - 17:01

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Hello. Could you please help me understand the difference between "newly-born babies" and "new-born babies"?
Thank you.

Hi Ahmed Imam,

Actually, it's the same case as in my previous message about "deeply rooted". Most dictionaries and guides would write it as "newly born babies" (without a hyphen), but as I mentioned before, not all writers actually follow these guidelines! 

"New" can be an adverb, so "new-born babies" is also possible (as well as other hyphenated constructions such as "new-found", e.g. "new-found freedom"). However, it's more common to use "newborn" (unhyphenated), which exists as a word by itself. See this entry in the Cambridge Dictionary: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/learner-english/newborn

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Profile picture for user Ahmed Imam

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Wed, 20/07/2022 - 15:50

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Hello. Could you please help me understand the difference between "deeply-rooted" and "deep-rooted"?
Thank you.

Hi Ahmed Imam,

Most dictionaries and guides say that a hyphen should not be used after an adverb ending in -ly, so it should be "deeply rooted" instead of "deeply-rooted" (for example, see the "Hyphenating "-ly" adverbs" section from Merriam-Webster: https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/6-common-hypercorrections-and-how-to-avoid-them). Although many writers do actually use a hyphen after an -ly adverb, those sources would consider it a mistake.

However, hyphens are used after adverbs that do not end in -ly, e.g. "well-known" and "much-loved". The word "deep" is also an adverb, so we can make the hyphenated compound "deep-rooted".

I hope that helps.

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team