Pronouns

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. We often use them to avoid repeating the nouns that they refer to. Pronouns have different forms for the different ways we use them. 

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how pronouns are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

Choose a topic and start improving your English grammar today. 
 

Take your language skills and your career to the next level
Get unlimited access to our self-study courses for only £5.99/month.

Hello Ellenna,

Both 'on' and 'in' are used with 'chair', though I'd say 'on' is more common. In many cases they mean the same thing, but in some specific contexts, 'on' could emphasise being on the surface of the chair, whereas 'in' could imply a chair (e.g. an armchair) that is larger and which in a sense contains the person sitting in (or 'on'!) it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by SonuKumar on Tue, 30/05/2017 - 05:49

Permalink
Sir, "Not as many people go to New York in summer as (go to) London" Should I use (GO TO) here or are they optional and Is it a right sentence using Not as many people if not, Please you make it for me and let me know if I could use Not that many or Not so many in this sentence ?

Hello SonuKumar,

'go to' (or also just 'go') can be omitted or can remain in this sentence and all versions are correct. This is called ellipsis.

'not that many' wouldn't be correct in this case, but 'not so many' is OK. 'not that many' means something like 'not very many' -- these are not correct in this kind of comparative structure. They are correct in other contexts, e.g. in a short answer ('How many people came to the party?' -- 'Not that many').

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by SonuKumar on Sat, 27/05/2017 - 12:47

Permalink
Sir, There go less people to New York than London In summer. Could I also use a small number of people or a less number of people here ? And are there any other ways to make the same sentence using as many people as or as many as people ?

Hello SonuKumar,

With 'people', which is a count noun, you should use the quantifier 'fewer' rather than 'less'. 'small' does indeed collocate with the word 'number', but 'less' does not in most cases. You could say 'not as many people' if you needed to rewrite the sentence using the word 'many'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by SonuKumar on Thu, 25/05/2017 - 14:01

Permalink
Sir, What is the best and more acceptable way to say this thing, ( .1 Not that many people go there, As many as come here) ( 2. There don't go there, As many people as come here) (3. There go a small number of people there than here) (4.Here come a large number of people than here) ? And tell me what mistake I'm making here forming these sentences and if all are wrong, then what is right ? Please help

Hello SonuKumar,

I'm afraid I don't understand what you are trying to say. You need to explain the situation (how many places there are and how many people go to them) and then perhaps we can help you.

We're happy to try to help you find the language for a particular situation you might need but it's not possible for us to explain and correct lists of sentences like this. That is something you might do together with your teacher, not via the comments section on a page like this.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by safawad on Thu, 25/05/2017 - 13:41

Permalink
Which is correct 1- Driving cars causes air pollution 2- Driving cars cause air pollution and Why ??

Hello safawad,

The subject here is 'driving cars' and that is a singular form because 'driving' is singular; 'cars' just tells us what kind of driving it is. Therefore the verb must also be singular and 'causes' is correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Ellenna on Wed, 24/05/2017 - 09:39

Permalink
Could you explain please the use of the present tense in the following sentences: 1. It's time we took action to stop the forgery. 2. It's time I was leaving. It's not clear enough for me why It's time is used here and not it was time. Thank you in advance!

Hello Ellenna,

'it's time + subject + past simple' is a kind of fixed expression. The first verb is always 'is' (or possibly 'was' if we are talking about the past, but that is not so common I think) and the second verb is in the past simple, even though it's suggesting a present or future action.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by SonuKumar on Thu, 18/05/2017 - 09:11

Permalink
Many people were mad there and, Many of them were mad there. Now is there any difference between these two sentences except writing difference and yes, One last question, Could you please tell me if the word Too is used for the subject I or for verb stumble in this sentence " The road of life is hard, You may stumble too" ? Please help

Hello SonuKumar,

'many people' and 'many of them' could mean the same thing, but don't necessarily mean the same. The second one is also more specific than the first.

In the 'road of life' sentence, it's not clear which word 'too' is modifying -- as you suggest, it could be either 'you' or 'may stumble'. If you wanted it to be clear that it modifies the subject, you could say 'you, too, may stumble'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by SonuKumar on Thu, 18/05/2017 - 08:59

Permalink
Sir, In this sentence, Three of them are my brothers. It means that, There are some boys but three of them are my brothers but, If I say that, The three of them are my brothers so, Does it mean that, There are just three boys and, Does The make difference or not and, Are there some more way to say this thing, If I have more then two or three brothers ?

Hello SonuKumar,

Your explanation is quite correct - well done. You could also say the second sentence as follows:

All of them are my brothers

All three of them are my brothers.

The three of them are my brothers.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by irfanhanif970 on Wed, 17/05/2017 - 19:50

Permalink
Hi sir, Which one is correct? "I'm still waiting to payment?" or " I'm still awaiting for payment" and the second question is: "After complete the project, You will send the files. or After completed the project, You will send the files. Thanks in advance!

Submitted by Kirk on Thu, 18/05/2017 - 07:16

In reply to by irfanhanif970

Permalink

Hello irfanhanif,

That depends on what you mean. Are you the person who will pay? Or are you the person expecting to be paid?

As for the second, neither is correct, I'm afraid. Prepositions (like 'after') are followed by -ing forms: 'After completing the project' is the correct form. I'm afraid it's also difficult to say for sure that 'you will send the files' is correct because I don't understand your intentions here. Are you describing a process? Give instructions? Speaking about a plan you've agreed on? The verb form might need to change depending on what you mean. See our Future plans page for more on this.

We're happy to help with questions like yours, but as you can see, we generally need more information to be able to answer them.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Ellenna on Mon, 08/05/2017 - 07:32

Permalink
How should I make the following question: "Is the climate the same in all regions of your country or it varies?" or "Is the climate the same in all regions of your country or does it vary?" Thank you!

Hello Ellenna,

The second version is the correct one.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Ellenna on Sat, 29/04/2017 - 10:31

Permalink
Which is correct: "I belive in prayer's power" or "I believe in the power of prayer"? Could you explain this please?

Hello Ellenna,

Both are grammatically correct, but the first would be very unusual, so I wouldn't use it. In general, 'of' is used with inanimate or abstract nouns such as 'prayer', e.g. you'd also say 'the power of friendship' or 'the power of waves'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team
 

Submitted by rovin kumar on Fri, 28/04/2017 - 02:06

Permalink
When we are not sure if we are talking about a man or a woman we use they/them. but below in this question we talking about johnson then why we using They I don't know why I invited the Johnsons. _________ don't really like parties

Hello rovin kumar,

We use 'they' here because 'the Johnsons' is plural. It describes the whole Johnson family. Similarly we could talk about 'the Smiths' (the whole Smith family), 'the Browns' (the whole Brown family) and so on.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by zehra yildiz on Thu, 27/04/2017 - 18:37

Permalink
Hello British Council I couldn't find the "Causative" so i ask you here. Why do we say "He was made to sleep" ?why do we add "to"?As far as i know,we only add "to" when we use "get".So i havent understood it's being there.I hope to hear from you soon. Regards

Hello zehra yildiz,

'Make' here has the same meaning as 'force' or 'compel'. It is a strange verb in a way because the way it is used changes according to whether it is passive or active:

I made him sleep. [active, followed by the infinitive without 'to']

He was made to sleep. [passive, followed by the infinitive with 'to']

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by irfanhanif970 on Wed, 26/04/2017 - 09:24

Permalink
Thank you so much!

Submitted by irfanhanif970 on Tue, 25/04/2017 - 17:43

Permalink
Hello, Could you please tell me, Which one is correct sentence? After passing 3 days, Client didn't yet approve the files. or After 3 days, Client not yet approved the files thank you in advance! Irfan

Submitted by Peter M. on Wed, 26/04/2017 - 07:15

In reply to by irfanhanif970

Permalink

Hello  irfanhanif970,

Neither of these are entirely correct. I think the best way to express it would be as follows:

After three days the client had still not approved the files,

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Yulduz M on Tue, 18/04/2017 - 08:59

Permalink
Hello everyone! Would it be possible to clarify my question please?! What is the difference between those and these? F.e can I use "these" in this sentence?- " In these two ends of the island swimming not allowed" or " In those" . Thank you in anticipation! Yulduz

Hello Yulduz,

'this' (or 'these') and 'that' (or 'those') are explained on this page. There are also more examples on this Cambridge Dictionary page. Which one you should use depends a lot on the context. For example, if you've just been talking about the two ends of the island in the previous sentence, 'these' would probably be better.

I hope this helps you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by manou84 on Sun, 16/04/2017 - 13:05

Permalink
thank you britishcounsel

Submitted by Imran 26 on Sat, 15/04/2017 - 07:56

Permalink
thank you Sir Kirk and thanks for British Council.

Submitted by Nurdiin11 on Thu, 13/04/2017 - 18:35

Permalink
Hi i would really like to get a partner to speak with English so that i can improve my pronunciations and i will also like to get interact with other people in different ways Is there Anyway you can help me with that?

Submitted by Peter M. on Fri, 14/04/2017 - 07:36

In reply to by Nurdiin11

Permalink

Hi Nurdin11,

I'm afraid that we do not provide a service like this on LearnEnglish and in fact we ask users not to provide any contact information on the site for data protection reasons. We have to be very careful with such issues as we have some users who may be under 18 years of age.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Imran 26 on Thu, 13/04/2017 - 10:54

Permalink
Dear Sir, I am still confuse about that where should I begin to learn English. should I 1st grip on Noun,Pronoun, Articles or other else. I have read some books there 1st lesson is Noun. some books contain Article. what should I do to learn English in elementary level.

Hello Imran 26,

Grammar is just one part of a language. You already have a bit more than an elementary level if you're able to write a comment like this one. My first suggestion would be a British Council class, but if that's not possible I would suggest you begin with Elementary Podcasts Series 3 Episode 1. Spend some time working through it -- there is advice on how to do this on our Frequently asked questions page -- doing the exercises, looking up and writing down new vocabulary, practising your pronunciation, and then move on to Episode 2. This kind of study has helped many of our users -- see, for example, what Julie To said.

But if you insist on studying grammar, then I would recommend starting with Nouns, Pronouns and Verbs, but don't work through every page in sequence. This section isn't designed as a reference, in other words, as a place you look for answers, not as a course or place where you begin on the first page and continue from there. That is why I can't really recommend any particular page.

I hope this helps you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

 

Submitted by MCWSL on Mon, 10/04/2017 - 16:00

Permalink
Hello, Can we use a singular object after a plural pronoun and vice versa? Does it have some kind of particular meaning? For example, John asked Mark, ''How many dogs do you have?'' and added, ''Is/are it four dogs?'' ''We laughed like a stupid person/ like stupid people'' Thank you.

Submitted by Peter M. on Tue, 11/04/2017 - 06:46

In reply to by MCWSL

Permalink

Hello MCWSL,

Yes, it is quite common to do this. In fact, in many cases it is the only possibility. 

in your first example it would be incorrect to use 'are'. The 'it' here refers really to the fact, not the dogs. Effectively it means 'Is the answer four dogs?'

In your second sentence both singular and plural are possible. It really depends whether you are thinking of the group as a whole or as individuals.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Ellenna on Wed, 05/04/2017 - 09:44

Permalink
Hi. The following sentence is about students' absenteeism: "This has resulted in a 15 percent lower attendance rate." - Can I use "level" or "incidence" instead of rate here? Are the words "rate", "level" and "incidence" interchangebale?

Hi Ellenna,

I think 'attendance rate' is the most common collocation here, but you can also fine 'attendance level' used. 'Incidence' tends to be used a little diferently, usually in the phrase 'incidence of [something]'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by KevinIther on Wed, 05/04/2017 - 08:05

Permalink
I like turtle. :D

Submitted by Prashantv3 on Fri, 24/03/2017 - 08:18

Permalink
hi how to start english speaking

Submitted by Kirk on Fri, 24/03/2017 - 15:40

In reply to by Prashantv3

Permalink

Hello Prashantv3,

You can find some advice on how to use LearnEnglish to improve your speaking on our Frequently asked questions page. That's where I'd recommend you start.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by enrique19 on Tue, 28/02/2017 - 23:23

Permalink
Good Day! Anybody check my grammar? He was angry to everybody and everything who caused his defeat.

Hello enrique19,

You need to change the preposition here. We do not say 'angry to' but rather 'angry with'. The rest of the sentence is fine.

Please note that we do not usually check sentences or texts for users in this way. In the comments sections we are happy to explain issues arising from our own materials or to explain questions about how the language works, but we generally do not offer a correct or checking service.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by lasitha on Tue, 28/02/2017 - 01:26

Permalink
This is a good opportunity to all of us to enhance our knowledge.