Future continuous and future perfect

Do you know how to use phrases like I'll be studying or I'll have finished?

Look at these examples to see how the future continuous and future perfect are used.

In three years' time, I'll be studying medicine.
In five years' time, I'll have finished studying medicine.

Try this exercise to test your grammar.

Grammar test 1

Future continuous and future perfect: Grammar test 1

Read the explanation to learn more.

Grammar explanation

Future continuous

We can use the future continuous (will/won't be + -ing form) to talk about future actions that: 

  • will be in progress at a specific time in the future:

When you come out of school tomorrow, I'll be boarding a plane.
Try to call before 8 o'clock. After that, we'll be watching the match.
You can visit us during the first week of July. I won't be working then.

  • we see as new, different or temporary:

Today we're taking the bus but next week we'll be taking the train.
He'll be staying with his parents for several months while his father is in recovery.
Will you be starting work earlier with your new job?

Future perfect

We use the future perfect simple (will/won't have + past participle) to talk about something that will be completed before a specific time in the future.

The guests are coming at 8 p.m. I'll have finished cooking by then.
On 9 October we'll have been married for 50 years.
Will you have gone to bed when I get back?

We can use phrases like by or by the time (meaning 'at some point before') and in or in a day's time / in two months' time / in five years' time etc. (meaning 'at the end of this period') to give the time period in which the action will be completed.

I won't have written all the reports by next week.
By the time we arrive, the kids will have gone to bed.
I'll have finished in an hour and then we can watch a film.
In three years' time, I'll have graduated from university.

Do this exercise to test your grammar again.

Grammar test 2

Future continuous and future perfect: Grammar test 2

Language level

Intermediate: B1
Upper intermediate: B2

Submitted by GiulianaAndy on Sun, 01/08/2021 - 02:53

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Hello, thank you for the lesson. Excuse me, I have a couple of questions. They are about these 2 sentences: -You can visit us during the first week of July. I won't be working then. What does "then" mean in that sentence? Is it related to the future continuous tense? - The guests are coming at 8 p.m. I'll have finished cooking by then. What does "by then" mean in that sentence? Is it related to the future perfect tense? Thank you very much

Hi GiulianaAndy,

In these sentences, then means 'that time' or 'at that time'. It refers to a time that was mentioned earlier in the conversation ('the first week of July' / '8 p.m.'). So, the speaker doesn't need to repeat that information.

No, it's not directly required by these particular tenses. But more generally, these tenses are often used with references to a specific future time (using then or other words) to make their meaning clear.

Have a look at this Cambridge Dictionary page for more examples. I hope it helps!

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by DaniWeebKage on Sun, 18/07/2021 - 13:53

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Dear Team, 1) I am changing my internet supplier tonight so I might not get your email until tomorrow. 2) I will be changing my internet supplier tonight so I might not get your email until tomorrow. Which Tense is correct? And why?

Hello DaniWeebKage,

Both are correct. We use the present continuous to speak about arranged future plans (such as appointments) and the future continuous can be used to speak about what will be happening at a point of time in the future.

In the situation that I suppose you are imagining with these sentences, I can't think of any reason for using one versus the other. But in other situations, you might say 'I'm changing my ISP tonight' to say, for example, that you can't go to the cinema with someone. This is a context where you're speaking of scheduling, i.e. future arrangements.

You might say 'I'll be changing my ISP tonight' when, for example, someone comments on what they'll be doing tonight, e.g. watching an important rugby match.

But this is not to say that the other response would be impossible in these situations.

Hope this helps.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Timothy555 on Sat, 12/06/2021 - 12:00

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Hello, referring to your example above for future continuous tense, your article mentioned "When you come out of school tomorrow, I'll be boarding a plane" as an example of the use of the future continuous tense for actions that will be in progress at a specific time in the future. Am I right to say that "When you come out of school" refers to a future action which serves as a time marker (i.e. a specific time in the future), and "I'll be boarding a plane" refers to a longer action in the future which will be in progress at a specific future time represented by the action of "coming out of school" (so this means that the longer action of boarding the plane started anytime before the action of "coming out of school occurred", and continued after the action of "coming out of school" occurred). Is my understanding correct? Thanks.

Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Mon, 12/04/2021 - 05:03

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Hello team. Could you please tell me which form is correct? Why? 1- In five years' time, many projects will be carried out. 2- In five years' time, many projects will have been carried out. Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

In 1, the projects won't necessarily be finished in five years' time. In 2, the projects will have already been finished by then.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Maahir on Thu, 08/04/2021 - 07:57

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Hi Sir, I am wondering the difference between the Future continues and the P continues with going to. for example I am going to buy a new car by next month or I will be buying a new car by next month. if I ma not wrong we use both "going to and Future Continues" to talk about future plans so, my question is what is the difference between the two tenses and which one we use to where? Thanks in advance.

Submitted by Jonathan R on Fri, 09/04/2021 - 11:41

In reply to by Maahir

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Hi Maahir,

Both going to and the future continuous show plans, but the future continuous shows a higher degree of certainty. If you say I will be buying a new car, it shows that you are very sure that this will actually happen. If you say I am going to buy a new car, it doesn't show such certainty. Buying a new car may be just your dream or intention.

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Jack Red on Sun, 21/03/2021 - 10:05

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Hi, I looked at Cambridge's grammar book and it is written that future simple is used for the things that will definetly happen and we cannot control. Example: Jill will be 2 years old next month. The colour of the moon will turn into red tomorrow night. Also, it is written that future continuous is used for the things that will defiently happen as a consequence of a routine or arrangement. Example: He will be working as a lifeguard in the summer. Don't ask him. I'll be seeing him anyway in the meeting. These 2 are too similar and confusing. For example, there is a question in my grammar book. It is like this: I ... turn 20 in 2 weeks' time. A)will turn B)will be turning. I thought that either one could be used but the answer is B. I could not understand why. Can you explain it tome please?

Submitted by Peter M. on Mon, 22/03/2021 - 06:55

In reply to by Jack Red

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Hello Jack Red,

You are right that both forms (will turn and will be turning) are correct here.

 

I think the explanations you quote are only examples of uses, not the only uses possible. It's quite possible to use will + verb to describe choices (things we control), for example, as well as things we do not control. It's also quite possible to use will be + verbing to describe things that we expect (in the present as well as the future) as part of a normal and predictable process.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Zuzanna on Thu, 11/02/2021 - 10:10

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Dear Sir, In my book is a sentence: " We also use will be-ing to talk about complete actions in the future." Could you explain to me what ''complete actions'' mean? Can I use Future Continuous to talk about what will be finished in the future? I thought we use Future Simple then. Please help me. Best regards, Zuzanna

Hello Zuzanna,

I'm afraid I can't think of an example for that usage off the top of my head -- that sounds strange to me. Sorry!

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Teresa R. on Tue, 09/02/2021 - 10:12

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Hi. I have a question about this sentence: “I’ve never felt more invisible than when I’m traveling with her. She’ll be wearing a neon Gucci sweatsuit and a pair of white pumps”. Is “She’ll be wearing” future continuous, even if the action described is not in the future, but it’s something that the person that the speaker knows usually does?

Submitted by Kirk on Tue, 09/02/2021 - 14:21

In reply to by Teresa R.

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Hello Paula81,

I'd need to see the full context for these sentences to be able to explain the future continuous form here with full confidence, but I expect that 'will' is being used to talk about typical behaviour here. It sounds as if the writer is thinking of what typically happens when he or she travels with this person.

This is an advanced use of 'will' that is analogous to the use of 'would' to speak about typical past behaviour. You can see a short explanation of this use of 'will' under the section Habitual events on this Cambridge Dictionary page; there's an explanation of this use of 'would' on our Talking about the past page, under Past events and situations.

Hope this helps you make sense of it -- it's great that you noticed it!

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by SaraZaber on Mon, 08/02/2021 - 12:24

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Which sentence is correct? The revision of Mid Term Exam will be started on Monday. Or The revision of Mid Term Exam will be starting(will start)on Monday. I want to tell the students that their revision is going to start from Monday, in this case which of the above two sentences are correct?

Hello SaraZaber,

You could use either of the sentences, but I'd recommend the second one. If you use the passive voice (first sentence), it suggests the revision is more mechanical, as if it were something that will happen whether or not the students participate. The second one doesn't have this same sense.

It's a subtle difference and up to you which is better. You could also make it even more active by saying 'We will begin the revision for the mid-term exam on Monday'.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

When given as a 'Notice' shall I still use the first sentence? (will be started)

Hello again SaraZaber,

I would use the second one. The first one is grammatically correct, but sounds more formal than any situation I've ever taught in. But if you think the first one is more appropriate for your context, that might be a better choice.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Htoo Sandi Soe Moe on Fri, 15/01/2021 - 18:01

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Sir, 1. I am going to study for Master degree this year. 2. I will be studying for Master degree this year. Which one is correct? Please explain me. Is it correct using Master degree?

Submitted by Peter M. on Sun, 17/01/2021 - 08:40

In reply to by Htoo Sandi Soe Moe

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Hello Htoo Sandi Soe Moe,

Both are possible. The first version (with going to) suggests that this is your plan or intention but may change. The second version (with will be studying) suggests that the situation is certain and no longer just a plan or a hope.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Ayn on Tue, 08/12/2020 - 06:14

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Hello! Which one is correct? A)I will turn 20 in 2 weeks' time. B)I am turning 20 in 2 weeks' time. C)I am gonna turn 20 in 2 weeks' time. D)I will be turning 20 in 2 weeks' time. I think the answer is A, because we use future simple for the things which will definetly happen and we cannot control, but the answer is D. I am confused.Can you help please?

Submitted by Peter M. on Tue, 08/12/2020 - 08:30

In reply to by Ayn

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Hello Ayn,

All of those sentences are correct. Future forms are often a matter of choice: how the speaker sees the action and what the speaker chooses to emphasise. Without any context to indicate this, you could use any of these forms and none of them are impossible.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Can you explain how D is possible please?

Hello again Ayn,

We often use [will be + verb-ing] to talk about things that occur as part of the normal course of events. This form signals that we expect something to happen and see it as normal and unsurprising.

 

You can read more about future forms on this page:

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar-reference/talking-about-the-future

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks sir, but I think we can use future simple for the things which will definetly happen and not surprising, can't we? In the grammar book I have been looking for, it was written that we use future simple for the things which will definetly happen and we cannot control.

Hello again Ayn,

Yes, we can. As I said, future forms are often a matter of choice. The speaker can choose from several possibilities, depending on the context and the speaker's intention. In some contexts there may be a difference in meaning but in others only a difference in emphasis. This is why context is so important and why exercises which do not provide a context are often not very helpful.

 

For example:

I'll have dinner at 4.00.

I'll be having dinner at 4.00.

Here there is a difference. In the first sentence, the meal starts at 4.00. In the second sentence the meal will be in progress at 4.00 and will start earlier than this.

 

I will turn 20 in two weeks.

I'll be turning 20 in two weeks.

Here the only difference is one of style and emphasis.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Jaiime_edg on Wed, 18/11/2020 - 14:51

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Is this rewrite correct? Peter’s class starts at 7. At 7.30 Peter will have started the class. Or should it be By 7.30?

Hello Jaiime_edg,

Both versions of the sentence (with 'At' and 'By') are grammatically correct, though 'by' is probably better here. I'd recommend something like 'Class will have started by 7.30'. This doesn't communicate exactly the same information as the original sentence, but it's pretty close.

Hope this helps.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Jaiime_edg on Wed, 18/11/2020 - 14:50

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Hello this tests are very good because I am of de calle

Submitted by David7417 on Tue, 17/11/2020 - 19:16

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Hello, I have troubles understanding in which situations should I use following sentences. I am reading a book tomorrow. I will be reading a book tomorrow. I am going to be reading a book tomorrow.

Hello David7417,

It's difficult to explain these sorts of differences without a specific context or the speaker's intentions, but maybe this will help. The first and third sentences could be used to indicate that you plan to read a book tomorrow. The first one makes it sound as if you have a very firm plan that will not change; the third one is less firm, but clearly states your intention to read the book.

The second one could be used in many different contexts, but in general it shows that you're thinking about tomorrow as a period of time in which you'll be reading. It could be that you planned to be reading (as in the first and third sentences) and someone asks you if you'll join them for lunch as usual, but you say that you can't because you'll be reading a book tomorrow.

But there are many other possible situations in which you could use a continuous form. I'd suggest you pay attention for this form as you read and listen to texts in English so that you can analyse how it's used.

Hope this helps.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by mikel on Sat, 07/11/2020 - 15:48

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Is this rewrite correct? Peter’s class starts at 7. At 7.30 Peter will have started the class. Or should it be By 7.30?

Hello mikel,

Both at and by are possible here.

In both sentences you are looking back and speculating about a past event.

If you say at then you are suggesting that the class began at 7.30 and are looking back from a later point (7.45, 8.00 etc).

If you say by then you are saying that the class started before this time, but you do not know exactly when.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Sokhom on Thu, 15/10/2020 - 18:39

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Hello, Sir I was wondering if the sentences are correct: '- This building will have been finishing next month.' '- This building will have finished by next month.' Thank you.

Hi Sokhom,

No, we need to change to This building will have been finished by next month. It's the passive voice in the future perfect (will have been + past participle).

It needs the passive because the verb finish refers to 'building work', which needs either a personal subject (e.g. The builders will have finished the building by next month) or to be in the passive (e.g. This building will have been finished).

Does that make sense?

Best wishes,

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Via on Thu, 15/10/2020 - 04:24

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Hello, I'm confused about how to use "be" and "have". In grammar test 2: 7. Let's call Rory. He'll be arrived by now. (This is my answer but it's incorrect.) Why can't I use the word "be" in the previous sentence? Thanks a lot

Submitted by Jonathan R on Sun, 18/10/2020 - 05:12

In reply to by Via

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Hi Via,

Good question! Be doesn't work here because be arrived is a passive structure (be + past participle). The passive doesn't make sense with arrived - we can't say, for example, Rory was arrived by (someone)

This sentence needs the future perfect. Although the time reference refers to the time up to the present (by now), not the time up to a future time, we also use will to show our beliefs about the present (see more examples here). That's why have is the answer here.

Does that make sense?

Best wishes,

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Via on Sun, 18/10/2020 - 22:29

In reply to by Jonathan R

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Yes, it make sense. Thank you.

Submitted by Tshewang Rinzin on Tue, 06/10/2020 - 02:21

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I have poor in garmmer

Hi Tshewang Rinzin,

Don't worry! Everyone here is here to learn and improve. If this page is too difficult, you can try lower level grammar here.

Best wishes,

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by samira_kitten on Thu, 01/10/2020 - 11:18

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hello could you please explain the differences between in ten years' time vs in the next ten years? which one is the exact time in the future? thanks

Submitted by Peter M. on Fri, 02/10/2020 - 08:04

In reply to by samira_kitten

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Hello samira_kitten,

In ten years' time denotes a precise time in the future: ten years from now (the moment of speaking).

In the next ten years is less precise. It means any time within the next ten years, so it could be in an hour or in nine years and eleven months.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Lakshmi94216 on Tue, 18/08/2020 - 09:33

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The show has lost traction with views and will not be returning for another season. Could I say "will not return? Thanks so much.

Submitted by AsahiYo20 on Tue, 04/08/2020 - 18:29

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I would like to ask why the future continuous tense is used in the following sentence. Could I use the simple future tense instead? "Some very attractive properties will be coming onto the market next month."
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