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Future continuous and future perfect

Do you know how to use phrases like I'll be studying or I'll have finished?

Look at these examples to see how the future continuous and future perfect are used.

In three years' time, I'll be studying medicine.
In five years' time, I'll have finished studying medicine.

Try this exercise to test your grammar.

Grammar test 1

Future continuous and future perfect: Grammar test 1

Read the explanation to learn more.

Grammar explanation

Future continuous

We can use the future continuous (will/won't be + -ing form) to talk about future actions that: 

  • will be in progress at a specific time in the future:

When you come out of school tomorrow, I'll be boarding a plane.
Try to call before 8 o'clock. After that, we'll be watching the match.
You can visit us during the first week of July. I won't be working then.

  • we see as new, different or temporary:

Today we're taking the bus but next week we'll be taking the train.
He'll be staying with his parents for several months while his father is in recovery.
Will you be starting work earlier with your new job?

Future perfect

We use the future perfect simple (will/won't have + past participle) to talk about something that will be completed before a specific time in the future.

The guests are coming at 8 p.m. I'll have finished cooking by then.
On 9 October we'll have been married for 50 years.
Will you have gone to bed when I get back?

We can use phrases like by or by the time (meaning 'at some point before') and in or in a day's time / in two months' time / in five years' time etc. (meaning 'at the end of this period') to give the time period in which the action will be completed.

I won't have written all the reports by next week.
By the time we arrive, the kids will have gone to bed.
I'll have finished in an hour and then we can watch a film.
In three years' time, I'll have graduated from university.

Do this exercise to test your grammar again.

Grammar test 2

Future continuous and future perfect: Grammar test 2

Language level

Intermediate: B1
Upper intermediate: B2

Comments

hello everyone,

I would like to know, where i can get tenses in this site, like present, past, future...

Hi karunesh,

The Verbs section of our Grammar Reference has a lot of pages on different verb forms. See the English Grammar box on the top right of the page and click on the links you're interested in there.

I hope this helps you.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello again,

Firstly, I want to thank you for your answer.
And secondly I want to ask you what is the correct form: 'adviser' or 'advisor'? I know they mean the same thing but still I have a doubt when I can use a specific form.

Thank you in advance,
Raluca

Hello Raluca,

Both versions are acceptable spellings and can be used interchangeably.  I have seen it suggested that 'advisor' is more common when it is an official title, whereas 'adviser' has a more general meaning of anyone who gives advice at a given moment, but certainly neither is wrong in either case.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello everyone!

I’m a new member of your team and I need guidance on this particular case - what is the correct form of:

In 5 years time I’ll have finished university and I’ll be able to earn some money at last.
In 5 year's time I’ll have finished university and I’ll be able to earn some money at last.

I mean: with or without apostrophe in the expression "years time".

Have a nice day / evening!
Raluca

Hello Raluca,

The correct form here is with an apostrophe, but since years is plural, the apostrophe goes after the s: "in five years' time". By the way, "in five years" is another way of saying the same thing.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Does the form "will + be + past participle" exist in the future? For example:

It will be finished in an hour if you will help me or It will be finished in an hour if you want to help me

Thanks

Hello MayelaM,

Yes, that form exists.  It is a passive form:

I will cook the dinner. [active]

The dinner will be cooked. [passive]

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks for your answer, just to clarify the structure of the passive voice in this question...

Are the both sentences on my question grammatically correct? In other words, can I use present or future in the second part of the sentence (after the if)?

It will be finished in an hour if you will help me

or

It will be finished in an hour if you want to help me

Thanks!

Hi Mayela,

In future time clauses that begin with if, when (and other words), the verb typically goes in the present simple form. So in the first sentence, it should be "if you help me"; the second sentence is fine.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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