You are here

Making a decision

Listen to a meeting in which colleagues make a decision to practise and improve your listening skills.

Do the preparation task first. Then listen to the audio and do the exercises.

Transcripts

Jani: Thanks for coming, everyone. So, we're here today to define the timeline for our new project.

Emiko: Yes, Jani, that's a great idea.

Carolina: OK. What do you need from us?

Emiko: Hold on a moment. I think we need to decide between us what to do, to make sure it works for all departments.

Jani: Yes, exactly, don't worry. We're going to discuss this and make a decision together. Let's first think about the scheduling of each project phase. What do you think, Emiko?

David: Can I interrupt? I think we should first be clear about the process we'll use to make the decision. How are we going to do it?

Jani: Ah, yes. Good point. Well, I think the best way is for each of you to give your opinion and then we can discuss and make a decision.

David: OK. That sounds good.

Emiko: Yes, that works for me too. I know we're still planning the structure of the later phases of the project, but I think we should begin phase one as soon as possible. We can work out the rest later, as we go along.

David: I'm sorry, I don't think so. How can we start phase one if we're not fully clear on where the rest of the project will take us? We might make a wrong decision and waste time.

Jani: I agree with you on that point, David. However, we'll waste too much time if we wait until everything is planned before we actually start working on the project. I think we should take an agile approach.

David: Agile approach?

Jani: Well, it means that we start quickly and then adapt as we go along.

Emiko: That's right.

Jani: Carolina, you've been very quiet.

Carolina: Um … I'm sorry. I didn't want to interrupt. I'm listening … and thinking.

David: Do you agree we should get the plan right first, and then start with phase one?

Carolina: I'm sorry, David. I don't think I agree with you. It's important to have a good plan. But plans can change, even the good ones – and business changes often. We need to be flexible, and we also need to move quickly.

Jani: OK. So should we take a vote?

Emiko: Well, you're the project leader. Let's go with your decision.

Carolina: Yes, I'll follow your lead, Jani.

David: Well, I guess that's decided then. We'll follow your agile approach, Jani. Start quickly and keep planning the later stages of the project.

Jani: Yes, that's right.

David: I still don't think this is the right decision, but I'm happy to go with the majority. We should add some space into the schedule later for additional work this 'flexibility' will need.

Jani: Don't worry, David, we will. OK, so it's decided then. We'll start phase one as soon as possible, and in the background we'll continue planning the later phases and adapt them as we go along.

Discussion

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

In our university it completely depends on the objective of decision which we should make. For example, if we want to make schedule for next semester, the dean of faculty and his/her assistant console with professors and assistant professors and then make schedule. Making schedule of mid term tests and so on are the same as scheduling for semesters. But it differs for each professor. Everyone has three kinds of programs which are named daily, monthly, and semestrial. Professors make these schedules based on the subject of his/her course and the statutes of university.
If I compare them to process which is discussed above, they are probably very different. For example, course policy should be made at the beginning of each semester. Therefore, I think we usually make structured decisions which is stated by David, and we slightly use agile planing.
Regards,
Tayyebi

In the office where I work, we usually share our perspective or opinion about a specific topic, listening to all the perspectives and in the end, our boss makes a final decision with the best opinions or perspectives that we already gave in the discussion.

In my workplace, all decisions made by our department supervisors however they will ask and collect our opinions first, and then they will get approval from our manager, eventually, we will have a briefing of the action or decisions that they made to let us know.

I prefer to stay neutral

In my Job, decissions are very centered on few people, because in the public sector, there are a lot of reviews for each project and budgets.

My coordinator asks our opinion and decides alone what to do.

Hi!

Emiko says: "we need to decide between us", but the correct way would be "among us". Am I wrong?

Thank you

Hi rerre,

In this context youl could use between us, among us or amongst us. All are correct and there is no difference in meaning.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Where I work decisions are made by the top management and then communicated to employees.

There are three forms:

1. After of analysed a research.
2. Based us in previous experiences.
3. Taking in count development of process.

Pages