Adverbials

Adverbials are words that we use to give more information about a verb. They can be one word (angrily, here) or phrases (at home, in a few hours) and often say how, where, when or how often something happens or is done, though they can also have other uses.

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how adverbials are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Hello amol,

The superlative usually has a definite article before it unless there is a possessive adjective (my/your etc).

There are some cases in which the article is optional and some in which it should not be used.

When the superlative comes before a noun, the article is needed:

He is the best player.

not

He is best player.

 

When a superlative adjective is in the predicative position, meaning it comes after rather than before the noun and follows a verb, it can be omitted, especially in informal use:

Dark chocolate is the best.

or

Dark chocolate is best.

 

The same is true of superlative adverbs:

He worked the hardest.

or

He worked hardest.

 

When the superlative is in the predicative position and you are compare the same thing in different situations you should not use an article:

He works hardest in the morning when he is fresh.

not

He works the hardest in the morning when he is fresh.

 

I hope that helps to clarify it for you.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

amol 提交于 周六, 15/09/2018 - 06:29

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Should we use much or very as an adverb of degree to describe V3 used as a verb? Q. The police was much / very criticised.

Hello amol,

We would use 'very' in this sentence.

We use 'much' to modify verbs in negatives and questions, so you could say these:

Were the police criticised much?

I don't think the police were criticised much.

'Much' usually comes after the verb rather than before it.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

amol 提交于 周六, 15/09/2018 - 06:21

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Which adverb (much/very) is to be used when V3 is used as an adjective? 1. He is very / much satisfied. 2. I felt very / much tired.

Hello amol,

The correct word here is 'very'. We use 'much' to modify comparative adjectives (much bigger, much more beautiful) but not to modify adjectives.

 

There are two exceptions is in a certain type of informal/slang question:

Person A yawns.

Person B: Tired much?

 

As I said, this is a non-standard use.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Nisala Jayasuriya 提交于 周三, 12/09/2018 - 07:00

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Hi Kirk Actually I was busy with lots of things happening around me Actually I was busy with lots of things were happening around me Which one is correct

Hi Nisala Jayasuriya,

The first sentence is correct; the second is not.

 

The first sentence uses the -ing form as part of a participle clause. You can read more about these on this page.

 

The second sentence is not correct. You could add a relative pronoun ('which' or 'that'):

Actually I was busy with lots of things which were happening around me

Alternatively you could have two sentences:

Actually I was busy. Lots of things were happening around me.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Nisala Jayasuriya 提交于 周二, 11/09/2018 - 11:47

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Two players got injured while feilding on muddy surface Is this statement correct

Hi Nisala,

That works, though please note that 'fielding' is misspelt and that some kind of article (either 'a' or 'the') should be used before 'muddy surface'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Goncharush 提交于 周四, 09/08/2018 - 15:16

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Hi, What is the correct way to use *last* in this sentence? 1.The police are seaching for Liza Morgan. She was last seen on Monday, 22 July. Or 2. The police are seaching for Liza Morgan. Last time, she was seen on Monday, 22 July.

Peter M. 提交于 周五, 10/08/2018 - 07:13

Goncharush 回复

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Hi Goncharush,

The first sentence is correct and is the best option stylistically, in my view.

If you wanted to use 'last time' then you could say:

The police are seaching for Liza Morgan. The last time she was seen was on Monday, 22 July.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

amol 提交于 周五, 13/07/2018 - 07:49

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Hello, 'much',as an adverb, is used with past participle The sentence - "She is very tired after a day's work." Is the above sentence correct? Can we use much instead of very?

Hello amol,

Much as an adverb is most often used before comparative adjectives: much better, much easier.

It can be used with superlative adjectives: much the best, much the easiest.

With past participles it is used quite rarely. It tends to be seen in more formal texts and usually only in certain expresssions: much loved, much needed, much changed. It cannot be used in place of very in most expressions.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

David240350 提交于 周一, 09/07/2018 - 17:21

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Can you tell me which is correct? I've just woke up I've just woken up thanks

Hi David,

The second one is correct. If you changed the first one to 'I just woke up', it would be correct, though more natural in American English than in British English.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

sujit kumar 提交于 周四, 05/07/2018 - 13:24

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hello Sir, can you help me to clear my doubt how to use might have/could have.. I might have been hit by a car, but luckily I just managed to get out of the way. I could have been hit by a car, but luckily I just managed to get out of the way. Which one is right w.r.t might have/could have.

Hi sujit kumar,

'might have' and 'could have' can both be used to talk about a possible action in the past with little or no difference in meaning. Your sentence is well-formed grammatically, but I wouldn't recommend saying 'might have' or 'could have' here because the last part ('luckily I just managed to get out of the way') shows that you were nearly hit. In other words, 'might have' and 'could have' suggest that it was possible in a theoretical way, whereas the last part of your sentence that it wasn't just theoretical -- it nearly happened.

What I'd recommend instead is something like 'I was nearly hit by a car, but luckily I just managed to get out of the way' or 'I might have been hit by a car but luckily was not'.

I hope this helps you make sense of it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Sir This question is under puntuation. Can we use a full stop after a phrase e.g. Oh good. where did you find it? There is a full stop after 'good'. Is it all right? Regards Thank you.

Hello Lal,

Yes, it is perfectly fine to use a full stop. An exclamation mark (!) would also be fine if you wanted to indicate surprise or a very strong reaction, or to show sarcasm.

Don't forget to ise a capital letter after the full stop.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Sir Please let me know either both or only one is correct. then which one. e.g He quietly shut the door. He shut the door quietly.. Thank you. Rrgards

Hi Lal,

The second one is much more common than the first and is the sentence I would recommend you use. The first one is not exactly wrong, but would only be used in some kind of specific context.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Ahmed Imam 提交于 周六, 02/06/2018 - 23:18

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I am confused about the use of "most" or "the most". Is it correct to say " I love all people but I love my parents most." or ".....the most" and why? Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

You can use either 'most' or 'the most' as adverbs. Both are correct and there is no difference in meaning.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, there is a rule that one should use 'the' before superlatives, and as 'most' is a superlative, we should use 'the' before it, isn't it? Would I be grammatically correct if we write just 'most'.

Hello ali shah,

'most' is a very common word that is used not only in superlative constructions, but also, for example, as a quantifier, so it really depends on the particular sentence and the speaker's meaning. If you have a question about a specific sentence, please feel free to ask us about it, though please also tell us how you understand it to be correct or incorrect.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

SonuKumar 提交于 周五, 27/04/2018 - 11:06

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Sir, We'll give our listeners a choice of two songs to get one of them played on the radio by us and they'll decide (choose) as to which song to be played. Two more sentences In this regard. Could you please tell me as to what songs you have played so far on the radio. I have no explanation about 'as to' How and why they did it. Now this question is, Can we drop the preposition 'as to', is it even necessary to use it here if not, then why, where are we supposed to use 'as to' or 'about' exactly ?

Hi SonuKumar,

I wouldn't use 'as to' in any of the sentences you ask about. If you remove 'as to', they are both correct, though the first one needs the word 'is' before 'to be played' to be grammatical.

'as to' means something like 'regarding', but is fairly rare, especially in contexts that are not formal. It doesn't seem natural to me to use it in either of the contexts these sentences suggest, so I'd be hard pressed to explain why someone used them there.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

whitekrystal 提交于 周五, 30/03/2018 - 19:49

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'At the Learn English or on the Learn English', I know both prepositions 'at' and 'on' are used, but I'm just wondering why the speaket uses 'at' and why use 'on'? So that I get the point/reason. For example. Articles at the Learn English are very helpful. Articles on the Learn English are very helpful. At Wikipedia or on Wikipedia

Hi whitekrystal,

I'm afraid I couldn't find the sentence that you are referring to. In any case, I'm not sure I could have explained the usage of 'at' or 'on', as both can be used in some cases. In general, I think people speak of content being 'on' a website and of performing actions 'at' websites, though I doubt you will find much consistency here.

I would say 'The articles on LearnEnglish are helpful'. As for the Wikipedia, honestly I'd probably say 'Wikipedia articles are useful', but if I had to say it another way, I'd probably say 'on the Wikipedia'.

I'm sorry I can't give you a firmer answer. As far as I know, there is quite a bit of variation here.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Good evening! I wanted to know if the following sentence is grammatically correct . "As he is rich, he is not happy." Thanks!

Hello Prap,

Yes, it is grammatically correct. In cases like this, though, we tend to use 'because' instead of 'as', unless it is formal writing. 'He is not happy because he is rich' or 'The reason his is not happy is because he is rich' are other more natural-sounding alternatives.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Marua 提交于 周二, 20/03/2018 - 10:03

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Hi. If I remember correctly, we can use simple or continuous aspect after 'as'. But are these correct sentences? 1. Just as he raised his harpoon, silence broke. 2. As he ran towards the children, he slipped. Thank you.

Hello Marua,

Yes, that is correct -- both aspects are possible and the verb forms you use after 'as' in these two sentences are correct. 'silence broke' isn't clear to me, though; perhaps 'the silence was broken'?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Teachers, Could you kindly tell me which of the following sentences is correct with explanation: 1. I am very disappointed/tired. 2. I am very much disappointed/tired. 3. I am much disappointed/tired. 4. I am much too disappointed/tired. 5. I am too much disappointed/tired.

Hello souba73,

The first one is the correct one. We're happy to help you understand this, but please tell us why you think the others may not be correct and we'll correct you as needed.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

viettungvuong 提交于 周五, 09/03/2018 - 13:10

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Is this phrase gramatically correct? "Although Chirstmas season is in summer in Australia,..." "in Australia" is an adverbial of place, right?

Hello viettungvuong,

The sentence needs to be slightly changed:

Although Christmas is in the summer in Australia...

We generally just say 'Christmas' for the whole period as well as for just the day.

'In Australia' is an adverbial of place. You can read more about these on this page.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

nkmg 提交于 周五, 16/02/2018 - 21:03

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Hello team : can we use adverb to describe nouns I read this sentence in subtital of can programm (it's named for rabidly declining low system) why here rapidly not rapid

Hello nkmg,

The adverb 'rabidly' here does not describe a noun but an adjective: rabidly (adv) declining (adj).

Adverbs can describe pronouns but not nouns: absolutely everyone / hardly anyone / nearly all.

Certain adverbs can also function as adjectives, but they are not adverbs when used in this way: the very idea shocks me / at the very bottom of the sea.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Manishb 提交于 周六, 10/02/2018 - 06:23

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Hello, A restaurant on the top of the building. A restaurant at the top of the building. Which one is correct? Thanks!

Hello Manishb,

'At' has a more general meaning than 'on'. When we say 'at the top of the building' we might mean anything from the top floor or two to the actual roof, while 'on the top of the building' would be used when something is literally standing on the roof.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Emerson Marque… 提交于 周日, 14/01/2018 - 00:08

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Kirk; How can I get a plan of study?

Peter M. 提交于 周日, 14/01/2018 - 09:50

Emerson Marque… 回复

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Hello Emerson,

LearnEnglish is not a course in the conventional sense so we do not have plans of study for our users. Instead, the site functions as an open-access organised collection of materials for guided self-study. You can search for materials by level, topic or language structure and organise your own study.

For more information on how to use LearnEnglish please visit our Getting Started section.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Ali boroki 提交于 周二, 19/12/2017 - 08:08

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Hi dear teachers. This is Ali from Iran,first of all i would say thank you for your amazing website ,i really like it. I have question from you,how can i improve my konwing in vocabulary,i mean difficult vocab and difficult synonym,no just simple words. Best wish Ali.

Hello again Ali boroki,

I'm very glad you're finding LearnEnglish useful, and we appreciate you letting us know. I would recommend you follow the advice on improving your vocabulary in our Frequently asked questions.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Meeja 提交于 周三, 06/12/2017 - 04:25

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Noted Maam, Lacking transmittal letter for us to received the above submission. Please be guided accordingly. Thank you.( PLS HELP ME UNDERSTAND THE CONTEXT. IS SUBMISSION OK OR NOT?)

Hello Meeja,

I'm afraid I don't understand this message very well. Perhaps with context I could make more sense of it, but without knowing what it refers to it's difficult to say much more than that it seems to communicate that a 'transmittal letter' that was expected did not arrive.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

JamlMakav 提交于 周日, 12/11/2017 - 20:29

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Hello, ''Doctors in that city only check you up on Fridays'' vs ''Doctors in that city only check you on Fridays'' What is the difference between these sentences when the adverb (up) is used? Thank you very much.

Hello JamlMakav,

At least in the varieties of English I'm familiar with, the first sentence is not idiomatic (i.e. not something people say). Please see the dictionary entries for 'check', 'check-up' and 'check up on sb' to see how these different forms are used.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team