Adverbials

Adverbials are words that we use to give more information about a verb. They can be one word (angrily, here) or phrases (at home, in a few hours) and often say how, where, when or how often something happens or is done, though they can also have other uses.

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how adverbials are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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naghmairam 提交于 周三, 18/01/2017 - 05:23

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Hi, I often get confused between adverb of place and preposition of place. Like in the following sentence The car was parked in front of the house. I want to know whether 'in front of' here is preposition or adverb of place. How can we differentiate whether a word is preposition of place or adverb of place? Thanks.

Kirk 提交于 周三, 18/01/2017 - 13:01

naghmairam 回复

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Hello naghmairam,

One simple test to determine whether it's a preposition or adverb is to consider whether the word in question has an object (usually a noun phrase). If it does, then it's a preposition, as prepositions must have an object. Adverbs do not - instead, they modify a verb, adjective or other adverb.

In the sentence you ask about, 'the house' is the object of 'in front of', so it's a preposition here. 

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

pumbi 提交于 周五, 30/12/2016 - 01:07

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Hi Sir; I asked the same question under verb topic. But my question is not related that topic. So I changed the page sir, For the reference, my previuos question link https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/verbs/present-tense/present-simple I want to say in English below sentences: Someone says -- I went to the bank. Then I want to tell that i did the same thing. A person : I went to the bank B person : me too Can I say "me too" as I also went to the bank ?. In this sentence, I don't refer the verb (went). I want to modify "I". How can I do that with "also". Thnks

Hello Hasipumba,

Yes, you could say 'me too', 'so did I' or even 'I did also' (if you really want to use 'also'); the first two forms are more common, as the third is a bit formal-sounding.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

taj25 提交于 周四, 22/12/2016 - 07:26

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i was tried or i have tried which one is grammatically correct

Hello taj25,

Both are correct, though they can mean different things. It depends on the context.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Guys, In the example I see: We met in London. (only "London" is bold) But when I do the exercises: My grandmother spent the first sixteen years of her life in India. (where "in India" is marked as the correct answer). Could you please explain that?

Hello Jarek_O,

There was an error in the explanation - 'in London' should all be in bold, i.e. 'in' is also part of the adverbial. I've now fixed this (though it make take a day for the change to appear on the page). Thank you very much for pointing this error out to us!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

blueishbox 提交于 周四, 17/11/2016 - 17:27

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Hi! I'd like to know if the following sentences are correct. 1. He was driving above the speed limit. 2. He was driving 10 kilometers over the speed limit. - because we use "over" with numbers I have seen "driving over the speed limit". Is this correct? Is it because a limit implies a number? Thank you for your help.

Peter M. 提交于 周五, 18/11/2016 - 06:49

blueishbox 回复

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Hi blueishbox,

The standard form here is 'over' but not because of the number. We use 'over' because it collocates strongly with 'limit' (and the opposite would be 'under'). You can be under the age limit for a film, for example, or over the limit if you have drunk too much alcohol to drive.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

kisa zehra 提交于 周四, 10/11/2016 - 11:15

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respected sir, i wanna ask you the difference between the following sentences: 1)Dont forget me when eating your birthday cake. 2)Dont forget me while eating your birthday cake. tell me the difference between while and when please.

Hello kisa zehra,

In many cases, you can use both 'when' and 'while', though 'while' is better when talking about longer actions that happen simultaneously. There is a page at the BBC that explains this that I'd recommend to you. It would also be a good idea to look up both words in the Cambridge Dictionary. Studying the example sentences should also help clarify how they are used.

Finally, I just wanted to mention that using an -ing form after 'when' or 'while' is rather formal, whereas these sentences look as if they might be informal. So 'when/while you're eating' might be an alternative to consider.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

nkmg 提交于 周三, 09/11/2016 - 19:06

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Hello sir: I want know what the difference between adverb ( really) & ( very ) why we say it's really delicious not it very delicious Also, we say : really recommended not very recommended is there a rule ?

Hello nkmg,

You can find more on 'really' and 'very' on our Intensifiers and Adjectives (gradable/non-gradable) pages and also in the Cambridge Dictionary.

'delicious' is a strong adjective (see the Intensifiers page), which means that it already includes the idea of 'very' in it. This is why you can't use 'very' with it, but 'really' is OK.

Although you can find examples of 'very recommended' on the internet, you're right, in general, there are other intensifiers (such as 'highly' or 'strongly') that are much more common. These are collocations, the words that people tend to use with 'recommended'. It's always a good idea to look at the example sentences in dictionaries such as Oxford and Cambridge to see how they are used.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

ashok kumar0006 提交于 周二, 25/10/2016 - 16:27

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"A fire in an enclosed space burns with the aid of reflected radiation that preheats the fuel, making ignition much easier and flames spreading more quickly." Is this sentence is correct?

Hello ashok kumar0006,

Except for the last part ('... and flames spreading more quickly') it is. I'd suggest '... making ignition easier and the spread of flames quicker'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Diogo Diniz 提交于 周一, 24/10/2016 - 11:30

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I would like to know why in the phrase "I don’t know where the keys are but they’re not in the car for sure. I’ve looked!", used in the exercise 1, I can't tell that the expression "in the car" is a adverbial.

Hello Diogo Diniz,

You're absolutely right! I've fixed both Task 1 and Task 2 so that they are correct now. Thanks very much for point out this error to us.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

kisa zehra 提交于 周六, 01/10/2016 - 13:09

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Respected Sir, I found in many sentences the usage of "have had " or "has had" consecutively. Eg:- I have had a lot of homework this week. I don't know when to use such structure in a sentence ?

kisa zehra 提交于 周五, 30/09/2016 - 19:11

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Respected sir, I wanna ask you that is might used for future and past and May for present .The following sentence Who that might be? Who that may be? Is the second sentence is telling about present likewise ,in can and could i have confusions I refer to that page you suggest me but can you help me for this?

Hello kisa zehra,

Both 'might' and 'may' can be used to refer to present or future, depending on the context.

Note that when asking a question with these verbs we need to invert the subject and verb, so we say Who might that be? and not Who that might be?

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

kisa zehra 提交于 周五, 30/09/2016 - 18:50

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Okay, Sir Krik I got it and still if I find any misconception I'll ask you Thanx

kisa zehra 提交于 周五, 30/09/2016 - 07:00

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Respected Sir, I have a confusion in the usage of will,would,could,shall,can,may and might. I really tried to understand from different sources but I think you can teach me well please clear my concepts, Thanx

Hello kisa zehra,

Have you seen our modal verbs section? We're happy to help you, but I'm afraid you'll have to ask a much more specific question than that. You can see some guidelines on the kinds of questions we do and don't answer on our Frequently asked questions page.

We look forward to hearing from you again soon.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

chedD1t 提交于 周三, 31/08/2016 - 13:05

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Hello! I'd like to know more about the difference between the conjuctions "but" and "and".Where could I find it? Thank You!
Good dictionaries such as Cambridge Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary would help you out.

Hello chedD1t,

These are both co-ordinating conjunctions, but while 'and' is used to add additional information 'but' is used to show contrast. If there is a particular example you are interested in then we'll be happy to comment.

For more on co-ordinating and subordinating conjunctions see this page.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I mean the cases when both of the conjuctions act as contrast ones. E.g. I wanted him to listen to me BUT he wouldnt even give me the time. I wanted him to listen to me AND he wouldnt even give me the time.

Hello chedDt1,

I think the difference here is very subtle and the two conjunctions can be swapped without any great change in meaning. I would tentatively suggest that 'and' tends to be used when we are sharing information that is to some degree expected or in accordance with the speaker's expectations, while 'but' tends to be used with something which was unexpected to the speaker or surprising.

For example:

 

A - Bob's not very co-operative, is he?

B - No, he's not. You know, this morning I wanted him to listen to me and he wouldn't even give me the time.

 

A - Have you tried telling Bob?

B - I tried this morning. I wanted him to listen to me but he wouldn't even give me the time.

 

However, this is purely my impression; I have no linguistic data to back it up!

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Akhil 提交于 周三, 31/08/2016 - 03:03

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Please sir Explain me about adverbial how likely.

Hello Akhil,

That's a very general question and not really the kind of question which we can answer in the comments section because of length. If you can provide an example sentence, however, then we'll be happy to comment on it.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

kisa zehra 提交于 周四, 25/08/2016 - 05:21

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Respected teachers, I wanna ask you that the following sentence has correct structure or not ? The sentence is: "That was a sarcasm or your thanks has/have true meanings ? The confusion is here we use what has or have ? I always have same confusion in many sentences please help me Likewise, "These are the beautiful features that make/makes you awesome" Here make or makes creates difficulty

Hello kisa zehra,

When the subject of the verb is the third person (he/she/it) rather than I, you or they then we add 's' to the verb in the present simple. Therefore your second sentence should be as follows:

These are the beautiful features that make you awesome. ['features' is a plural verb, so no 's' is needed]

The first sentence needs to be rephrased to make it natural English:

Was that sarcasm or were your thanks genuine?

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you sir :) Sir, if I say "This beautiful feature make you handsome" here make is correct or we use makes? I know that we use "s" with he/she/it But in some sentences I have such complications Iam too weak in grammer :( but fortunately I've good friends who don't make fun of mine but this way I couldn't be able to recognize my grammer mistakes and this is the cause that I am always confused while speaking English ! Sir if you don't have any issues may I ask you my querries even silly querries ? Because iam too hesitant to ask from a teacher in front of class.

Hello kisa zehra,

You're right, here you should say 'makes'. This is because 'this beautiful feature' is a singular noun phrase.

I wouldn't say this is a silly question, and you are welcome to ask us questions, though please note that our primary purpose is to help users get the most out of our site. So sometimes we don't answer questions that are unrelated to what's here. Also, we don't answer general questions that would require lengthy explanations. So the more specific your question is, the more likely it is that we can answer it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

kisa zehra 提交于 周日, 21/08/2016 - 03:45

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Still i have a confusion in adverbs and adverbials

Hello kisa zehra,

An adverb is a kind of word. An adverbial is anything - a word or a phrase - which has the function of adverb. In other words, adverbials include adverbs and also phrases.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

kisa zehra 提交于 周六, 20/08/2016 - 12:30

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I didn't get what's the diff b/w adverb and adverbials

nkmg 提交于 周六, 06/08/2016 - 23:44

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Hello everyone : when i seared the meaning of this word ( Realistically) i found it adverb and in the explain of the word i found this sentence Realistically speaking, he hadn't a hope, but that didn't stop him trying. ( Realistically speaking), can we put adverb before a noun

Hello again nkmg,

Adverbs cannot directly modify nouns (e.g. 'he is a very boy' is not grammatical), but they can go before them, as in the sentence you ask about. Notice that there is a comma after 'realistically speaking', which indicates that it is an adverbial that modifies the whole phrase after it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Learningforbetter 提交于 周二, 02/08/2016 - 15:19

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Employee pleaded guilty to supplying information to other organizations. Employee pleaded guility of supplying information to other organizations. Could please answer which is right and what is difference in meaning by changing 'to' with 'of'.

Hello Learningforbetter,

The first sentence is correct here, I would say. The reason is that the preposition 'to' is related to the verb 'plead'. We use 'of' with a different verb:

The employee pleaded guilty to supplying information to other organizations.

The employee was guility of supplying information to other organizations.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

suryachaitanya 提交于 周六, 16/07/2016 - 15:09

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Sorry of the discomfort, In relation to the below comment, In sentences 1 and 2, does 'to write' act as infinitive (noun).

suryachaitanya 提交于 周六, 16/07/2016 - 14:55

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Please clarify the below. 1) I have asked him to write neatly. Or 2) I have asked him to write neat. I feel 2 is the correct way to express because in 1 neatly (adverb) is not related to verb have asked but in 2 neat is used as an adjective to describe how to write. 3) I have asked him clearly. In this sentence the clearly (adverb) describes about verb have asked. So I feel 2&3 are correct. Is this so, or my way of thinking is unclear. Please help me.

Hello suryachaitanya,

In sentence 1, 'neatly' goes with the verb 'write' (infinitive forms are not generally considered nouns in English) – it's a way of writing. The adjective form doesn't work here, because there is no noun for it to modify. In 3, there 'clearly', as an adverb, can only go with the verb 'asked' – there is no other adjective or adverb that it could modify.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

NasserAmeneh 提交于 周六, 09/07/2016 - 12:33

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Thanks for useful information about grammar

suryachaitanya 提交于 周三, 06/07/2016 - 20:42

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Please clarify with regard to the below 1) The soldiers passed by. 2) The soldiers passed by the road. In sentence 1 & 2 passed is the verb In sentence 1 by is adverb and in sentence 2 by is preposition. Is it so, Please clarify this.

Hello suryachaitanya,

Yes, I would agree with this. In the first sentence the verb is intransitive and 'by' is an adverb forming part of a phrasal verb. In the second sentence the verb is transitive and 'by' is a preposition with the object 'the road'.

Please note that there is an element of guesswork here. 'Pass by' can have several meanings, and I am assuming that the second sentence means 'moved past/close to the road'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Mr. Peter M and Mr.Kirk I feel embarassed that I only ask questions without being able to repay your kindness I wish you good health and wish you achieve what you want (unless it is not good) Yours Aris